Link: AT&T’s ‘Public-Cloud First’ Proclamation a Stake in the Ground

For AT&T to now start the process of adopting the public cloud for what are admittedly “non-network applications” is a big move. It shows that even the most stodgy industry verticals are on board with moving to the public cloud. This will provide a significant new revenue stream for those cloud providers but at the same time allow for greater scale that could drive down pricing models.

Source: AT&T’s ‘Public-Cloud First’ Proclamation a Stake in the Ground

How Sainsbury’s uses AWS

On Sainsbury’s move and use of AWS, serverless, and DevOps:

“Our relationship with AWS really kicked off at the point we decided to take our groceries online business and rebuild it in the cloud. This was effectively taking a WebSphere e-commerce monolith with an Oracle RAC database, and moving it, and modularising it, and putting it into AWS,” Sainsbury’s CIO Phil Jordan told the audience.

“That movement of RAC to RDS and that big database migration was all done using AWS services, and now we have a fully fledged cloud-native-ish service that runs groceries online across all of our business. Today, we run about 80 per cent of our groceries online with EC2, and 20 per cent is serverless.”

In total, the company migrated more than 7TB of data into the cloud. As a result, or so Jordan claimed, the mart spends 30 per cent less on infrastructure, and regularly sees a 70-80 per cent improvement in performance of interactions on the website and batch processing. So far, there’s been no “major” outages, said the CIO, without defining “major”.

Moving to the cloud has also helped Sainsbury’s into the warm infinity-looped embrace of DevOps. The company has moved from five to six releases per year to multiple releases per day, said the CIO.

Source: Holy high street, Sainsbury’s! Have you forgotten Bezos’ bunch are the competition?

Check out their talk, scrub in to about 24:10.

Related, the Sainsbury’s tech blog is pretty good.

And, from elsewhere and unrelated to Sainsbury’s, some clearer notion that “serverless” forces an event-driven architecture:

So why can’t we just write an event-driven system for our corporate infrastructure? Our world, is event-driven, and generally, we reduce the complexity of our systems by just defining events. “When there’s an access to the FTP service of upload … do this …”, “When there’s an access on a column on a database … do this “. In an IoT world, with billions of disparate devices, it is the only way to go. And if we are to create truly citizen-focused systems, we need to define the events which trigger. How many organisations could crisply define the operation of their infrastructure and all the interactions that happen?

Rather than just defining a server running Exchange, we could have some code which triggers on “When Bob logs-in open up his mail box”, or “When Alice changes the marks for her students, send an update to the exams office”. This is a world where the complexity of servers moves us towards “The Cloud” as a computation resource. In this way we write rules based on events and enact them in the Cloud. There’s no concept of running Exchange or Web servers.

Link: Comic Relief switched from multi-cloud to serverless with AWS and saw a 93% cost reduction

As a team, going serverless has given us a lot more velocity, we can rapidly release, we can test the same infrastructure we’re deploying in production, in a pull request environment, in a staging environment, we can rapidly retest ideas- and every developer can do that because we’re using Lambda to load test, so the power it gives you as a developer and engineering team is pretty amazing.

Source: Comic Relief switched from multi-cloud to serverless with AWS and saw a 93% cost reduction

Link: Standard Bank contracts with AWS for mass migration to the cloud

The bank has selected AWS as its preferred cloud provider with the intention of porting its production workloads, including its customer facing platforms and strategic core banking applications to the cloud.

From what I can tell talking with banks, they’re over that 2010 thing of “public cloud isn’t secure enough.” Now it’s a scramble to move their shit up there.

Source: Standard Bank contracts with AWS for mass migration to the cloud

Link: AWS’s Snowball Edge

A private cloud box from Amazon:

The Snowball Edge Compute Optimized with GPU includes an on-board GPU that you can use to do real-time full-motion video analysis & processing, machine learning inferencing, and other highly parallel compute-intensive work. You can launch an sbe-g instance to gain access to the GPU.

It has Lamda and EC2 capability, targeted at data
manipulation and getting it into (and out of?) AWS. There’s a lot of IoT stuff in AWS now, opening their platform up to things like smart cities, power grid management, and thermostats and lights and shit.
Original source: AWS’s Snowball Edge

Link: This is the Amazon everyone should have feared — and it has nothing to do with its retail business

“the massive online retailer once again posted its largest quarterly profit in history — $2.5 billion for the quarter — on the back of two businesses that were afterthoughts just a few years ago: Amazon Web Services, its cloud computing unit, as well as its fast-growing advertising business.”

