Link: Ride-hailing app Grab partners Maybank for mobile wallet launch

To be a little Friedman in a taxi here: when I was in Jakarta, you could see the huge banking expansion available in converting much of the country to cashless. All these merchants and buyers (people, if you will) who are purely cash based and don’t have bank accounts. And that’s just one (albeit it, giant) city:

Ooi Huey Tyng, MD, GrabPay Singapore, Malaysia and Philippines, says: “The whole industry needs to come together to make the cashless economy a reality in Malaysia. We are honoured to partner with Maybank which not only shares our vision of a cashless payments future, but also recognises Grab as ideally poised to help make this a reality.

“With GrabPay mobile wallet as the leading payment method on our Grab app, it will build an interconnected ecosystem of our services, thus making Grab an everyday app to complement consumers’ everyday lifestyle.”

Also, I love this “cashless” term. So much better than “mobile payments.”
Original source: Ride-hailing app Grab partners Maybank for mobile wallet launch

Link: Ride-hailing app Grab partners Maybank for mobile wallet launch

To be a little Friedman in a taxi here: when I was in Jakarta, you could see the huge banking expansion available in converting much of the country to cashless. All these merchants and buyers (people, if you will) who are purely cash based and don’t have bank accounts. And that’s just one (albeit it, giant) city:

Ooi Huey Tyng, MD, GrabPay Singapore, Malaysia and Philippines, says: “The whole industry needs to come together to make the cashless economy a reality in Malaysia. We are honoured to partner with Maybank which not only shares our vision of a cashless payments future, but also recognises Grab as ideally poised to help make this a reality.

“With GrabPay mobile wallet as the leading payment method on our Grab app, it will build an interconnected ecosystem of our services, thus making Grab an everyday app to complement consumers’ everyday lifestyle.”

Also, I love this “cashless” term. So much better than “mobile payments.”
Original source: Ride-hailing app Grab partners Maybank for mobile wallet launch

Link: The Sorry State of Digital Transformation in 2018

Organizations talk a lot about transformation, but their actions don’t always back it up:

“To find out the state of digital transformation, we surveyed 1,600 business and IT decision-makers in North American and European enterprises. The answer? Sorry, I’m afraid. As you can see from the picture below, 21% of firms think their transformation is dusted and done. Really? Done? And another 22% are investigating or not transforming at all. And while 56% of firms are transforming, their level of investment and scope of transformation are still mostly small. For example, only 34% of banks and insurers are even bothering to transform marketing and only 45% are transforming customer care — a too-small percentage given consumers’ of mass adoption of mobile devices.

“Why? As one respondent put it, “It’s a war between old-school technophobe leaders and the technology innovation that represents a completely different way of doing business.”
Original source: The Sorry State of Digital Transformation in 2018

Link: Fintech Has Grown Up

“Fintech has lost its direct-to-consumer ambition. Previous editions of Finovate have seen presentations by now established brands like Fidor Bank, eToro, Kabbage, rPlan, and Scalable Capital. Most of these startups have since shifted their business model from just direct to customers – consumers or businesses – to some form of B2B2C, working with incumbents as their distribution partners. That’s because despite all the claims about incumbents neglecting their customers’ needs, customer acquisition in financial services remains hard and expensive.”
Original source: Fintech Has Grown Up

Link: Fintech Has Grown Up

“Fintech has lost its direct-to-consumer ambition. Previous editions of Finovate have seen presentations by now established brands like Fidor Bank, eToro, Kabbage, rPlan, and Scalable Capital. Most of these startups have since shifted their business model from just direct to customers – consumers or businesses – to some form of B2B2C, working with incumbents as their distribution partners. That’s because despite all the claims about incumbents neglecting their customers’ needs, customer acquisition in financial services remains hard and expensive.”
Original source: Fintech Has Grown Up

Link: API’s and Mainframes

“When looking at exploiting them from the web, if you let “imagineers” run away with what they “might” want, you’ll fail. You have to start with exposing the transaction and database as a set of core services based on the first application that will use them. Define your API structure to allow for growth and further exploitation. That’s what we successfully did for NatWest. The project rolled out on the internal IP network, and a year later, to the public via the Internet.” Original source: API’s and Mainframes

In finance, large banks seem to be fast followers, not disruption victims

Eventually every advisor will be a robo-advisor, which means there will be convergence.

Without some marketshare numbers, it’s tough to tell if the banking startups are making a dent against incumbent banks. Josh Brown suggests that banks are quick to catch-up and have nullified any lead that companies like Weathfront could have made:

It wasn’t long before the weaker B2C robo-advisors folded, the middling players were acquired and the incumbents launched their own competing platforms. The miscalculation on the part of the disruptors may have been the idea that they had years of lead time to scale up their assets before the lumbering giants of the industry would be able to fight back. Turns out they only had months, not years. Charles Schwab and Vanguard launched their own versions of the service and the mindshare / market share battle was joined.

Checks out

From what I see out there, banks are quick to adapt and adopt new ideas into their businesses. While they’re beset with endless legacy IT and technical debt, they churn ahead nonetheless, e.g.:

While past performance is no guarantee of future results, and even though all the company’s results cannot be entirely attributed to BBVA’s digital transformation plan, so far many signs are encouraging. The number of BBVA’s digital customers increased by 68% from 2011 to 2014, reaching 8.4 million in mid-2014, of which 3.6 million were active mobile users.

Acquisition isn’t always failure, or victory

On the narrative framing side, it’s easy to frame a startup being acquired as “failure” and success for incumbents. That’s not always the case, and suggests a zero-sum view of innovation in industries. Acquisitions can have winners and losers – as with valuing anything, like real estate, the valuation could be wrong and in favor of the buyer or seller.

However, in the ideal case of an acquisition, it makes strategic sense for the buyer to spend their time and money that way instead of trying to innovate on it’s own. For the startup being acquired, they’re usually near the end of their gamble of sacrificing profit in favor of innovation and growth and need someone to bring them to the black.

Link