Coté Show #23: “I don’t have a horse or gun.” Or: We were born in Austin. Or: “you may all go to hell. I am going to Texas.”

Another episode of Charles’ and I’s “throw-back” to our Drunk and Retired Podcast days. This one, on the topic of people’s perceptions of Texas abroad.

Check out the show notes for subscription options and links to stuff mentioned in the show.

Software Defined Talk #92: The middle-class metallurgical people – boothing, streaming sportsball, SOASTA, & Cloudera IPO

Check out the latest episode, record last week.

The summary:

Having something to sell is always key to a profitable business. We explore this life-hack of the business world in discussion Twitter and then Amazon licensing Thursday night football. There’s also some brief talk of Akamai buying SOASTA, Cloudera filing to IPO, and the lost dichotomy of agent/agentless.

Pivotal Conversations: “Running like Google,” the CRE Program & Pivotal, with Andrew Shafer

The summary:

What does it really mean to “run like Google”? Is that even a good idea? Andrew Shafer comes back to the podcast to talk with Coté about how the Google SRE book and the newly announced Google CRE program start addressing those questions. We discuss some of the general principals, and “small” ones too that are in those bodies of work and how they represent an interesting evolution of it IT management is done. Many of the concepts that the DevOps and cloud-native community talks about pop in Google’s approach to operations and software delivery, providing a good, hyper-scale case study of how to do IT management and software development for distributed applications. We also discuss Pivotal’s involvement in the Google CRE program.

Check out the SoundCloud listing, or download the MP3 directly.

Pivotal Conversations: Bringing Agility to Enterprise Data Workflows, with Sina Sojoodi

The summary:

This week we talk with about how organizations are increasingly looking to improve how they use data and workflows around data to innovate in their business. As with discuss with our guest, Sina Sojoodi, More than the usual ideas about “big data” and “machine learning,” we talk about the practical uses of data workflows like insurance claims handling and retail optimization. In many large, successful organizations the stacks to support all this processing are aging and not providing the agility businesses want. Of course, as you can guess, we have some suggestions for how to fix those problems, and also how to start thinking about data workflows differently. We also cover some recent news, mostly around Google Cloud Next and Pivotal’s recent momentum announcement.

Check out the SoundCloud page, or download the MP3 directly.

Software Defined Talk: These strategies work well except for when they’re totally fucked

This week’s episode is up:

While it’s unknown how much time you should let your kids play Minecraft, it’s equally unclear at the moment who’ll win the second cloud wars. Between Google, Azure, AWS, and all the others, how companies differentiate themselves and what customers will buy on isn’t sorted just yet. We discuss Google Next, Pivotal’s momentum announcement, and serious theories for Okta IPO’ing.

Subscribe to the feed, download it directly, or listen to it right here:

Check out the full show notes for all the usual extensive links, notes, and bonus links.

Drunk & Retired podcast archives – being a developer in the late 2000’s

You can now check out most all of the episodes of my first podcast, Drunk & Retired, over at archive.org. I’m not sure where episodes 1 to 32 are, but maybe I’ll find them someday.

I did this podcast with my friend Charles Lowell from about 2005 to probably about 2012 or 2010. Once we got big boy jobs and kids, we dropped off, though we went to do other podcasts: Charles has the Frontside podcast, and I have all sorts of other ones.

Every now and then since then we’ve put one out, but really, not that often.

Software Defined Talk: Docker is just cheap VMware, right?

Our new episode is up, from this past Friday:

There’s tell that some people just look at containers as a cheaper way to virtualize, eschewing the fancy-lad “cloud-native stuff.” We discuss that idea, plus “the enterprise cloud wars,” and also our feel that Slack is actually a really good tool and company.

Listen directly, subscribe to the podcast feed, and go check out the full show notes, which has a web player as well.

When middle-management is screwing it all up – Pivotal Conversations

Whether it’s “DevOps,” “digital transformation,” or even “cloud” and “agile,” middle-management is all too common an issue. They simply won’t budge and help out. This isn’t always the case for sure, but “the frozen middle” is a common problem.

With a big ol’ panel of people (including two folks from RedMonk), we talk about tactics for thawing the frozen middle.

