Link: Mission capability delivered at startup speed

More coverage of the US Air Force going all in on digital XP, lean design, and cloud native to dramatically – almost unbelievably so – modernize their software.

The mission capabilities these war fighters received in 120 days or less span deliberate targeting, mission reporting, advanced target production, refueling operations and many more, saving over $6.4 million and 1,100 man-hours per month within the Air Force Central Command.

More:

Embracing agile software development processes, the AOC leverages a highly disciplined approach to software engineering called Extreme Programming (XP), to gain the benefits of test-driven development, pair programming, continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD).

Original source: Mission capability delivered at startup speed

Link: It’s Not a Digital Transformation Without a Digital Culture

Signaling change with symbolic acts that embody the new culture is a good way to activate leadership characteristics quickly. For example, companies can designate meeting-free days to emphasize greater focus on action over planning, or they can give engineers a cash allowance to buy their own desktop equipment to demonstrate trust. Sometimes even a bold move, such as firing people whose behavior is antithetical to the new culture, is warranted. To signal change at Cisco, executives in certain divisions gave up their offices so the company could create team rooms; the company also started allowing employees to choose the workspace and tech tools that best fit their individual roles. The CEO of the North American software provider cited earlier began sending notes to employees who are praised by name in customer reviews. Such acknowledgment serves as an example of how company leaders can reinforce the customer-first mindset that’s central to the company culture. 

And more leadership tactics from BCG.
Original source: It’s Not a Digital Transformation Without a Digital Culture

Link: It’s Not a Digital Transformation Without a Digital Culture

Signaling change with symbolic acts that embody the new culture is a good way to activate leadership characteristics quickly. For example, companies can designate meeting-free days to emphasize greater focus on action over planning, or they can give engineers a cash allowance to buy their own desktop equipment to demonstrate trust. Sometimes even a bold move, such as firing people whose behavior is antithetical to the new culture, is warranted. To signal change at Cisco, executives in certain divisions gave up their offices so the company could create team rooms; the company also started allowing employees to choose the workspace and tech tools that best fit their individual roles. The CEO of the North American software provider cited earlier began sending notes to employees who are praised by name in customer reviews. Such acknowledgment serves as an example of how company leaders can reinforce the customer-first mindset that’s central to the company culture. 

And more leadership tactics from BCG.
Original source: It’s Not a Digital Transformation Without a Digital Culture

Link: Cloud Foundry Cult

Owen covers CF Summit Basel:

“The users we spoke with didn’t just see it as a PaaS – it was the underlying philosophy of application delivery and management upon which future developments would be based. The Foundation claims Cloud Foundry saves, on average, 10 weeks of development time and $100,000 per app development cycle. In fact, in its own survey, 92% of users cite cross-platform flexibility as important. If these panelists are gaining such benefits, it’s easy to understand why they are so enamored with it.”
Original source: Cloud Foundry Cult

Link: Cyber Airmen fuel innovation

Any problems discovered in the software can be more easily corrected, a small failure being preferable to correcting the shortfalls of an entire software suite. Changes requested by the customer can sometimes be delivered in just a couple days.

Prior to Jigsaw, the tanker mission planners would use whiteboards to plot out their fueling rendezvous.

“Rather than taking hours to run the calculations by hand for the hundreds of sorties scheduled each day to find a feasible plan,” Tatro said. “The program logs events in order to detect and report errors in scheduling.”

It didn’t take long for the new software to start paying off.

“Before Jigsaw was delivered to the tanker planners, they would be spending 8 to 12 hours a day with a team of five planning a day of tanker missions,” Maung said. “Now they only need three people and it takes them 4 to 5 hours, usually done before lunch.”

Since the program was put into use in April 2017, Jigsaw has saved approximately $200,000 per day, just in fuel. There were other benefits as well.
Original source: Cyber Airmen fuel innovation

Link: A useful big data story

In 2011 Friedberg decided to sell exclusively to farmers, and WeatherBill changed its name to The Climate Corporation. “We needed to feel a little less Silicon Valley and less whimsical,” said Friedberg. For the next few years he would spend half his time on the road, explaining himself to people whose first step was toward mistrust. “Farmers don’t believe anything,” he said. “There’s always been some bullshit product for farmers. And the people selling it are usually from out of town.”

He’d sit down in some barn or wood shop, pull out his iPad, and open up a map of whatever Corn Belt state he happened to be in. He’d let the farmer click on his field. Up popped the odds of various unpleasant weather events—a freeze, a drought, a hailstorm—and his crops’ sensitivity to them. He’d show the farmer how much money he would have made in each of the previous thirty years if he had bought weather insurance. Then David Friedberg, Silicon Valley kid, would teach the farmer about his own fields. He’d show the farmer exactly how much moisture the field contained at any given moment—above a certain level, the field would be damaged if worked on. He’d show him the rainfall and temperature every day—which you might think the farmer would know, but then the farmer might be managing twenty or thirty different fields, spread over several counties. He’d show the farmer the precise stage of growth of his crop, the best moments to fertilize, the optimum eight-day window to plant his seeds, and the ideal harvest date.

From The Fifth Risk.
Original source: A useful big data story