Meddling with Apple and Chinese Manufacturing

A nice discussion that highlights the complexity id trade policy and, thus, rhe high risks of fucking it up. I like this critique of trade criticism:

What makes Navarro’s critique challenging is that it’s not wholly wrong, at least from the American worker perspective, yet it’s not particularly actionable.

So often, that last part is overlooked: you have to actually be able to on something, despite the past. Until we have time machines, finding flaws and suggesting how we should have fixed them is little use on its own. Sure, you need a good analysis of history to figure out what to do next, but it’s deciding what to do next, and doing it, that count.

Link

Cloud Foundry’s Vision: A Services Ecosystem that Transcends Containers

“What’s the whole point of Cloud Foundry? It’s an abstraction on infrastructure,” stated Kearns. “And really, if you net it even further down, the whole point is to absolve organizations — particularly, traditional, non-tech organizations — from undifferentiating heavy lifting. What that means is, working on things that are not relevant or differentiating for your business.

Also, much discussion of the history of service broker/registries.

Link

Pivotal Cloud Foundry 1.9 out

The new version of Pivotal Cloud Foundry (“PCF” as folks like to say) is out. It has a whole slew of updates across the board.

My selective highlights:

  • Google Cloud & Azure support, so you’re all multi-cloud ready (still with OpenStack, VMware, and AWS support).
  • Will run 250,000 containers concurrently; in addition to scaling based on  CPU usage, you can now auto-scale on HTTP Latency and HTTP Throughput.
  • Updates to Spring Cloud, Zipkin, and Spring Boot Actuators for diagnostic stuff.
  • MySQL updates, esp. for multi-zone support in AWS.
  • “Tasks” one time processes that are an initial cut at “serverless”
  • A slew of security updates.

See more – much more – features and details in Jared’s blog post wrapping the release up.

2% increase in IT budgets predicted

The big takeaway is that small increases in IT budgets are the new normal. Unlike previous recoveries, we have not seen a large jump in IT spending over the past five years. So if a CIO is only seeing a two or three percent increase this year, he or she should understand that is pretty much in line with other companies.

See more guidance charts on IT priorities, n=190.

Link

Puppet and containers

When we’re talking with customers about the value that Puppet brings to them, invariably we talk about the future, and the future in their mind in some ways includes containers. There’s a lot experimentation going on. There’s a lot of Docker work being done and container work being done, Kubernetes work being done on their laptops. The conversations we have with them is how does Puppet help you bring it into production, into mission-critical production? How do you keep it secure? How do you operate it? All of those things that we know how to do and have done with various kinds of infrastructure, whether it was OpenStack, whether it was virtual machines, whether it’s just server configuration. For us, we take the same approach to containers and are evolving our road maps to make sure that customers have the same benefits they’ve have had over the years now with containers or other technology.

From an interview with Puppets CEO, Sanjay Mirchandani.

Link

Oracle losing legacy software sales, growing (public?) cloud sales

Once again, the key metric of new software license sales was off—falling 19% to $1.35 billion compared to last year, and missing analysts’ expectations of $1.44 billion.

On the other hand:

“Our cloud revenue will be larger than our new software license revenue next fiscal year, when the transition will be largely complete.”

And:

“Our cloud applications goal is to be the world largest and most profitable SaaS company. We are growing our cloud business much faster than Salesforce.com, and we can beat them to the $10 billion mark, but it’s going to be close,” Ellison told analysts on the call.

Also:

Database-as-a-service, which basically runs a company’s database on a third party’s cloud, is a fast-growing category for Oracle, according to the company. In fact, Oracle co-CEO Mark Hurd said that business was up 700% year over year, hitting $100 million in quarterly revenue.

Source: Oracle’s Cloud Business Has Yet to Surpass Its Falling License Sales

Autonomy quarter stuffing

When Autonomy was negotiating a sale to an end user, but couldn’t close the sale by quarter’s end, Egan would approach the resellers on or near the last day of the quarter, saying the deal was nearly done. Egan coaxed the resellers to buy Autonomy software by paying them hefty commissions. The resellers could then sell the software to a specified end user – but Autonomy maintained control of the deals and handled negotiations with the end user without the resellers’ aid. There’s no way these transactions could be revenue.

Link

Developer Relations: More than Traveling the World and Buying People Beer

Some tactical advice, with some small survey figures:

It was a small survey of 79 people, which isn’t particularly surprising since there aren’t that many developer relations roles. Some of the top skills needed to be successful in developer relations include communication, technical, and empathy. They also travel to a lot of events, 50 percent attend more than 15 events per year and 55 percent of them plan to attend even more next year.