The WTF on Cloud-Native from Kenny Bastani and James Governor – Pivotal Conversations

Check out this talk on “cloud-native”:

We’ve got all your answers to “what exactly is ‘cloud-native’?” in this episode with special guests Pivotal’s Kenny Bastani and RedMonk’s James Governor. Kenny gives us a good overview of what cloud-native is, as Coté summarizes it: handling the configuration and automation for your applications along with all the supporting frameworks and platforms to do that. We then discuss the process (“culture”) angle, the origin of Spring Boot, the concept of “lock-in,” and if public cloud is needed or not. Bonus: serverless talk!

Coté Show: Biz Dev, Defining an application, the atheist eagle scout, with JJ Asghar

Another interview, mostly on cloud and other dorky topics:

Having worked in cloud since before cloud, JJ and I talk about what companies are using various cloud things for. We also discuss the conceptual history of cloud, and what exactly he does as a “business development” person at Chef.

Subscribe, tell your friends, or just download the episode directly.

Software Defined Talk: Snap’s cloud billions, Google’s social, Monitoring Startups considered hard, DHS wants your passwords

This week’s episode is out:

Snap is looking to spend billions on AWS and Google Cloud over the next five years. We talk about what exactly that could be for, then check in with Google’s social strategy and thermostat strategies; meanwhile, the America Fuck Yeah crew wants to start gathering passwords at the boarder. Also, Brandon lays out the case that an open-core monitoring startup is a hard row to hoe.Also, Baltimore is not in Maine. (But Coté is pretty sure it actually is.)

Subscribe, tell your friends, or just download directly. Don’t miss the extensive show notes with plenty of bonus links.

A false choice: systems of record vs. systems of engagement – Pivotal Conversations #49

What’s the best way to categorize and prioritize your IT projects? Splitting them up between systems of record (ERP) and systems of engagement (user-facing apps) is a popular mode of thinking, highly related to bi-modal IT. In this episode, guest Ian Andrews explains why this framing is a bad idea and offers a value-driven way of thinking about it instead, along with plenty of commentary from Coté and Richard.

Subscribe to the podcast feed, check it out in Soundcloud, or listen below:

Subscribe, follow, feedback

News

Ian Andrews on bimodal, systems of engagement vs. systems of record

  • Systems of engagement vs systems of record – why is this distinction not helpful based on Ian’s conversations with actual customers. And, of course, bimodal.
  • Spring Boot’s story, and Spring Cloud.
  • Contrasting those with JEE needs shifting. That InfoQ piece Ian references.

Reactive applications, with Josh Long – Coté Show #18

While in San Francisco for a Pivotal meeting, I recorded an episode with Josh Long. We talk about what reactive programming is and why you’d use it. Also, dish towels. Also, check out the livestream of this if you’re into video.

If you haven’t subscribed already, subscribe to the Coté Show. I do little monologs and interviews like this in it, somewhat irregularly.

Avoid the Ninja Anti-Pattern, Planning Out Your Cloud Platform Project – Pivotal Conversations #48

How do containers fit into your cloud native planning? That’s a the question we start with this week, with (returning guest) John Feminella. We quickly arrive at a conversation on the larger question which is how to build a cloud platform and the allure of building it yourself. Also, we cover recent news in the infrastructure software space.

Subscribe, follow, feedback

News

The undying death of JEE – Gartner, app servers, and cloud native – Pivotal Conversation

One of your favorite technologies is on the death wagon, again. Gartner recently recommended avoiding JEE for new, cloud native application development. This predictably kicked up all sorts of push-back from the JEE stalwarts. In this episode we discuss the report, the responses, and all the context to figure out what to make of all this. Spoiler: JEE isn’t dead, as ever, it’s just a part of the ongoing gumbo that is a Java application.

 

Subscribe, follow, feedback

News Links

Gartner on JEE for Cloud Native

073: “My pants are full of brisket,” Apple updates, & Oracle storms the AWS castle – Software Defined Talk

Apple has put out three new things – the phone, the watch, and the OS – which we discuss. And then Oracle announced it’s destroying Amazon, which is fun. We start it all off with a word-salad of the usual nonsense and deodorant talk.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR

  • Check out cote.io/pivotal for free books, free cloud time, etc.
  • Come to DellEMCWorld on Oct 18th to 20th, in Austin. I’ll be speaking there.
  • There’s also the annual vBBQ event, Oct 17th at the Salt Like. Pivotal is sponsoring (check out my CORPORATE AMEX, BITCHES!). Come to it, it’s mostly free-ish.
  • For more DevOps awesomeness, join the Chef Community Summit, October 26th and 27th in Seattle, WA. This Open Space event provides a great opportunity to connect with the DevOps Community and Chef Engineers over two days of engaging sessions and hallway discussions. Bring your ideas, passion and excitement for Chef and DevOps to this highly interactive event. Go to summit.chef.io to register for this awesome event and use the code PODCAST to get 10% off your ticket!

