Facebook ads don’t work too well for “enterprise” types

I am going to sound incredibly churlish here but why on earth Lionel Messi could possibly like our stuff is well beyond my imagination. Flattering though it might be. The same goes for the 20 year career short order cook who posts cat pictures, the retired person who joined Facebook last week, the nurse with a heavy religious bent. On and on it went.

Long ago I tried some ads for RedMonk on Facebook. I think I targeted them at people who worked for IBM. It was hard to figure out if anything “worked.” As with most things in work-life, I think you need to have a highly targeted, simple plan in place. Otherwise, you’re casting a broad net and doing classic advertising.

The other issue is the fact that “enterprise tech” is very niche-y. One would think LinkedIn would be a better place for ads, Techmeme, or even parts of StackExchange. Maybe TechTarget or the occasional ZDNet and such. I think sites like The New Stack have a good chance to assemble (you could also say “aggregate” in this context) a hard to find tech audience and server up better ad space. We’ll see.

Facebook ads don’t work too well for “enterprise” types

The $158B data-driven advertising market

I guess this why companies like Oracle and IBM keep buying advertising SaaSes and such:

The report estimates that in 2012, the data-driven marketing economy added $156 billion in revenue to the U.S. economy and fueled more than 675,000 jobs. To put that statistic in perspective, that’s nearly half of total U.S. expenditures on marketing and advertising services (estimated at $292 billion annually), more than half the size of the entire Internet ecosystem (estimated by the IAB at $300 billion) and more than two-thirds the size of the entire e-commerce market.

The $158B data-driven advertising market

Who hasn’t had the “all I’ve done for five years is micro improvements to a paid-search algorithm” existential crisis?

Your parents want to know why on Earth you’d leave a job at Google. “Honey? Aren’t they worth billions of dollars?” “Yeah, Ma. But I’m working on a large team of people trying to figure out how to make micro improvements to a paid-search algorithm. Fun stuff, I know, but it’s time for me to try something more stimulating.” “Oh, OK, Honey. But aren’t you getting married next year? How are you going to pay for the wedding?”

Who hasn’t had the “all I’ve done for five years is micro improvements to a paid-search algorithm” existential crisis?

How would you define work in a networked world?

Most of these dynamics predate the internet, but digital technologies are magnifying their salience. People keep returning to the mantra of “work-life balance” as a model for thinking about their lives, even as it’s hard to distinguish between what constitutes work and what constitutes life, which is presumably non-work. But this binary makes little sense for many people. And it raises a serious question: what does labor mean in a digital ecosystem where sociality is monetized and personal and professional identities are blurred?

How would you define work in a networked world?