Pivotal Conversations: Debunking Cloud Foundry Myths

Our podcast this week:

There’s a whole slurry of myths about Cloud Foundry. With the platform updating so quickly, many of the issues behind these myths have long been addressed, and many were just false from the get-go. Coté and Richard talk about a recent post dismissing common myths. We also discuss recent news from the infrastructure software world and go over a bunch of upcoming events that Pivotal will be at.

If you use something like Overcast, be sure to check out the overly-extensive chapters and links right inside the podcast.

You should subscribe to the podcast!

Pivotal Conversations: “Running like Google,” the CRE Program & Pivotal, with Andrew Shafer

The summary:

What does it really mean to “run like Google”? Is that even a good idea? Andrew Shafer comes back to the podcast to talk with Coté about how the Google SRE book and the newly announced Google CRE program start addressing those questions. We discuss some of the general principals, and “small” ones too that are in those bodies of work and how they represent an interesting evolution of it IT management is done. Many of the concepts that the DevOps and cloud-native community talks about pop in Google’s approach to operations and software delivery, providing a good, hyper-scale case study of how to do IT management and software development for distributed applications. We also discuss Pivotal’s involvement in the Google CRE program.

Check out the SoundCloud listing, or download the MP3 directly.

Pivotal Conversations: Bringing Agility to Enterprise Data Workflows, with Sina Sojoodi

The summary:

This week we talk with about how organizations are increasingly looking to improve how they use data and workflows around data to innovate in their business. As with discuss with our guest, Sina Sojoodi, More than the usual ideas about “big data” and “machine learning,” we talk about the practical uses of data workflows like insurance claims handling and retail optimization. In many large, successful organizations the stacks to support all this processing are aging and not providing the agility businesses want. Of course, as you can guess, we have some suggestions for how to fix those problems, and also how to start thinking about data workflows differently. We also cover some recent news, mostly around Google Cloud Next and Pivotal’s recent momentum announcement.

Check out the SoundCloud page, or download the MP3 directly.

Software Defined Talk: These strategies work well except for when they’re totally fucked

This week’s episode is up:

While it’s unknown how much time you should let your kids play Minecraft, it’s equally unclear at the moment who’ll win the second cloud wars. Between Google, Azure, AWS, and all the others, how companies differentiate themselves and what customers will buy on isn’t sorted just yet. We discuss Google Next, Pivotal’s momentum announcement, and serious theories for Okta IPO’ing.

Subscribe to the feed, download it directly, or listen to it right here:

Check out the full show notes for all the usual extensive links, notes, and bonus links.

When middle-management is screwing it all up – Pivotal Conversations

Whether it’s “DevOps,” “digital transformation,” or even “cloud” and “agile,” middle-management is all too common an issue. They simply won’t budge and help out. This isn’t always the case for sure, but “the frozen middle” is a common problem.

With a big ol’ panel of people (including two folks from RedMonk), we talk about tactics for thawing the frozen middle.

The WTF on Cloud-Native from Kenny Bastani and James Governor – Pivotal Conversations

Check out this talk on “cloud-native”:

We’ve got all your answers to “what exactly is ‘cloud-native’?” in this episode with special guests Pivotal’s Kenny Bastani and RedMonk’s James Governor. Kenny gives us a good overview of what cloud-native is, as Coté summarizes it: handling the configuration and automation for your applications along with all the supporting frameworks and platforms to do that. We then discuss the process (“culture”) angle, the origin of Spring Boot, the concept of “lock-in,” and if public cloud is needed or not. Bonus: serverless talk!

025: .NET and Beyond 12 Factors with Kevin Hoffman (Pivotal Conversations)

We’ve seen a goodly spate of news in the container space recently which we cover in the episode. In the second half, we talk with Kevin Hoffman about the .NET world, Steel Toe, and his book, Beyond the Twelve-Factor App. A recent survey from the Cloud Foundry Foundation is widening the framing around container management, adding in the use of Platform-as-a-Service into the usual container orchestration mix. The survey also shows some interesting results around adoption, e.g., managing containers in production ends up being more difficult than people predict during evaluations. Also since our last episode, DockerCon brought a bevy of announcements in the container ecosystem which we cover briefly. And highly relevant to our guest, Kevin Hoffman, .NET Core 1.0 was officially released, as open source. In the second half we talk about the recent history of .NET and how it’s being used to create microservices. We also talk about the three extra “factors” Kevin’s book adds to the 12 factor app and typical experiences when migrating to 12 factor apps.

Full show notes: http://pivotal.io/podcast Feeds, archives, etc: https://soundcloud.com/pivotalconversations

Full show notes: pivotal.io/podcast

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