Show notes

WordPress Talk

macOS Sierra

Oracle is gonna cream AWS. Wait, wut?

BONUS LINKS! Not covered in show.

This week in tech PE

Microservices – Please don’t

  • Maybe microservices ain’t all they’re cracked up to be
  • 5 “truths” (spoiler, maybe not)
    1. It keeps the code cleaner
    2. It’s easy to write things that only have one purpose
    3. They’re faster than monoliths
    4. It’s easy for engineers to not all work in the same codebase
    5. It’s the simplest way to handle autoscaling, plus Docker is in here somewhere
  • This piece by my man Kenny is ball-exploding awesome.

Too Old to Code?

  • Tim Bray is old and codes.
  • “That’s fine for you, Marge, but I used to rock and roll all night and party every day. … Now I’m lucky if I can find half an hour a week in which to get funky.”. – Homer Simpson

Recommendations

“Oh! Scurvy! Again.” – Software Defined Talk #72

It’s all fundings, divestitures, and acquisitions this week. Hashicorp gets some cash, HPE sells off it’s software group to Micro Focus, and Google buys Apigee…plus Twitter acquisition rumors. Plus sentient carpets.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

Show Notes

Twitter going to sell:

  • The rumors
  • “I still think Alphabet makes for the most logical acquirer of Twitter”
  • Dark Horse: Apple.
  • Really Dark Horse: IBM.

This Week in Tech PE: HPE Spins off Software

  • They got divested
  • “HPE will be retaining tools that support the company’s cloud and infrastructure businesses but will be spinning off tools for application delivery management, big data, enterprise security, information management, governance and IT operations management.”
  • From what I know of HPE, this seems to be overlapping. I’d love a list of “stays vs. goes”
  • Q3 2017, and you thought Dell/EMC was slow
  • Where does this leave HP? Will they acquire more SW or stay a “systems” company.
  • It makes you realize how “small” their SW group was.
  • Coté’s notebook on this topic.
  • Also, Thoma Bravo says it gets, like, 20-45% returns on assets it takes private.

Mid-roll

  • Check out cote.io/promos for more – free books, free cloud time, etc.
  • Lead-gen free webinar with an actual, real customer talking about cloud and Pivotal Cloud Foundry. An analyst and Coté too.
  • Check out my Sep. column over on The Register, about ROI and shit for DevOps. I’m really desperate to answer this “question.” Put on some high-waders and check out the comments, leave some to go spice it up in that asylum.
  • For more DevOps awesomeness, join the Chef Community Summit, October 26th and 27th in Seattle, WA. This Open Space event provides a great opportunity to connect with the DevOps Community and Chef Engineers over two days of engaging sessions and hallway discussions. Bring your ideas, passion and excitement for Chef and DevOps to this highly interactive event.
  • Go to summit.chef.io to register for this awesome event and use the code PODCAST to get 10% off your ticket!

Google buying Apigee. The whole API Economy thing.

Hashicorp Gets $24 million B-round

Blogging is dead

  • Coté gets better views/reads in Medium than on his broke-dick blog. (Maybe about 80-100 RSS subscribers.)
  • This makes him sad and confused about what he should do.

BONUS LINKS! Not covered in show

A16Z Not Best of the Best?

  • Clickbait
  • “Thought(sp?) it may fall short of some rivals, the company outperforms the average fund: Overall, its three funds have almost doubled their investment capital since inception.”

What’s Cisco Up To?

  • Our favorite Halo Effect company
  • What’s up with “software defined networking”? I was talking with someone recently and they posited that it’s
  • “dead-as-in-over-cause-all-the-big-cos-won.” Plus NSX does a lot (1,700 customers), right?

