Link: Can IT finally deliver innovation without busting its own budget? Docker’s CEO says yes.

“What we’re seeing at companies like MetLife or Northern Trust is they’re taking their app and infrastructure management cost, and cutting it in half. Let’s say that you can cut 15 million dollars out of your app and infrastructure management cost, which by the way, some of our customers are at. That’s 50 million dollars you can go spend on innovation. That’s not going to the CEO and saying look, I need another hundred million dollars in my budget. That’s freeing up 50-100 million dollars of your existing budget.”

I assume that jump from $15m to $50m is a typo, or something.
Original source: Can IT finally deliver innovation without busting its own budget? Docker’s CEO says yes.

Link: Air Force looks to rapidly develop software with Project Kessel Run

More coverage of the USAF modernizing their approach to software. Here, what some of the apps are: “Kessel Run has been able to push five applications to the classified network, Kroger said…. The project is currently working on a number of things, including how the Air Force plans air tasking orders, a document which tasks units to fly their aircraft, Kroger said. It’s also working on building a tool that automates mission reports, which have to be written for every mission that flies, Kroger said.”

Original source: Air Force looks to rapidly develop software with Project Kessel Run

Link: Innovation at the edge: the top air defence trends by domain

“Software company Pivotal, backed by Dell EMC, VMWare, GE, Microsoft and Ford, has developed a tanker refuelling solution for the USAF with the US Defense Innovation Unit Experimental (DIUx); Running on the firm’s Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform, the software solution was built for under $2m in 90 days and is now being used in operational areas including Qatar. It currently saves the US Air Force $1 million per day in fuel costs, with the software being managed by just one person. It also aligns with USAF’s Air Operations Centre (AOC) capabilities via a continuous delivery software development pipeline to a hybrid cloud-based platform alongside the legacy AOC 10.1 system.”
Original source: Innovation at the edge: the top air defence trends by domain

Link: Innovation at the edge: the top air defence trends by domain

“Software company Pivotal, backed by Dell EMC, VMWare, GE, Microsoft and Ford, has developed a tanker refuelling solution for the USAF with the US Defense Innovation Unit Experimental (DIUx); Running on the firm’s Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform, the software solution was built for under $2m in 90 days and is now being used in operational areas including Qatar. It currently saves the US Air Force $1 million per day in fuel costs, with the software being managed by just one person. It also aligns with USAF’s Air Operations Centre (AOC) capabilities via a continuous delivery software development pipeline to a hybrid cloud-based platform alongside the legacy AOC 10.1 system.”
Original source: Innovation at the edge: the top air defence trends by domain

Link: Digital transformation in power generation and delivery

“Over the next decade, the electricity industry is predicted to unlock approximately $1.3 trillion in value through development and digitization of infrastructure, including platforms, devices, as well as cloud and advanced analytics.”

With the “greatest opportunities are predicted at the retail (8.5% EBIT improvement) and generation (6.6%) levels.”
Original source: Digital transformation in power generation and delivery

Link: Walmart, IBM, and blockchaining the supply chain

A longer piece, including some alternative suggestions from Gartner:

‘When it comes to supply chains, Valdes believes that blockchains could play an important coordinating role. “If you have a fragmented business ecosystem, with many parties who don’t know each other but need to do business, then they could collaborate through a blockchain,” he says. But there’s a catch. “It’s a ‘boil the ocean’ problem,” he says, meaning that it’ll take fundamental shifts in an industry for adoption to take place. Optimistically, he says, it would take a decade for the industry to rearrange itself so that everyone was logging interactions on a blockchain.

‘Valdes argues that a company as dominant as Walmart doesn’t need its suppliers on a blockchain. It can simply ask its vendors to use whatever system it chooses. “They have been very successful because over the years they have built a robust system of record for their supply chain,” he says. “If you were a supplier to them, you would happily accept their centralized version of the truth.”’
Original source: Walmart, IBM, and blockchaining the supply chain

Link: Volkswagen CIO Martin Hofmann: IT experts in our labs work the Silicon Valley way – Automotive World

‘Hofmann commented that at the same time Volkswagen was establishing new workstyles which are being further developed. “Our IT experts in our labs in Berlin and Munich work the Silicon Valley way, we have brought the Valley to Volkswagen. Pivotal is supporting our experts with over 20 experts from San Francisco and Boulder, Colorado, and is training them in new software development methods. Our aim is to firmly anchor these skills and workstyles in the Group and in Germany. In the medium term, there will be more than 600 programmers, data scientists, design thinking experts and cloud architects working in our labs in Berlin, Munich and San Francisco”, Hofmann said.’
Original source: Volkswagen CIO Martin Hofmann: IT experts in our labs work the Silicon Valley way – Automotive World