When middle-management is screwing it all up – Pivotal Conversations

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Whether it’s “DevOps,” “digital transformation,” or even “cloud” and “agile,” middle-management is all too common an issue. They simply won’t budge and help out. This isn’t always the case for sure, but “the frozen middle” is a common problem.

With a big ol’ panel of people (including two folks from RedMonk), we talk about tactics for thawing the frozen middle.

The WTF on Cloud-Native from Kenny Bastani and James Governor – Pivotal Conversations

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Check out this talk on “cloud-native”:

We’ve got all your answers to “what exactly is ‘cloud-native’?” in this episode with special guests Pivotal’s Kenny Bastani and RedMonk’s James Governor. Kenny gives us a good overview of what cloud-native is, as Coté summarizes it: handling the configuration and automation for your applications along with all the supporting frameworks and platforms to do that. We then discuss the process (“culture”) angle, the origin of Spring Boot, the concept of “lock-in,” and if public cloud is needed or not. Bonus: serverless talk!

A false choice: systems of record vs. systems of engagement – Pivotal Conversations #49

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What’s the best way to categorize and prioritize your IT projects? Splitting them up between systems of record (ERP) and systems of engagement (user-facing apps) is a popular mode of thinking, highly related to bi-modal IT. In this episode, guest Ian Andrews explains why this framing is a bad idea and offers a value-driven way of thinking about it instead, along with plenty of commentary from Coté and Richard.

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Ian Andrews on bimodal, systems of engagement vs. systems of record

  • Systems of engagement vs systems of record – why is this distinction not helpful based on Ian’s conversations with actual customers. And, of course, bimodal.
  • Spring Boot’s story, and Spring Cloud.
  • Contrasting those with JEE needs shifting. That InfoQ piece Ian references.

Avoid the Ninja Anti-Pattern, Planning Out Your Cloud Platform Project – Pivotal Conversations #48

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How do containers fit into your cloud native planning? That’s a the question we start with this week, with (returning guest) John Feminella. We quickly arrive at a conversation on the larger question which is how to build a cloud platform and the allure of building it yourself. Also, we cover recent news in the infrastructure software space.

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The undying death of JEE – Gartner, app servers, and cloud native – Pivotal Conversation

One of your favorite technologies is on the death wagon, again. Gartner recently recommended avoiding JEE for new, cloud native application development. This predictably kicked up all sorts of push-back from the JEE stalwarts. In this episode we discuss the report, the responses, and all the context to figure out what to make of all this. Spoiler: JEE isn’t dead, as ever, it’s just a part of the ongoing gumbo that is a Java application.

 

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Gartner on JEE for Cloud Native

Solving the instrumentation problem with Spring Sleuth & Zipkin

While at SpringOne Platform I’ve been recording some Pivotal Conversations podcasts: here’s one with Josh McKenty on the Pivotal ecosystem and a bit on using OpenControl for automating compliance. One of the industry nuggets that’s interesting in that is how a die-hard agile company like Pivotal has to adapt how it works with less agile companies. The discussion role of systems integrators is interesting as well.

One for the systems management nerds

Yesterday I recorded one with Marcin Grzejszczak about the work he (and the rest of the team) have been doing to add better tracing and monitoring into all our cloud native stuff with Spring Sleuth, based on Zipkin. Having coding up a bunch of systems management stuff back when I worked at BMC, this topic is weirdly fascinating for me. I like the sound of the work they’re doing there to solve one of the biggest problems with systems management: developers typically do a shitty job writing their code to be easily monitored. Check out by listening below or downloading the MP3 directly:

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The Circle of Code, Pivotal Conversations #27

This week, Richard and I talk about the full, end-to-end process of doing software. Plus, we cover some recent cloud native news:

When you put all of the step needed to create good software up on the board, there’s a lot of them. It’s a lot more than just writing code, or even writing requirements and stories. Around Pivotal, we think of this full, end-to-end process as the circle of code: Ideas → prioritization / planning → coding → deployment → runtime → monitoring → feedback, and back again. Richard and Coté discuss these steps and how organizations are starting to appreciate “the big picture.” They also cover some cloud native news: Amazon buying a browser-based IDE, Cloud9; Google expanding their cloud; and Verizon’s purchase of Yahoo!

024: Analyst relations, how does it work? (Pivotal Conversations)

You’ve heard of “analysts,” those people who cover the technology world with all sorts of quadrants, waves, and forecasts about how much money is spent on different types of software. What industry analysts do is actually a long, interesting list depending on who you are, their customer: a buyer and user of IT, financial and investment banker types, or vendors. This week, after a small section of new left over from last week – are you keeping up here? – we interview Rita Manachi, head of analyst relations at Pivotal. We ask her to go over what analysts do and her tips on working with them.

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