Short History of Open Source Forks

Thoughts on Nano Windows Server 2016

Moving from Docker to Rocket

Picks

071: Unbreakable Docker, or, elephants, er, like other elephants – Software Defined Talk

Eventually, you have to decide how your open source software is going to make money, and your partners probably won’t like it. That’s what the dust-up around Docker is this week, it seems to us. We also talk briefly about VMware’s big conference this week, and rumors of HPE selling off it’s Software group to private equity.

Check out the full show notes for links to the recommendations, conferences, and tech news items we didn’t get to cover: https://cote.io/sdt71

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR

Show notes

  • Nippers – “Nippers learn about safety at the beach. They learn about dangers such as rocks, and animals (e.g. the blue-ringed octopus), and also about surf conditions, such as rip currents, sandbars, and waves. Older Nippers also learn some basic first aid and may also learn CPR when they reach the age of 13.”

Can someone explain this “Docker forking” hoopla?

  • Coté’s write-up.
  • Docker Inc. doesn’t want to be a commoditized building block
    From a Red Hat person: “The conflict started to escalate earlier this summer, when Docker Inc used its controlling position to push Swarm, it’s own clone of Kubernetes-style container orchestration, into the core Docker project, putting the basic container runtime in a conflict with a notable part of its ecosystem. Docker Inc. then went on to essentially accuse Red Hat of forking Docker – at the Red Hat Summit no less. After that, Docker Inc’s Solomon Hykes came out strongly against the efforts to standardize the container runtime in OCI – an initiative his company co-founded.”
  • Re: that episode where we discuss Docker ecosystem challenges: “Yet on a regular basis, Red Hat patches that enable valid requirements from Red Hat customer use cases get shut down as it seems for the simple reason that they don’t fit into Docker Inc’s business strategy.”
  • A fight over where to draw the line between free/open/commodified and costs/proprietary/competitive: “And while I personally consider the orchestration layer the key to the container paradigm, the right approach here is to keep the orchestration separate from the core container runtime standardization. This avoids conflicts between different layers of the container runtime: we can agree on the common container package format, transport, and execution model without limiting choice between e.g. Kubernetes, Mesos, Swarm.”
  • Don’t bring a pistol to a bazooka fight. Enterprises love RHEL – have you ever tried to sell Ubuntu into organizations? It’s like what selling NT must have been like.

VMware hybrid cloud solutionaring

This Week in Tech Private Equity…

BONUS LINKS! Not covered in podcast.

Spaces vs. Tabs

Recommendations

“No one wants to eat a finger-pie.” – Software Defined Talk #70

This week we discuss Rackspace going private and the OpenStack cloud scenarios that could have been. We also cover Matt Ray’s first trip to New Zealand where, sadly, he finds no Power Ranger monuments. Also, a little bi-modal flavor for ya.

Check out the full show notes (https://cote.io/sdt70) for links to the recommendations, conferences, and tech news items we didn’t get to cover.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR

Show notes

RAX goes private for $4.3bn

OpenStack dead, again.

  • “Tough times ahead”.
  • “There was a time when it was hard to read an article about OpenStack without hearing about ‘pets vs. cattle,’ and OpenStack was designed to herd cattle”
  • “It has itself become a big, complex pet, which is why Mirantis and others can make a living providing services, software and training.”
  • What could have happened: (1.) “we can beat AWS,” or, (2.) “containers, shoulda thought of that.”

Innovation is hard, esp. business-wise

  • How could you compete with AWS?
  • Word vs. Google Docs vs. Office 365.
  • Uber has spent at least $4bn?

BONUS LINKS! Not Covered in show

AWS Sentinel is Coming

  • Skunkworks-ish project from AWS for managed services. Potentially lots of partner conflict
  • “MSPs need to work with customers to convert their infrastructure to Platform-as-a-Service using microservices architecture,” said one AWS partner. “They also need to bring DevOps into the heart of the organization. Unfortunately, most MSPs don’t have the developers that truly understand this.”
  • “Few AWS Partners Are Really Surprised By Sentinel’s Emergence“

MariaDB switches away from open source license

Hashicorp Shuts Down Otto

Microsoft Open Sources Powershell

Recommendations

  • Brandon: first US college football game in Australia
  • Matt: Rugby, help me learn it.
  • Coté: BCG on two speed IT; Wizard of Oz series.

