Link: Amy Chozick’s book is about Hillary Clinton — and all the things reporters don’t write in their stories about Hillary Clinton

“I think her career is going to be such a symbol of how we viewed powerful women in this period of American history, that it’s going to be incredibly important and studied for decades,” she said. “The fact the last chapter of her political career was up against this candidate who was bragging about sexually assaulting women, and had a known history of insulting women, it was such a confluence of forces.”
Original source: Amy Chozick’s book is about Hillary Clinton — and all the things reporters don’t write in their stories about Hillary Clinton

Link: Q&A on the Book Agile Management

“Most of the available maturity models measure the degree to which the agile techniques and tools are deployed. I prefer to look at it from a different angle. First, define what your most important performance indicators are with respect to agility. For instance, time-to-market, employee satisfaction, customer satisfaction, and so on. Then benchmark these, if possible. And also follow their development over time, to determine whether they are improving or not.”
Original source: Q&A on the Book Agile Management

Churchill’s Daily Practice

This was despite his continuing large daily intake of alcohol. Harold Nicolson recalls a friend coming away from lunch with Churchill “rather shocked by . . . the immense amount of port and brandy he consumed.” On a typical day, according to his aide Sir Ian Jacob, Churchill drank champagne and brandy with lunch, then, after his afternoon nap, had two or three glasses of whisky and soda, then champagne and brandy with dinner, followed by more whisky and soda. Jacob noted that he also sometimes accompanied his breakfast with white wine.

From Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom.

Link: How Does Advertising Work?

‘It is also SELECTIVE … because, apparently, we have always been overwhelmed by sensory data and can’t begin to notice it all. Even before Snap and the iPhone X, our brains said: “Too much! Give me the bullets!”… For advertising, the implications are obvious. To rise from our sensory swamp, an ad must be EMOTIONALLY INTENSE. We assume the binary default is positive, but there is evidence that negative works as well. This study (from a consultancy now called System 1) showed that ads we hate are more likely to get us to buy a product than ads we don’t notice’
Original source: How Does Advertising Work?

Link: How Tech Companies Became a Political Force

“When tech leaders prophesy a utopia of connectedness and freely flowing information, they do so as much out of self-interest as belief. Rather than a decentralized, democratic public square, the internet has given us a surveillance state monopolized by a few big players. That may puzzle technological determinists, who saw in networked communications the promise of a digital agora. But strip away the trappings of Google’s legendary origins or Atari’s madcap office culture, and you have familiar stories of employers versus employees, the maximization of profit, and the pursuit of power. In that way, at least, these tech companies are like so many of the rest.”
Original source: How Tech Companies Became a Political Force

Link: The parent trap: can you be a good writer and a good parent?

“I had experienced being judged as a mother, when I periodically left my son with my husband from the age of six months – he is six now – to go away to write. I only departed for a week at a time. But who knows what I might have done had I lived in 1940s Southern Rhodesia, trapped in a life of coffee mornings and sundowners, worrying, as Lessing did, that the time when she could openly be herself might never come.”

Original source: The parent trap: can you be a good writer and a good parent?