Beyond the Sea of No’s, with Jon Osborn

As always, with Jon, this is a great conversation:

Demonstrating the value of software, how it contributes to revenue, is no easy feat. Staffing can be difficult, especially with an eye to sustaining teams over the years. Jon Osborn returns as a guest to discuss these and other transformation hurdles, plus successes they’ve had at the Great American Insurance Group.

Check it out, and subscribe to the podcast for more stuff like this every week.

Product management in the enterprise

Inside this interview, there’s an excellent explanation of what product management means in an enterprise. By “enterprise,” I mean a company who’s product is not technology. That is, most every company and organization out there. To that end, there’s a great example of doing product management and design at a food services company: discovering the actual problem to solve to meet business needs, and solving it by experimenting with a small batch loop.

See also the original show notes.

What’s knative? Serverless, functional programming, and the like’

I finally got a good overview of what exactly knative is and how it fits into things. Now that I think of it, I’ve forgotten a lot of what it is. But, at the time, this seemed like a satisfying definition by interview.

Serverless! Functions! Knative! What’s it all mean? Nate Schutta explains it all to Coté in this episode, wrapping up with a good explanation of what Knative is and how it fits in with Pivotal Function Serviceand Spring Boot.

And, see the show notes.

Optimistic About Innovation, an interview with Duke Energy’s John Mitchell

To improve the way you do software, I recommend starting up a new organization. It’s not always the right tactic, but it probably is if you’re having problems changing the “culture” at your organization.

Duke Energy has had success with this approach over the years. In one of my recent Pivotal Conversations podcasts, I talked with John Mitchell, who’s been involved in their transformation over the years. They’d just opened a brand new (well, renovated from an old factory) office to host the existing teams (something like 4 or 5 if I recall) and the supporting teams.

Here’s a summary:

Duke Energy has been working on their software capabilities for some time now. They’ve recently reached a milestone by opening a brand new innovation center in Charlotte. Coté took a tour of it recently checking out the numerous product teams and their approach to exploring and building strategy, all the way from corporate strategy down to writing code. John also shares a couple of new examples of how lean product management and design in action. Also: gingham.

Pumping the digital transformation bunny at the US Air Force, an interview with Bryon Kroger

Few organizations have or rely on as much software the US Air Force. There’s plenty of it around and, thus, plenty to be improved. In recent years, one of the more spectacular digital transformation stories has come from the USAF’s work modernizing their Air Operations Control software. In this episode, USAF’s Bryon Kroger goes over how they’ve moved multi-year release cycles to just weeks in the Kessel Run projects. Much of the work is in the “fuzzy front” end of planning and procurement, but as Bryon says, an equally, hearty serving has to do with building up people’s skills, moral, and the overall culture.

One of my recent Pivotal Conversations episodes. There’s a play list collecting together other “customers” talking, rather than the usual of us Pivotal people just talking to ourselves.

Pivotal Conversations: A hopeful view of cloud-native enterprise architecture

Another discussion about what enterprise architecture might mean in a cloud-native world:

It’s probably a good idea to learn about enterprise architecture by talking to someone who’s actually done it. In this episode, we talk with Stuart Charlton, now of Pivotal, but previously of roles where he EA’s, even back in the SOA era! We discuss the mapping of traditional EA to cloud-native, and also some strategies for Coté to increase his Twitter followers, and, as ever, some recent cloud-native news.

Be sure to subscribe!

Pivotal Conversations: It’s private cloud all over again

With no guest, this week Richard and I cover all sorts of things:

There’s some exciting private cloud news on the horizon with Microsoft’s Azure Stack coming out in September. We discuss the brief history of private cloud and several models people have tried, along with some other news from the infrastructure software world. With no guest, Richard and I discuss some projects we’re working from cloud-native .Net, enterprise integration, and enterprise architecture.

Check out the episode!

Pivotal Conversations: The management perspective on transforming Allstate, with Opal Perry

I’m always interested to hear how management manages to change how software is done in large organizations – it can seem impossible! As ever, Allstate provides a fascinating stream of information here, and I was lucky to get the chance to interview Opal Perry there on how Allstate has been doing with all that cloud-native stuff.

Check out the listing on SoundCloud, and be sure to subscribe to the podcast if you like it.

Also, if you want to hear more, Matthew Curry and I had a similar conversation a few weeks ago at OSCON.