069: The two types of sales dudes you meet in heaven, the IaaS MQ, and layoffs – Software Defined Talk

There’s always good food in the enterprise sales meeting racket: gourmet pimento cheese, sushi and sake, and booze. Also, the Gartner magic quadrant for IaaS in out, which we discuss. With layoffs at Cisco we look at the broader numbers around layoffs in the tech sector. Before recommendations we briefly talk about Walmart buying Jet.

(Sorry the audio quality is so bad.)

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR

Show notes

Gartner IaaS MQ is Out.

Layoffs at Cisco

  • Several thousand get pink slips, more
  • “I do not think that they are going to be done after this.”
  • “We are committed to making the necessary decisions to drive our future growth”
  • The performance didn’t impress investors as Cisco’s stock shed 42 cents to $30.30 in extended trading after the numbers came out. The decline may have been driven by disappointment that Cisco’s job cuts weren’t nearly as deep as published reports had speculated they would be.
  • But it’s not just Cisco.
  • Be sure to read The Halo Effect.

Walmart buys Jet

Recommendations

Too old for the buffet – Software Defined Talk #68

With Matt securely setup in Australia, we get the low-down on the down under. We also discuss rumors of HPE and Rackspace going private and catch up on Verizon buying Yahoo!

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR

Show notes

HPE on the block?

YAHOO!

ChefConf

Recommendations

Building a cloud in 30 minutes, metrics are a distraction, & other tales of transformation at SpringOne Platform – Lords of Computing #14

“I get to see your face during this podcast,” Matt says as we start talking about SpringOne Platform. Both of us were there and we recap Matt’s talk on managing 10 Pivotal Cloud Foundry instances, namely, how they figured out using a Concourse pipeline to automate much of that management. We discuss “how to do the transformation” talks we liked, like the Citi talk.

In addition to some other random digital transformation topics, we also discuss how HR policies are struggling to change with things like pair programming and DevOps.

Subscribe: iTunes, RSS Feed, or download the episode directly.

Show-notes and Links

Solving the instrumentation problem with Spring Sleuth & Zipkin

While at SpringOne Platform I’ve been recording some Pivotal Conversations podcasts: here’s one with Josh McKenty on the Pivotal ecosystem and a bit on using OpenControl for automating compliance. One of the industry nuggets that’s interesting in that is how a die-hard agile company like Pivotal has to adapt how it works with less agile companies. The discussion role of systems integrators is interesting as well.

One for the systems management nerds

Yesterday I recorded one with Marcin Grzejszczak about the work he (and the rest of the team) have been doing to add better tracing and monitoring into all our cloud native stuff with Spring Sleuth, based on Zipkin. Having coding up a bunch of systems management stuff back when I worked at BMC, this topic is weirdly fascinating for me. I like the sound of the work they’re doing there to solve one of the biggest problems with systems management: developers typically do a shitty job writing their code to be easily monitored. Check out by listening below or downloading the MP3 directly:

And, of course, you should subscribe to the feed to get auto-magic downloads!

Open source and developers at Dell and the changing nature of OSS, & Loco Moco, with Barton George – Lords of Computing Podcast #13

I’ve had a theory that the hard-line philosophy of open source has softened in recent times. Rather than thinking closed source is to be avoided at all costs, I think most developer types are a lot more willing to accept closed source bits mixed in with open source bits. That is, open core has “won.” I discuss this topic with my long time pal, Barton George, while at SpringOne Platform, plus the work he’s doing in the developer and OSS worlds at Dell.

We also talk about Hawaiian food.

Subscribe: iTunes, RSS Feed, or download the episode directly.

Show-notes and Links

The Circle of Code, Pivotal Conversations #27

This week, Richard and I talk about the full, end-to-end process of doing software. Plus, we cover some recent cloud native news:

When you put all of the step needed to create good software up on the board, there’s a lot of them. It’s a lot more than just writing code, or even writing requirements and stories. Around Pivotal, we think of this full, end-to-end process as the circle of code: Ideas → prioritization / planning → coding → deployment → runtime → monitoring → feedback, and back again. Richard and Coté discuss these steps and how organizations are starting to appreciate “the big picture.” They also cover some cloud native news: Amazon buying a browser-based IDE, Cloud9; Google expanding their cloud; and Verizon’s purchase of Yahoo!

