Link: The Air Force Will Treat Computer Coding Like a Foreign Language

For example, when Defense Innovation Unit went to air operations centers in Middle East, the defense tech expert envisioned software changes that would optimize the way that airmen tracked refueling tankers. Teaming up with a commercial firm in Boston called Pivotal Labs, the new software is saving about $200,000 in fuel every month.

It’s usually reported at $200,000 a day.

Mostly, though, lots of AI talk:

During Operation Inherent Resolve, he led 1,800 Air Component Commander analysts to create the first-ever visualization of millions of data points from sources including unmanned aerial vehicles and open-source streams. That reduced 1.5 hours of daily target development to five minutes. He also provided intelligence support to the fight against ISIS that increased deliberate (i.e. pre-planned) target development by 68 percent.
Original source: The Air Force Will Treat Computer Coding Like a Foreign Language

Link: Farmers Insurance Tests AI, Automation’s Potential For Speeding Up Claims Process

“AI-powered image recognition couldhelp speed up the claims process for damages related to, for example, windshields. Windshield claims are common and easy to resolve but still often require claims adjusters to go out in the field and make assessments, Mr. Guerra said.”
Original source: Farmers Insurance Tests AI, Automation’s Potential For Speeding Up Claims Process

Link: The Smart, the Stupid, and the Catastrophically Scary

“Part of me likes being a programmer—because we’re the last job. I can see a future—if we don’t manage to blow ourselves up first—in the robot paradise where people are either robot engineers or programmers, or I guess do marketing. Or maybe bake pies, or smell things? Those are essentially the hardest things for a computer to do. But computers do everything else.”
Original source: The Smart, the Stupid, and the Catastrophically Scary

Link: Does Your Company Have an AI Strategy, Really?

“A global survey of more than 3,000 executives by the Boston Consulting Group and MIT’s Sloan Management Review found that 84 percent of respondents believe AI will enable them to obtain or sustain a competitive advantage, 83 percent feel AI is a strategic priority for their businesses today, and 75 percent are counting on AI to open opportunities for new businesses and ventures.”

Also, a generalized set of questions for thinking through what AI stuff to do and strategize about in the enterprise.
Original source: Does Your Company Have an AI Strategy, Really?

Link: Liberty Mutual embraces AI, blockchain

“The Boston insurer is also testing blockchain software to develop a platform intended to create an audit trail and move money across the business faster, Scerbo says. Blockchain could eventually present carriers with the opportunity to pair the ledger technology with IoT to avoid fraud using connected-car sensors and smart home devices increasingly being adopted by consumers. Collected information would be sent to the blockchain, where it would be distributed to a slew of computers with no need for a middle man.”
Original source: Liberty Mutual embraces AI, blockchain

Link: GDPR Seen Slowing AI Innovation

Given all the Facebook stuff, I think less balancing towards the side of the robots would probably probably be good:

‘A recent study advocating a U.S. strategy for developing machine intelligence also noted the potential barriers to development that include GDPR and other data privacy efforts. The study released by the Center for Strategic and International Studies warned that the shift to “data localization” will require “balancing legitimate concerns around privacy and consumer protection both in the United States and abroad with the need for an open, flexible data ecosystem that supports innovation and experimentation in AI.”’
Original source: GDPR Seen Slowing AI Innovation