Link: Agile Strategy: Short-Cycle Strategy Development and Execution

Kind of a good list of how to align short, agile cycles to longer, strategic planning. Key, I think, is understanding the stability and predictably needs of strategic planning and explaining how short agile loops increase the confidence the corporate can have in both it’s plans and better intelligence about the market and what works.

“In practice, the lack of continuous feedback loops between operational units and C-suite leaders leads to the misalignment of resources. Lack of communication makes course adjustment nearly impossible.”
Original source: Agile Strategy: Short-Cycle Strategy Development and Execution

Link: The My Health Record story no politician should miss

“Early signs of Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia would mean the end of a political career, perhaps rightly so. But with all the taboos still surrounding mental health, signs of less dramatic conditions could be used as political leverage. A prescription for an anti-psychotic medication, say, or even just a series of appointments with a psychiatrist known to specialise in these disorders. The timing of medical treatment can also reveal politically problematic patterns of activity. Prescriptions for erectile dysfunction pills would be perfectly reasonable for a male in his 60s or beyond, although they’d doubtless trigger embarrassing comments about flaccid policies. But what if the politician was married, the prescriptions were always in the weeks before overseas missions, and after the last such trip there was a series of weekly visits to a sexual health clinic? Infidelity can kill a career.”
Original source: The My Health Record story no politician should miss

Link: The My Health Record story no politician should miss

“Early signs of Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia would mean the end of a political career, perhaps rightly so. But with all the taboos still surrounding mental health, signs of less dramatic conditions could be used as political leverage. A prescription for an anti-psychotic medication, say, or even just a series of appointments with a psychiatrist known to specialise in these disorders. The timing of medical treatment can also reveal politically problematic patterns of activity. Prescriptions for erectile dysfunction pills would be perfectly reasonable for a male in his 60s or beyond, although they’d doubtless trigger embarrassing comments about flaccid policies. But what if the politician was married, the prescriptions were always in the weeks before overseas missions, and after the last such trip there was a series of weekly visits to a sexual health clinic? Infidelity can kill a career.”
Original source: The My Health Record story no politician should miss

Link: Store scanning robots will get AI, object recognition boost with recent acquisition

“Savvides is charged with advancing Bossa Nova’s product recognition capabilities at scale and identifying out-of-stock and misplaced products. Bossa Nova’s robots rove stores scanning shelves and alerting managers to any issues with inventory, including misplaced or low-stock items. As I’ve written, the robots are also Big Data mining machines writ small, able to track product performance practically in real-time.”
Original source: Store scanning robots will get AI, object recognition boost with recent acquisition

Link: Employees should work on hard things, not easy things

‘For a business to thrive, each employee must ultimately be worth three times their wages to the business. That means if someone is getting paid $60k per year, their worth to the business likely exceeds $180k. People often underestimate what they are worth. One way people, especially more junior employees, underestimate themselves is by failing to spend most of their time on things that are really hard for them to do. All employees (not just entry level employees) should strive to have at least 70% of their time doing things that are really difficult. These are the tasks that require the most thought, rigor, and attention. And these are the tasks that result in the most growth.’

Of course, this assumes a capitalist view of work. Work is there to generate profit, not help people pass the time (find value in being alive) and making sure they have the means to eat and such.
Original source: Employees should work on hard things, not easy things

Link: On Preferring A to B, while also preferring B to A

‘There is a tendency to think that joint evaluation is always better since it is the “full information” condition. Sunstein pushes against this interpretation because he argues that full information doesn’t mean full rationality.’

Placing value on something is situational and filled mostly with personal (or organization) judgement.
Original source: On Preferring A to B, while also preferring B to A

Link: Res Obscura: Nassim Nicholas Taleb vs. Historians

“But again, leaving these points aside – Taleb is arguing with a nonexistent group of people here. He has somehow convinced himself that academic historians are a bunch of nerds sitting in library stacks, getting angry at current events, and channeling their frustration about the world into a vision of the past that sees everything as conflict, and ignores all the fun collaborations between barbers, prostitutes, and merchants. This is precisely the opposite of the vision of academic history that I got from grad school, and the vision that I teach in my classes at UC Santa Cruz. Now, keep in mind that I’m arguing from my own experiences here and those of my most outspoken friends, and hence I assume that Taleb, if he reads this, will accuse me of “overfitting” as well. But I have to wonder – what is he basing his expertise on? A public spat with Mary Beard and perhaps a few bad encounters in NYU hallways, squared against Taleb’s newfound love for Bloch, Braudel, and A History of Private Life.”

Summary: citations. Always include citations.
Original source: Res Obscura: Nassim Nicholas Taleb vs. Historians