Pokémon, Ashley Madison, Privacy Shield, Theranos, & me – Guest on Speaking in Tech #219

I was kindly invited to guest co-host and be the guest on this week’s Speaking in Tech. There’s not that many “enterprise IT” focused podcasts out there and this is one of my favorite. Check out the show notes, listen below, or just download the MP3 directly.

As you may recall, I was on for the first time last year, while I was down in Mexico.

025: .NET and Beyond 12 Factors with Kevin Hoffman (Pivotal Conversations)

We’ve seen a goodly spate of news in the container space recently which we cover in the episode. In the second half, we talk with Kevin Hoffman about the .NET world, Steel Toe, and his book, Beyond the Twelve-Factor App. A recent survey from the Cloud Foundry Foundation is widening the framing around container management, adding in the use of Platform-as-a-Service into the usual container orchestration mix. The survey also shows some interesting results around adoption, e.g., managing containers in production ends up being more difficult than people predict during evaluations. Also since our last episode, DockerCon brought a bevy of announcements in the container ecosystem which we cover briefly. And highly relevant to our guest, Kevin Hoffman, .NET Core 1.0 was officially released, as open source. In the second half we talk about the recent history of .NET and how it’s being used to create microservices. We also talk about the three extra “factors” Kevin’s book adds to the 12 factor app and typical experiences when migrating to 12 factor apps.

Full show notes: http://pivotal.io/podcast Feeds, archives, etc: https://soundcloud.com/pivotalconversations

Full show notes: pivotal.io/podcast

Download the episode, check it out in iTunes, subscribe to RSS, or check it out in SoundCloud.

067: Fried chicken, Docker Swarm, tech journalism, or, “but that sweet @MattRay interpolation, tho.” – Software Defined Talk

Is anyone minding the business side of these container orchestration plays? That’s the main topic we discuss after doing over recent Docker announcements. We then discuss the state of tech journalism and throw out a free business plan for left-ish fried chicken slinging.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR

Show notes

Rainbow Chicken vs. Chick-fil-A

  • The “happy meal” barter system.
  • The Left needs some fried chicken chain.

DockerCon

Is there product strategy going on in the container space?

  • Accident-driven intentionality.
  • Yes, they’re building up momentum and then monetization.

Midroll

  • SpringOne Platform – funny name, etc. $300 off registration with code pivotal-cote-300.
  • ChefCon – July 11th and 13th in Austin!

Brook & Bob memorial segment, On the Tech Media

Apple & ZFS

  • More detail than you’d care to want
  • It’s like a story of the ups and (mostly) downs of enterprise infrastructure software. Also, the flirtation nature of announcements that keeps eager nerd-beavers on tender-hooks.

BONUS LINKS! Not covered in show

Infrastructure Software is Dead, or, “With friends like these…”

  • Hard truths from Mirantis
  • “Everybody’s OpenStack software is equally bad.”
  • “But none of this matters, because today customers don’t care about software. Customers care about outcomes.” (Because, you know, they used to not care about outcomes…? Plz. advise.)

Infrastructure Investments by Cloud Service Providers

10 Hour Maintenance Windows on Oracle Cloud?

Operational Best Practices for Serverless

Checking in on CostCo

Recommendations

024: Analyst relations, how does it work? (Pivotal Conversations)

You’ve heard of “analysts,” those people who cover the technology world with all sorts of quadrants, waves, and forecasts about how much money is spent on different types of software. What industry analysts do is actually a long, interesting list depending on who you are, their customer: a buyer and user of IT, financial and investment banker types, or vendors. This week, after a small section of new left over from last week – are you keeping up here? – we interview Rita Manachi, head of analyst relations at Pivotal. We ask her to go over what analysts do and her tips on working with them.

Check it out in iTunes, subscribe to RSS, or check it out in SoundCloud.

066: I-Bankers Smokin’ L’s in the Hot-tub – Software Defined Talk

With two surprise acquisitions this week we have a lot of synergies to discuss. We cover Samsung picking up Joyent, and Microsoft buying LinkedIn. Highly related is a recent article trying to explain what’s going on with private equity buying tech companies. Then, we discuss the big news from chef we’ve been waiting for: the announcement of habitat.

