AWS’s private cloud stuff to day, plus VMware

Good round-up of AWS’s private cloud stuff:

  • AWS added on-premises support to its CodeDeploy continuous-delivery service in 2015.
  • AWS introduced the Snowball storage server companies could use to copy data and then ship it to the cloud in 2015.
  • AWS added on-premises support to its EC2 Run Command tool for running shell scripts on many machines at once in 2016.
  • AWS unveiled the Snowmobile truck for copying even larger supplies of data and then hauling it off to Amazon in 2016.
  • This past November AWS released a container image of its Amazon Linux server operating system for use on corporate servers.

Source: AWS talking with VMware about building on-premises software: report

Avoiding your rival’s cloud with multi-cloud capabilities

[O]ne well-publicized case in that vein, they said, was Home Depot directly working with Pivotal Software to introduce Pivotal Cloud Foundry to Google Cloud Platform. The home improvement retailer wanted to continue to use the popular development environment in the public cloud, but avoid giving business to Amazon’s largest profit-generating division.

A Pivotal spokesperson told CRN that Home Depot, like other Fortune 500 retail customers using Pivotal Cloud Foundry for app development, prefer Google Cloud Platform or Microsoft Azure above AWS. Pivotal and Google “rapidly accelerated joint R&D efforts to add new capabilities,” he said, “encouraged” by those retail giants.

At the same time, Pivotal and Microsoft have also stepped up efforts to integrate capabilities on Azure, “primarily driven by automakers,” he said.

Source: Partners Grapple With Conflicts Between Retail Customers And Amazon – Page: 3 | CRN

The Economist on Amazon – Highlights

  • Video: “In 2017 Amazon is expected to spend $4.5bn on television and film content, roughly twice what HBO will spend. But it has a big payoff.”
  • Prime momentum: “Mr Nowak reckons the company had 72m Prime members last year, up by 32% from 2015.”
  • Cloud: “Last year AWS’s revenue reached $12bn, up by more than 150% since 2014.”
  • Anti-trust, in the US: “If competitors fail to halt Amazon’s whirl of activities, antitrust enforcers might yet do so instead. This does not seem an imminent threat. American antitrust authorities mainly consider a company’s effect on consumers and pricing, not broader market power. By that standard, Amazon has brought big benefits.”

Are investors too optimistic about Amazon?

Software Defined Talk: Docker is just cheap VMware, right?

Our new episode is up, from this past Friday:

There’s tell that some people just look at containers as a cheaper way to virtualize, eschewing the fancy-lad “cloud-native stuff.” We discuss that idea, plus “the enterprise cloud wars,” and also our feel that Slack is actually a really good tool and company.

Listen directly, subscribe to the podcast feed, and go check out the full show notes, which has a web player as well.

The laundry list of AWS’s ITIL/ITSM stuff

From William Fellows at 451:

 > AWS Managed Services (AMS) includes change management, provisioning and configuration management, event and incident management, security management, patch management, continuity management (backup/restore), and reporting, supported via APIs and AWS services. AWS Managed Services infrastructure building blocks include managed VPC within a specific AWS region; isolation of applications via subnets and security groups; shared services, such as authentication, collaboration and intranet; DMZ access to the internet; and DirectConnect for internal connectivity and access management via corporate AD/Auth systems versus native IAM. (AWS says IAM does not work for the data plane, and is only for the AWS control plane. It uses IAM for the AWS components – the customer can also do an ADFS-to-IAM integration to use their AD credentials for control/data plane access.)

Source: ITIL for cloud: AWS reaches for the soul of the enterprise

054: Eventually, you’ll be selling to Large Enterprises – Software Defined Talk

Summary

With Matt Ray in Australia we discuss the character of the tech scene over in that neck of the woods. We also talk about Oracle’s new positioning as one-stop cloud shop, The Gang of Four/FANG type thinking, and balancing small company culture vs. selling to The Enterprise.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed, or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Interested in speeding your software’s cycle time, reducing release cycles, and a resilient cloud platform? Check out the free ebook on Cloud Foundry or take Cloud Foundry for a test drive with Pivotal Web Services. See those and other things at cote.io/pivotal.

Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes, RSS Feed

Show notes

Bonus Links, not covered in show

Recommendations

Link: Googles challenge in enterprise cloud

Post Alphabet, where any previous inhibitions about pursuing new hobbies have evaporated, it is even harder to imagine the “capital allocators” choosing to invest in thousands of enterprise sales and support people given alternatives involving life extension and/or space elevators. After all, won’t the robotics division eventually solve any problem that today requires humans?

The rest of the state of cloud is pretty good. It’s a regular “pulls no punches and punches everyone” type situation.

If you threw in some charts and numbers, you’d have an even fancier missive, but qualitatively: just Jim-dandy.