Don’t be a jerk, leave us a five star rating in iTunes – Software Defined Talk #49

Summary

After discussing a new podcasting network based on annoying listeners as much as possible (one word: walnuts), we discuss the latest in OSS FUD, what Atlassian’s IPO will mean for related tech companies, and Chef’s product portfolio expansion into two new areas.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed, or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: check out Coté’s three part webinar on getting your cloud strategy right: the cloud native journey. It’s divided into greenfield projects, legacy projects, and tackling IT department transformation. Don’t screw up your cloud strategy, let your competition do that instead. Check out the series at https://cote.io/pivotal.

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BONUS LINKS! Not covered in episode

Recommendations

Are there ways of being paranoid without being an asshole? Or, All your hot takes are belong to us – Software Defined Talk #45

Summary


After discussing the horns of moses and beard butter, we talk about how big companies seem to always “miss it.” We use a recent write-up of Nokia as the launching point, and sort of conclude that the problem is: people get fat and happy and don’t stay “paranoid” enough. We also discuss Ad Blocking and how little most tech vendor marketers probably care about the topic. Brandon gives a good rant on how to do marketing right: have a great product.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Want to go to the Chef Community Summits? There’s one in Seattle Oct. 14th and 15th and in London Nov. 3rd to 4th. Register with the code SOFTWARE to get 20% off!

SPONSOR: Take our awesome, multi-cloud PaaS for a test-ride. Get two free months of Pivotal Web Services. Whether you want to deploy on-premises, in a dedicated public cloud, or just keep using our PaaS, Pivotal Cloud Foundry has everything you need for doing cloud-native applications. Go to cote.io/pivotal for the sign-up code!

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BONUS LINKS not covered in podcast

Recommendations

  • Brandon: Global Entry is totally worth it. Also, The Magic Kingdom at Disney World.
  • Matt: new noise canceling headphones, Bose QuietComfort 20 .
  • Coté: you can now get uncooked black beans at CostCo.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/5zGMwf_bAzY?rel=0

“The concerned citizen super coder,” or, transforming how the US government does software, Diego Lapiduz – Lords of Computing Podcast #008

Summary

What organization could be larger than the US Federal government? Not only that, the chance to transform how software is done in the government has perhaps one of the largest possible impacts of transforming any “IT department.” In this episode, Matt and Coté talk with Diego Lapiduz who works in the GSA’s 18F organization helping government agencies develop their software in new, more agile and cloud-driven ways. We discuss the background of 18F and the broader government initiatives to transform how software is done and also walk through some of the learnings 18F has had in trying to make such a huge transformation.

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Show-notes and Links

Picasso didn’t have markdown, or, “Matt Ray’s DevOps World” – Software Defined Talk #44

Summary

What went wrong with Evernote? We winsomely open up discussing that and the inevitable markdown commentary. We also discuss the incomprehensible (to Coté nature of security), HP shedding 30,000 jobs, and beef.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Want to go to the Chef Community Summits? There’s one in Seattle Oct. 14th and 15th and in London Nov. 3rd to 4th. Register with the code SOFTWARE to get 20% off!

SPONSOR: Take our awesome, multi-cloud PaaS for a test-ride. Get two free months of Pivotal Web Services. Whether you want to deploy on-premises, in a dedicated public cloud, or just keep using our PaaS, Pivotal Cloud Foundry has everything you need for doing cloud-native applications. Go to cote.io/pivotal for the sign-up code!

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BONUS LINKS

Announcements

Recommendations

Getting beyond “the comfort of the number.” – Lords of Computing Podcast #007

Summary

In this first part of a new series, Matt Curry and I discuss many of the problems with transforming how a large company uses IT. From dealing with businesses cases, the finance department, and changing how the business thinks about using IT, there are numerous organizational change problems to chew on. This launches a new series of episodes in Lords of Computing where Matt and I will talk interview various folks out there who are going through transformation at their company. We’re interested in hearing what’s work and not worked for them.