Check out the full show notes for links to the recommendations, conferences, and tech news items we didn’t get to cover: https://cote.io/sdt66.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR

Show notes

Samsung Buys Joyent

  • Joyent notes
  • Coverage from Venturebeat
  • “Until today, we lacked one thing. We lacked the scale required to compete effectively in the large, rapidly growing and fiercely competitive cloud computing market. Now, that changes,”

Microsoft acquires LinkedIn

  • Press Release from Microsoft
  • M&A Synergies Theoretical WTF’ing:
    • Slideshare, extended to all Office formats.
    • Login with LinkedIn + AD = SSO won. Also: “Massively scaling the reach and engagement of LinkedIn by using the network to power the social and identity layers of Microsoft’s ecosystem of over one billion customers. Think about things like LinkedIn’s graph interwoven throughout Outlook, Calendar, Active Directory, Office, Windows, Skype, Dynamics, Cortana, Bing and more.”
    • 433 million professionals in LinkedIn (from MSFT internal memo).
    • …but it’s probably all the same people, tho.
    • “Along with the new growth in our Office 365 commercial and Dynamics businesses this deal is key to our bold ambition to reinvent productivity and business processes.” (MSFT CEO, from MSFT internal memo)
    • Ads and dumb-AI context: “This combination will make it possible for new experiences such as a LinkedIn newsfeed that serves up articles based on the project you are working on and Office suggesting an expert to connect with via LinkedIn to help with a task you’re trying to complete. As these experiences get more intelligent and delightful, the LinkedIn and Office 365 engagement will grow. And in turn, new opportunities will be created for monetization through individual and organization subscriptions and targeted advertising.” (MSFT CEO, from MSFT internal memo)
    • LinkedIn growth since Dec, 2008: “Our team has grown from 338 people to over 10,000, our membership from 32M to over 433M and our revenue from $78M to over $3 billion.” (MSFT internal memo).
    • Others from memo: Lydia training inline in MSFT apps; paid content in MSFT apps (a la Spiceworks); HR and recruiting.
  • Deal PR deck – pretty good. I can see how the social graph and all the “semantic web sit” in LinkedIn, crossed with MSFT assets works well.
  • One take on ads, doesn’t like the Office angle, cause privacy, but oh wait: Google Apps and GMail
  • It’s the 1 dataset MS can keep out of Facebook and Google’s hands.
    https://trackchanges.postlight.com/9-things-microsoft-could-do-with-linkedin-2aec55c2bc72#.iv7cofd13
  • “Microsoft could improve LinkedIn”: Microsoft designs for people who have to do boring things with computers in order to make money. It’s the 9–5 software vendor.
  • Previous big acquisitions: Nokia for $7.2bn, Skype for $8.5bn, Xamarin for $400m.
  • From 451 M&A coverage:
  • I-banker stuff: “Microsoft will pay $196 per share to acquire LinkedIn, a 50% bump up from where it was trading ahead of the deal announcement, although well behind the $250 each share was worth in November. The price tag values LinkedIn at 8.2x trailing revenue.”
  • “The company [Microsoft] must find new ways to differentiate. Integrations with LinkedIn offer potential functionality that will be challenging to duplicate. When the two companies are joined, there will be multiple ways that LinkedIn’s member network, and the data from that, will go into improving Microsoft’s Office and Dynamics apps, besides the other benefits from running a combined company.”
  • “LinkedIn’s tools for recruiters account for 58% of the $860m in revenue it generated in the first quarter of the year [so, $3.440bn run rate]. When combined with educational material from its Lynda.com acquisition, HCM tools make up 65% of sales. Tools for marketers and premium subscriptions (including its offering for sales teams) each make up less than 20% of the business, and are the slowest growing parts of the business.”
  • “Microsoft is the world’s largest software developer, with about $100bn in sales and a $400bn market cap.”
  • I-Bankers rejoice!
  • Tim Anderson inadvertantly makes a good case of CRM/HCM

Private Equity buying Tech Companies

bignews.chef.io

Mid-roll

BONUS LINKS! Not covered in show.

What enterprise wants from Google’s cloud

  • Google, in short, needs to learn to be boring
  • according to Gartner analyst Lydia Leong: “Azure almost always loses tech evals to AWS hands-down, but guess what? They still win deals. Business isn’t tech-only.” What a weird thread that is!
  • “Greene is also tapping her VMware Rolodex, talking with big enterprise rivals like SAP SE, Microsoft and Oracle, to get more of their products into the Google cloud. That’s must-have for some large companies, which need prepackaged software from these providers to run their businesses. No Oracle or SAP products are available on Google’s cloud today. Microsoft and Oracle declined to comment, while SAP confirmed early talks.” From Jack Clark’s Bloomberg piece.