Pivotal Conversations: Cloud-native monitoring & PCF Metrics, with Todd Persen

This week’s podcast:

In this episode we talk with Todd Persen on the topic of monitoring cloud-native applications with Pivotal Cloud Foundry Metric. We discuss the changing nature of monitoring in cloud-native platforms, how developers can now turn black-boxes into white-boxes, why time-series dominates the thought-technology in this space now, and the benefits of open source taking over most innovation in systems management. Richard is out this week, so Andrew Shafer returns to fill in as co-host.

Listen above, download the MP3 directly, and/or subscribe to the podcast feed if you haven’t.

Pivotal Conversations: Debunking Cloud Foundry Myths

Our podcast this week:

There’s a whole slurry of myths about Cloud Foundry. With the platform updating so quickly, many of the issues behind these myths have long been addressed, and many were just false from the get-go. Coté and Richard talk about a recent post dismissing common myths. We also discuss recent news from the infrastructure software world and go over a bunch of upcoming events that Pivotal will be at.

If you use something like Overcast, be sure to check out the overly-extensive chapters and links right inside the podcast.

You should subscribe to the podcast!

Pivotal Conversations: “Running like Google,” the CRE Program & Pivotal, with Andrew Shafer

The summary:

What does it really mean to “run like Google”? Is that even a good idea? Andrew Shafer comes back to the podcast to talk with Coté about how the Google SRE book and the newly announced Google CRE program start addressing those questions. We discuss some of the general principals, and “small” ones too that are in those bodies of work and how they represent an interesting evolution of it IT management is done. Many of the concepts that the DevOps and cloud-native community talks about pop in Google’s approach to operations and software delivery, providing a good, hyper-scale case study of how to do IT management and software development for distributed applications. We also discuss Pivotal’s involvement in the Google CRE program.

Check out the SoundCloud listing, or download the MP3 directly.

Pivotal Conversations: Bringing Agility to Enterprise Data Workflows, with Sina Sojoodi

The summary:

This week we talk with about how organizations are increasingly looking to improve how they use data and workflows around data to innovate in their business. As with discuss with our guest, Sina Sojoodi, More than the usual ideas about “big data” and “machine learning,” we talk about the practical uses of data workflows like insurance claims handling and retail optimization. In many large, successful organizations the stacks to support all this processing are aging and not providing the agility businesses want. Of course, as you can guess, we have some suggestions for how to fix those problems, and also how to start thinking about data workflows differently. We also cover some recent news, mostly around Google Cloud Next and Pivotal’s recent momentum announcement.

Check out the SoundCloud page, or download the MP3 directly.

Software Defined Talk: These strategies work well except for when they’re totally fucked

This week’s episode is up:

While it’s unknown how much time you should let your kids play Minecraft, it’s equally unclear at the moment who’ll win the second cloud wars. Between Google, Azure, AWS, and all the others, how companies differentiate themselves and what customers will buy on isn’t sorted just yet. We discuss Google Next, Pivotal’s momentum announcement, and serious theories for Okta IPO’ing.

Subscribe to the feed, download it directly, or listen to it right here:

Check out the full show notes for all the usual extensive links, notes, and bonus links.

When middle-management is screwing it all up – Pivotal Conversations

Whether it’s “DevOps,” “digital transformation,” or even “cloud” and “agile,” middle-management is all too common an issue. They simply won’t budge and help out. This isn’t always the case for sure, but “the frozen middle” is a common problem.

With a big ol’ panel of people (including two folks from RedMonk), we talk about tactics for thawing the frozen middle.

The WTF on Cloud-Native from Kenny Bastani and James Governor – Pivotal Conversations

Check out this talk on “cloud-native”:

We’ve got all your answers to “what exactly is ‘cloud-native’?” in this episode with special guests Pivotal’s Kenny Bastani and RedMonk’s James Governor. Kenny gives us a good overview of what cloud-native is, as Coté summarizes it: handling the configuration and automation for your applications along with all the supporting frameworks and platforms to do that. We then discuss the process (“culture”) angle, the origin of Spring Boot, the concept of “lock-in,” and if public cloud is needed or not. Bonus: serverless talk!

A false choice: systems of record vs. systems of engagement – Pivotal Conversations #49

What’s the best way to categorize and prioritize your IT projects? Splitting them up between systems of record (ERP) and systems of engagement (user-facing apps) is a popular mode of thinking, highly related to bi-modal IT. In this episode, guest Ian Andrews explains why this framing is a bad idea and offers a value-driven way of thinking about it instead, along with plenty of commentary from Coté and Richard.

Subscribe to the podcast feed, check it out in Soundcloud, or listen below:

Subscribe, follow, feedback

News

Ian Andrews on bimodal, systems of engagement vs. systems of record

  • Systems of engagement vs systems of record – why is this distinction not helpful based on Ian’s conversations with actual customers. And, of course, bimodal.
  • Spring Boot’s story, and Spring Cloud.
  • Contrasting those with JEE needs shifting. That InfoQ piece Ian references.