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Show-notes and Links

Talking DevOps ROI with the Finance Department

I followed up my recent column on DevOps ROI with a podcast on the topic. Back from the podcasting dead, I called up Ed who is actually a real, live “finance person” to walk through what ROI is and how you’d calculate it for something like DevOps. As ever with Ed, it’s a great conversations.

Check out the episode listing over on the Pivotal blog for full show notes and the feed to subscribe to if you want more from my Pivotal Conversations podcast.

Bootleg recordings of VMworld 2015 panels – this and other tips on relating to your fellow person – Software Defined Talk

Summary

We figure out our Wal-mart greeter job for our never-retirement. After a discussion of a new type of expert witness we cover Chef’s funding, VMworld and Photon, and what’s left to do in SSO and identity management.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Want to go to the Chef Community Summits? There’s one in Seattle Oct. 14th and 15th and in London Nov. 3rd to 4th. Register with the code SOFTWARE to get 20% off!

SPONSOR: Take our awesome, multi-cloud PaaS for a test-ride. Get two free months of Pivotal Web Services. Whether you want to deploy on-premises, in a dedicated public cloud, or just keep using our PaaS, Pivotal Cloud Foundry has everything you need for doing cloud-native applications. Go to cote.io/pivotal for the sign-up code!

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BONUS LINKS!

Recommendations

Coté: Beef.
Matt: Rube Waddell episode of The Dollop is a Hilarious discussion of the life of one of the greatest & craziest baseball players to have every lived. Strikeout leader, perfect inning, chasing fire trucks, multiple wives, learning to throw at birds.
Brandon: woot.com. Getcheraself a TV there.

Can you click in emacs? – Software Defined Talk #42

Summary

With VMworld coming up next week we talk tactics for surviving the show floor, Microsoft’s cloud and container offerings, and the battle for defining the fragmented “platform” space.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Want to go to the Chef Community Summits? There’s one in Seattle Oct. 14th and 15th and in London Nov. 3rd to 4th. Register with the code SOFTWARE to get 20% off!

SPONSOR: Take our awesome, multi-cloud PaaS for a test-ride. Get two free months of Pivotal Web Services. Whether you want to deploy on-premises, in a dedicated public cloud, or just keep using our PaaS, Pivotal Cloud Foundry has everything you need for doing cloud-native applications. Go to cote.io/pivotal for the sign-up code!

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Recommendations

The Software Nihilist – Software Defined Talk #41

Summary

After finally settling an important RescueBots debate, we discuss keeping optimistic in the tech industry. And there’s much to be (potentially) cynical about: bad work conditions at Amazon and the tech industry as whole, inscrutable restructuring at Google, and rumored fire-sales in the APM space. With a trust, detailed taxonomy of nihilism, somehow, we manage to keep it together nonetheless.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Take our awesome, multi-cloud PaaS for a test-ride. Get two free months of Pivotal Web Services. Whether you want to deploy on-premises, in a dedicated public cloud, or just keep using our PaaS, Pivotal Cloud Foundry has everything you need for doing cloud-native applications. Go to cote.io/pivotal for the sign-up code!

SPONSOR: Want to go to the Chef Community Summits? There’s one in Seattle Oct. 14th and 15th and in London Nov. 3rd to 4th. Register with the code SOFTWARE to get 20% off!

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BONUS LINKS NOT COVERED IN SHOW!

Recommendations

040: Software is awesome – Software Defined Talk

Summary

When you can pay the sprinkler repair guy by using your finger to sign an iPad, things are looking up. Maybe it means we’ll have lots of microservices wrapped around government services, who knows. Also, we cover the strategy of choosing boring technologies, MongoDB, and The EMC Federation.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Take our awesome, multi-cloud PaaS for a test-ride. Get two free months of Pivotal Web Services. Whether you want to deploy on-premises, in a dedicated public cloud, or just keep using our PaaS, Pivotal Cloud Foundry has everything you need for doing cloud-native applications. Go to cote.io/pivotal for the sign-up code!