Docker, K8s and Mesos as Interoperability Targets

Meta Podcast Stuff

Apple Announcement

Recommendations

065: The High-level WTF on “Scheduling”

We spend this week talking about workload scheduling, starting with Mesos. It’s a fun ride from CONTROL-M to Lambda, along with Cloud Foundry and serverless. So get ready to beat a horse into glue. Plus, how to handle gifts for father’s day and the usual recommendations at the end.

Check out the full show notes for links to the recommendations, conferences, and tech news items we didn’t get to cover.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR

Show notes

Father’s Day

MesosCon

  • Platform Infrastructure at Twitter: The Past, Present and – Future – Chris Pinkham, VP of Engineering, Twitter
  • Forgot to talk about this, but here are my notes from the MesosCon presentation by Twitter
  • Former Nimbula founder (Oracle acquisition), early AWS founder.
  • Twitter’s kinda big deal, maybe you’ve heard of them. Over 1000 services manage Twitter, over 1,000,000 cores.
  • http://twitter.github.io
  • Heron is a newly open-sourced replacement for Storm. Supporting all of our own code isn’t sustainable, need an open source community.
  • The Ellen Degeneres photo tweet from the 2015 Academy Awards knocked a couple of services over. 25% traffic spike, hit 255k/tweets per second. 2016 Academy Awards had 2x the traffic, no failures.
  • 30,000 node Mesos cluster (probably largest). “We don’t like being the biggest of anything, we find the edge cases.” 130,000,000 containers launched daily.
  • Some of their acquisitions were in public cloud, they don’t move them in-house. They’re actually pushing new services out to AWS where they can. Vine, TellApart, Crashlytics, MoPub, BlueFin, etc. Ad-serving is mostly in AWS.
    Users: Time Warner, Twitter (30,000 host deployment), Apple Siri.

What exactly is scheduling?

  • BMC CONTROL-M
  • Coté gets Matt to “checks out” his crudes understanding. (Spoiler: Checks out.)

Serverless, what’s the deal?

Mid-roll

BONUS LINKS!

Not covered in show:

Somebody’s using Kubernetes

  • Hear the tale!
  • Concur & Barkly Protects
  • Both shops did customizations to the codebase (AWS AZ & ELB support, Prometheus)

AWS & Australia News

Coté’s revamped Pivotal Conversations Podcast

Typosquatting Package Managers

  • Seriously messed up.
  • “In the thesis itself, several powerful methods to defend against typo squatting attacks are discussed. Therefore they are not included in this blog post.”

A Docker on every HPE Server

  • Running on HPE
  • Reference Architectures!
  • HPE 3PAR and SiteScope plugins!
  • Maybe Brandon can regale us with some history: tales of The Mercury Wars!
  • Also, some ALM stuff. Sadly, I don’t have access to the IDC reports on this, however, they’re expecting big things: “IDC’s analysis of this market resulted in worldwide agile application life-cycle management software 2014 revenue of $450.3 million, up 30.5% from the 2013 revenue of $345 million. IDC expects very strong growth for agile ALM software for the 2014–2019 time frame, with growth to $1.8 billion by 2019 and a high CAGR of 32%”
  • erry-one doin’ it! What’s up with Chef’s ALM/CD stuff? Pivotal circle of code vision, with ConcourseCI.

Recommendations

064: Residential Diaper Rash – Software Defined Talk

While Texas moistens up, we talk about the morals of rich tech folks suing journalists, the state of open source business, the history of the BI market, and how to use the Meeker decks. Check out the full show notes for links to the recommendations, conferences, and tech news items we didn’t get to cover.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR

Show notes

“Residential Diaper Rash”

Battling Billionaires

Making money in open source

Mid-roll

Notes from Corporate Strategy Land

Mary Meeker’s 2016 Internet Trends Report

  • Video of the presentation
  • Quartz highlights
    • Software is getting faster at eating the (ecommerce) world: “The time it takes retailers to get to $100 million in online sales is shrinking. It took Nike 14 years from the time its retail site launched, compared to nine years for Lululemon, and eight year for Under Armour.”
  • 213 slides of charts (PDF).

BONUS LINKS!

Recommendations