Link: ‘Big Tech’ isn’t one big monopoly – it’s 5 companies all in different businesses

‘But despite simple perception of them all as “tech” companies, their core revenue sources are clearly different. And those distinctions suggest ways people can understand and respond to anxieties about their growing economic and cultural influence.’
Original source: ‘Big Tech’ isn’t one big monopoly – it’s 5 companies all in different businesses

Link: Apple bringing medical records to iPhone, Apple Watch

“It all works when a user opens the iPhone’s health app, navigates to the health record section, and, on the new tool, adds a health provider. From there, the user taps to connect to Apple’s software system and data start streaming into the service. Patients will get notified via an alert if new information becomes available.”

Sounds cool. We’ll see. Apple often takes 2-3 years to actually have software that works well and is useful. And then, as with Photos, they fuck it up 2-3 years late.
Original source: Apple bringing medical records to iPhone, Apple Watch

Link: Apple’s Siri-equipped HomePod comes to your home on February 9

Apple is pretty cool consistent in anemic features versus alternatives, but like the Windows says. Of course, when Apple nails the opinionated workflow, you appreciate it:

“Since Apple revealed HomePod, it’s been clear that the company is focusing more on sound quality and the music-listening experience with this smart speaker than Siri’s capabilities as a home assistant. That’s why Apple’s device is so much more expensive than most Amazon Echo devices and the Google Home and Home Mini speakers (although Google does have Home Max, its own high-end smart speaker). However, HomePod will not launch with an important music feature: multi-room audio and stereo. Apple states that this will come to HomePod later this year through a free software update, allowing two or more HomePods to play the same audio throughout an entire home or specific room.”
Original source: Apple’s Siri-equipped HomePod comes to your home on February 9

Apple makes major podcast updates, tracking how much user’s actually listen

Apple said today that it will be using (anonymized) data from the app to show podcasters how many people are listening and where in the app people are stopping or skipping. This has the potential to dramatically change our perception of how many people really listen to a show, and how many people skip ads, as well as how long a podcast can run before people just give up.

Link

Meddling with Apple and Chinese Manufacturing

A nice discussion that highlights the complexity id trade policy and, thus, rhe high risks of fucking it up. I like this critique of trade criticism:

What makes Navarro’s critique challenging is that it’s not wholly wrong, at least from the American worker perspective, yet it’s not particularly actionable.

So often, that last part is overlooked: you have to actually be able to on something, despite the past. Until we have time machines, finding flaws and suggesting how we should have fixed them is little use on its own. Sure, you need a good analysis of history to figure out what to do next, but it’s deciding what to do next, and doing it, that count.

Link