Events, direct one-to-one communications, content marketing, and social media are seen as the most effective channels for developer outreach. Developer relations is a fairly new field. Almost 50 percent of developer relations programs where these people work are 2-4 years old and just over 25 percent were less than a year old, which is similar to the experience of developer relations professionals with just under 45 percent of them in the field for 2-4 years. There are also a lot of lone wolves with 30 percent of people surveyed being the only person in their company doing developer relations, and just over 30 percent have teams of 2-5 people.

Link

On-prem still a big thing, Gartner survey

only 10% of organizations surveyed by Gartner are expected to close their on-premises data centers by 2018

Much of Pivotal’s business is on-premises, very much if it. However, most large organizations I talk with really want to get to much more public cloud as soon as possible. They look to Pivotal Cloud Foundry’s multi-cloud compatibility to help them down the line with that. For example, Home Depot is starting to move applications to Google Cloud.

Anyhow, most people outside of enterprise IY are surprised and a bit incredulous at how much “private cloud” there still is: ¯_(ツ)_/¯

Link

Amazon is building an ‘Uber for trucking’ app

The app, scheduled to launch in summer 2017, is designed to make it easier for truck drivers to find shippers that need goods moved, much like the way Uber connects drivers with riders. It would also eliminate the need for a third-party broker, which typically charges a commission of about 15% for doing the middleman work.

This is one of those “software is eating the world” things that I would have thought existed already.

[T]he broader goal is to improve the “middle mile” logistics space, which is largely controlled by third-party brokers that charge a hefty fee for handling the paperwork and phone calls to arrange deliveries between shipping docks or warehouses. It would make shipping more efficient and cheaper not just for its customers, but also for Amazon, which

Link

Amazon grocery store has no cash registers, uses phone

Customers scan the Amazon Go app on their smartphone as they enter the store. The company spent four years developing “just walk out” technology, which detects when items are picked up or returned to shelves and “keeps track of them in a virtual cart,” Amazon said. There’s no checkout line — just leave the store with your groceries, and Amazon will charge your account.

Link

How Muslims Defined American ‘Cool’

“‘Hotel, motel, Holiday Inn’ is not exactly a revolutionary mantra.”

Tracking that line through hip-hop songs is awesome fun. Also, this piece is an important reminder of how huge parts of American culture are evolved and defined, and how much we take them for granted as being “mainstream” once they, well, become mainstream.

Link

The crowded cloud native space

The wider Cloud Native ecosystem is, however, a very disparate and confused place. We anticipate a significant level of consolidation over the next twelve to eighteen months with some clear winners emerging. The emergence of several opinionated distributions of Kubernetes is hardly a surprise and this space will expand a little further before settling down.

Link

The internet of food nutrition labels

“So anyone who is producing food that ends up in our grocery stores, we’re working with them to get the data from their labels and the packaging information to come right into the database for us,” Pamela Stark Reed, deputy administrator for Nutrition, Food Safety and Quality, said on Information Management month.

The database has actually existed for over a century, Reed said. But before starting the initiative, it only had about 8,000 entries. Since opening it up to manufacturer submission, ARS has received 80,000 new items, a 1000 percent increase.
And on future plans:

The goal for the database is to eventually expand to 1,000,000 items. Reed said ARS anticipates getting store brand and international food items into the database soon. Some items from chain restaurants may follow.

Because of this, the agency is looking into cloud services to increase its storage capacity.

Just imagine, globally, how many data sets like that there are. Throw in the workflow to injest and cleanup the data, and change it, plus APIs to access it, and you have an almost endless amount of projects for software eating.

http://federalnewsradio.com/information-management-month/2016/11/usda-turns-nutritional-data-open-data/

SUSE to Acquire HPE’s OpenStack, Cloud Foundry Portfolio, Boost Kubernetes Investment, TheNewStack

“We see PaaS as a strategic component of our software-defined infrastructure and application platform strategy,” stated SUSE President of Strategy, Alliances and Marketing Michael Miller, in a note to The New Stack, “and Cloud Foundry as the open source project and technology that brings together the best innovation and industry collaboration. We want to leverage that innovation for the benefit of our customers, and we have a vision for the convergence of CaaS technologies [in SUSE’s case, Containers as a service] like Docker and Kubernetes and PaaS technologies like Cloud Foundry that we think will address the real-world needs of our customers and partners. We will now work with the Cloud Foundry community to develop that vision.”

http://thenewstack.io/suse-add-hpes-openstack-cloud-foundry-portfolio-boost-kubernetes-investment/