Avoid the Ninja Anti-Pattern, Planning Out Your Cloud Platform Project – Pivotal Conversations #48

How do containers fit into your cloud native planning? That’s a the question we start with this week, with (returning guest) John Feminella. We quickly arrive at a conversation on the larger question which is how to build a cloud platform and the allure of building it yourself. Also, we cover recent news in the infrastructure software space.

Subscribe, follow, feedback

News

The undying death of JEE – Gartner, app servers, and cloud native – Pivotal Conversation

One of your favorite technologies is on the death wagon, again. Gartner recently recommended avoiding JEE for new, cloud native application development. This predictably kicked up all sorts of push-back from the JEE stalwarts. In this episode we discuss the report, the responses, and all the context to figure out what to make of all this. Spoiler: JEE isn’t dead, as ever, it’s just a part of the ongoing gumbo that is a Java application.

 

Subscribe, follow, feedback

News Links

Gartner on JEE for Cloud Native

Solving the instrumentation problem with Spring Sleuth & Zipkin

While at SpringOne Platform I’ve been recording some Pivotal Conversations podcasts: here’s one with Josh McKenty on the Pivotal ecosystem and a bit on using OpenControl for automating compliance. One of the industry nuggets that’s interesting in that is how a die-hard agile company like Pivotal has to adapt how it works with less agile companies. The discussion role of systems integrators is interesting as well.

One for the systems management nerds

Yesterday I recorded one with Marcin Grzejszczak about the work he (and the rest of the team) have been doing to add better tracing and monitoring into all our cloud native stuff with Spring Sleuth, based on Zipkin. Having coding up a bunch of systems management stuff back when I worked at BMC, this topic is weirdly fascinating for me. I like the sound of the work they’re doing there to solve one of the biggest problems with systems management: developers typically do a shitty job writing their code to be easily monitored. Check out by listening below or downloading the MP3 directly:

And, of course, you should subscribe to the feed to get auto-magic downloads!

The Circle of Code, Pivotal Conversations #27

This week, Richard and I talk about the full, end-to-end process of doing software. Plus, we cover some recent cloud native news:

When you put all of the step needed to create good software up on the board, there’s a lot of them. It’s a lot more than just writing code, or even writing requirements and stories. Around Pivotal, we think of this full, end-to-end process as the circle of code: Ideas → prioritization / planning → coding → deployment → runtime → monitoring → feedback, and back again. Richard and Coté discuss these steps and how organizations are starting to appreciate “the big picture.” They also cover some cloud native news: Amazon buying a browser-based IDE, Cloud9; Google expanding their cloud; and Verizon’s purchase of Yahoo!

025: .NET and Beyond 12 Factors with Kevin Hoffman (Pivotal Conversations)

We’ve seen a goodly spate of news in the container space recently which we cover in the episode. In the second half, we talk with Kevin Hoffman about the .NET world, Steel Toe, and his book, Beyond the Twelve-Factor App. A recent survey from the Cloud Foundry Foundation is widening the framing around container management, adding in the use of Platform-as-a-Service into the usual container orchestration mix. The survey also shows some interesting results around adoption, e.g., managing containers in production ends up being more difficult than people predict during evaluations. Also since our last episode, DockerCon brought a bevy of announcements in the container ecosystem which we cover briefly. And highly relevant to our guest, Kevin Hoffman, .NET Core 1.0 was officially released, as open source. In the second half we talk about the recent history of .NET and how it’s being used to create microservices. We also talk about the three extra “factors” Kevin’s book adds to the 12 factor app and typical experiences when migrating to 12 factor apps.

Full show notes: http://pivotal.io/podcast Feeds, archives, etc: https://soundcloud.com/pivotalconversations

Full show notes: pivotal.io/podcast

Download the episode, check it out in iTunes, subscribe to RSS, or check it out in SoundCloud.

024: Analyst relations, how does it work? (Pivotal Conversations)

You’ve heard of “analysts,” those people who cover the technology world with all sorts of quadrants, waves, and forecasts about how much money is spent on different types of software. What industry analysts do is actually a long, interesting list depending on who you are, their customer: a buyer and user of IT, financial and investment banker types, or vendors. This week, after a small section of new left over from last week – are you keeping up here? – we interview Rita Manachi, head of analyst relations at Pivotal. We ask her to go over what analysts do and her tips on working with them.

Check it out in iTunes, subscribe to RSS, or check it out in SoundCloud.