Digging behind the headlines about factory robots and self-driving cars, wearable computers and digitized medicine, Carr explores the hidden costs of allowing software to take charge of our jobs and our lives. Drawing on history and philosophy, poetry and science, he makes a compelling case that the dominant Silicon Valley ethic is sapping our skills and narrowing our horizons.

Blurb from Nicholas Carr’s upcoming book, The Glass Cage

Working up Twitter, and then letting it take over

I have to work myself up in the morning to Twitter, because it’s so immediate and stressful. You shouldn’t have to dive completely into it. At first I’ll scroll through, and see if there’s anything from the last half hour or so that I may have missed while I was getting myself mentally prepared for the day. Then I’m off and running.

For the rest of the day, Twitter is the ruler of everything. I think that’s not an uncommon thing for people in our line of work to say. It’s really trumped everything else. When I started this job almost four years ago, I wasn’t even on Twitter and I barely used it as a source. But then, gradually, it took over my entire brain.

Jack Mirkinson, Senior Media Editor at The Huffington Post.

Working up Twitter, and then letting it take over