Good charts, too.
Original source: This is the Amazon everyone should have feared — and it has nothing to do with its retail business

Link: Amazon lost cloud market share to Microsoft in the fourth quarter: KeyBanc

For 4Q2017: “Amazon Web Services had 62 percent market share in the quarter, down from 68 percent a year earlier, KeyBanc’s Brent Bracelin and other analysts wrote in a note on Thursday. Microsoft Azure jumped from 16 percent to 20 percent, and Google’s share increased from 10 percent to 12 percent, they said.”
Original source: Amazon lost cloud market share to Microsoft in the fourth quarter: KeyBanc

AWS’s private cloud stuff to day, plus VMware

Good round-up of AWS’s private cloud stuff:

  • AWS added on-premises support to its CodeDeploy continuous-delivery service in 2015.
  • AWS introduced the Snowball storage server companies could use to copy data and then ship it to the cloud in 2015.
  • AWS added on-premises support to its EC2 Run Command tool for running shell scripts on many machines at once in 2016.
  • AWS unveiled the Snowmobile truck for copying even larger supplies of data and then hauling it off to Amazon in 2016.
  • This past November AWS released a container image of its Amazon Linux server operating system for use on corporate servers.

Source: AWS talking with VMware about building on-premises software: report

Avoiding your rival’s cloud with multi-cloud capabilities

[O]ne well-publicized case in that vein, they said, was Home Depot directly working with Pivotal Software to introduce Pivotal Cloud Foundry to Google Cloud Platform. The home improvement retailer wanted to continue to use the popular development environment in the public cloud, but avoid giving business to Amazon’s largest profit-generating division.

A Pivotal spokesperson told CRN that Home Depot, like other Fortune 500 retail customers using Pivotal Cloud Foundry for app development, prefer Google Cloud Platform or Microsoft Azure above AWS. Pivotal and Google “rapidly accelerated joint R&D efforts to add new capabilities,” he said, “encouraged” by those retail giants.

At the same time, Pivotal and Microsoft have also stepped up efforts to integrate capabilities on Azure, “primarily driven by automakers,” he said.

Source: Partners Grapple With Conflicts Between Retail Customers And Amazon – Page: 3 | CRN

The Economist on Amazon – Highlights

  • Video: “In 2017 Amazon is expected to spend $4.5bn on television and film content, roughly twice what HBO will spend. But it has a big payoff.”
  • Prime momentum: “Mr Nowak reckons the company had 72m Prime members last year, up by 32% from 2015.”
  • Cloud: “Last year AWS’s revenue reached $12bn, up by more than 150% since 2014.”
  • Anti-trust, in the US: “If competitors fail to halt Amazon’s whirl of activities, antitrust enforcers might yet do so instead. This does not seem an imminent threat. American antitrust authorities mainly consider a company’s effect on consumers and pricing, not broader market power. By that standard, Amazon has brought big benefits.”

Are investors too optimistic about Amazon?

The laundry list of AWS’s ITIL/ITSM stuff

From William Fellows at 451:

 > AWS Managed Services (AMS) includes change management, provisioning and configuration management, event and incident management, security management, patch management, continuity management (backup/restore), and reporting, supported via APIs and AWS services. AWS Managed Services infrastructure building blocks include managed VPC within a specific AWS region; isolation of applications via subnets and security groups; shared services, such as authentication, collaboration and intranet; DMZ access to the internet; and DirectConnect for internal connectivity and access management via corporate AD/Auth systems versus native IAM. (AWS says IAM does not work for the data plane, and is only for the AWS control plane. It uses IAM for the AWS components – the customer can also do an ADFS-to-IAM integration to use their AD credentials for control/data plane access.)

Source: ITIL for cloud: AWS reaches for the soul of the enterprise

Link: Googles challenge in enterprise cloud

Post Alphabet, where any previous inhibitions about pursuing new hobbies have evaporated, it is even harder to imagine the “capital allocators” choosing to invest in thousands of enterprise sales and support people given alternatives involving life extension and/or space elevators. After all, won’t the robotics division eventually solve any problem that today requires humans?

The rest of the state of cloud is pretty good. It’s a regular “pulls no punches and punches everyone” type situation.

If you threw in some charts and numbers, you’d have an even fancier missive, but qualitatively: just Jim-dandy.

Amazon built my private cloud

Some good stuff from the latest from the $600m private cloud the CIA got from Amazon, including:

Meanwhile, Wolfe also acknowledged lingering industry criticism of its 2013 decision to award the $600 million cloud computing contract to AWS, essentially putting all the agency’s eggs in one basket. IBM unsuccessfully protested the cloud contract award to AWS. The CIA official defended the contract award this week, saying it provided AWS with nothing more than concrete pads and power to build the CIA cloud datacenters. AWS delivered all other cloud infrastructure and was up and running in less than 18 months, he added.

The scary thing would be if Amazon can build a $100m private cloud…a $10m one…then things get weird for vendors who are trying to achieve asymmetric competition with Amazon by hiding in private cloud land.

Also some fun anecdotes on resistance to change.