Link: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Examples of what a city would do with IoT:

“The private sector has pushed cities in a lot of ways,” she said. “My favorite example is, because Uber and Lyft and other transportation network companies could show you where your ride is on your phone, people started really asking, ‘Well, where’s my snow plow? Where are my services?’ It opened people’s minds to expecting more from the public sector, which is a healthy thing so long as the public sector has enough capacity for it.”
Original source: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Link: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Examples of what a city would do with IoT:

“The private sector has pushed cities in a lot of ways,” she said. “My favorite example is, because Uber and Lyft and other transportation network companies could show you where your ride is on your phone, people started really asking, ‘Well, where’s my snow plow? Where are my services?’ It opened people’s minds to expecting more from the public sector, which is a healthy thing so long as the public sector has enough capacity for it.”
Original source: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Link: Pivotal: innovative partnership saves big on US Air Force fuel costs

“The tanker refuelling system software for the air force – which runs on Pivotal Cloud Foundry – was built for under $2 million in 90 days and is now being used in operational areas including Qatar. It is currently saving the US Air Force $1 million per day in fuel costs, with the software being managed by just one person.”
Original source: Pivotal: innovative partnership saves big on US Air Force fuel costs

Link: AI Begins to Infiltrate the Enterprise

It could be a better list, sourced from companies, but good nonetheless: “Some of that confusion may be because there are so many potential use cases for AI. Experts pointed to help desk, customer support, recommendation engines, fraud detection, chatbots, image recognition, language processing and market segmentation as some of the possible applications of the technology. Andrews pointed out that AI could even be helpful at tasks like improving graduation rates at universities or reducing recidivism at prisons.”
Original source: AI Begins to Infiltrate the Enterprise

Bloomberg on kubernetes in Cloud Foundry

On overview of how Bloomberg is looking at the likes of Pivotal Container Services:

“Many Kubernetes distributions are good on day one, when they’re first deployed,” said Andrey Rybka, technical architect in the office of the CTO at Bloomberg, the global finance, media and tech company based in New York. “But what happens on day two, when something fails? Kubernetes doesn’t [automatically] address things like failures at the physical node level.”

And:

The roadmap for Cloud Foundry Container Runtime includes support for stateful applications based on the StatefulSets feature that became available with Kubernetes 1.7 in June. The foundation also plans to integrate the Istio project, founded by IBM, Google and Lyft in May, which helps to manage network communications between microservices

Also, see coverage of the general announcement in TechCrunch, the related press release, and our discussion in this week’s podcast.

Source: Cloud Foundry Container Runtime eases Kubernetes ops

American Airlines is a good profile of enterprise cloud buyer’s needs, hopes & dreams – Notebook

While this is sort of a bummer story for Pivotal (we’d like to have this account), it has a good profile of American and their needs in it. All of which are representative of other large organizations, e.g.:

  • Application types: “The first result is that the airline will migrate to the IBM Cloud some of its critical applications, including the main website, its customer-facing mobile app and its global network of check-in kiosks. Other workloads and tools, such as the company’s Cargo customer website, also will be moved to the IBM Cloud.”
  • Managed data-centers/cloud: “The airline will be able to utilize the global footprint of IBM Cloud, which consists of more than 50 data centers in 17 countries, in addition to a wide range of application development capabilities.”
  • Long-term planning: “We wanted to make sure that the cloud provider would be using Cloud Foundry and open-source technologies so we don’t get locked in by proprietary solutions,” Grubbs said. “We also wanted a partner that would offer us the agility to innovate at the organizational and process levels and have deep industry expertise with security at the core.”
  • We want to do all the new meat-ware: “As part of this process, American will work with IBM Global Services to use IBM’s Garage Methodology of creating applications through a micro-services architecture, design thinking, agile methodology, DevOps and lean development, the company said.”
  • Legacy, it’s how you got here: “IBM Cloud will help enable developers to build and change application functionalities for the airline’s customers. These customer-facing systems will be on the IBM Public Cloud, while American will maintain backend connectivity to other on-premise legacy and third-party systems, for true Hybrid Cloud functionality.”
  • There’s a lot going on: “American Airlines and its subsidiary, American Eagle, offer an average of 6,700 flights per day to about 350 destinations in more than 50 countries. American has hubs in Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas/Fort Worth, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Phoenix and Washington, D.C.”

Source: American Airlines Heads for a New Cloud with IBM