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BONUS LINKS! Not covered in podcast

Recommendations

039: Whatever happened to being profitable? Also, HP, the GPL, GitHub, and Citrix – Software Defined Talk Podcast

Summary

Once we settle the important topic of lawn management in Texas, we discuss the circus around HP dress codes (and the actual lack of them), HP/Stackato, GitHub and the ALM market, and the odd fate of the GPL in commercial software land.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Take our awesome, multi-cloud PaaS for a test-ride. Get two free months of Pivotal Web Services. Whether you want to deploy on-premises, in a dedicated public cloud, or just keep using our PaaS, Pivotal Cloud Foundry has everything you need for doing cloud-native applications. Go to cote.io/pivotal for the sign-up code!

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BONUS LINKS not covered in show

Recommendations

Loading up on hot-dogs, the cloud boys of summer, peak foundation

Untitled//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Summary

Can you ever go back to just writing code? We discuss. With the launch of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, we discuss how it relates to other foundations and cloud-land in general. We also talk about who’s not in the open cloud club, like Digital Ocean, and how things might pan out for them. And, of course, a little bit of OpenStack.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Take our awesome, multi-cloud PaaS for a test-ride. Get two free months of Pivotal Web Services. Whether you want to deploy on-premises, in a dedicated public cloud, or just keep using our PaaS, Pivotal Cloud Foundry has everything you need for doing cloud-native applications. Go to cote.io/pivotal for the sign-up code!

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Show notes

The OpenStack Update

The K Word

Digital Ocean, what’s up with them?

  • Meanwhile in cloud: Digital Ocean and trolling OpenStack
    Digital Ocean raising $83 million
  • Not using OCP, Not using OpenStack, could open source: “At some point in the future, it would be good to see other open-source frameworks take a run at OpenStack, since today I feel like they [OpenStack] are the only game in town,” Uretsky said. “We come from the open-source world and would like to be able to contribute a project that actually delivers real value.” Dude don’t like OpenStack, yo.
  • “[T]he business is fundamentally solid with profit margins that exceed those of Amazon’s Web Services”<- how do they know?

DevOps and Windows NT Patching

The Coté & Matt Ray Financials Bump?

BONUS LINKS!

Recommendations

  • Brandon: Mr. Robot, the TV show.
  • Matt: Slack, more or less.
  • Coté: chili powder on watermelon.

The converging Red Hat stack, Go, and those damn analysts – Software Defined Talk #37

Summary

This week, we discuss Red Hat and it’s slow and steady nature. We also talk about RedMonk’s programming language ranking and the role of Go in infrastructure software, recent industry analyst ranking, calendars, and our recommendations as always.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Take our awesome, multi-cloud PaaS for a test-ride. Get two free months of Pivotal Web Services. Whether you want to deploy on-premises, in a dedicated public cloud, or just keep using our PaaS, Pivotal Cloud Foundry has everything you need for doing cloud-native applications. Go to cote.io/pivotal for the sign-up code!

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Show notes

DevOpsDays Amsterdam - Thursday June 25th

RedMonk Programming Language Index

Thoughts on the Red Hat Summit?

Rating analyst firms considered dangerous?

  • Check out the comments on this recent IIAR ranking of firms for the usual fighting about analysts…
  • Including the analysts of analysts poking each other in the eye… IIAR, Duncan, and KCG. Keep it classy!

BONUS LINKS!

  • RUMOR: Digital Ocean raises $83 million – “Today, DigitalOcean is ranked as the third largest hosting company in the world in terms of number of web sites hosted, behind Amazon Web Services and French company OVH, and has grown 14x in the last year, from 10,000 sites hosted to 140,000.” – “…bringing its overall funding to $90.4 million”

Recommendations

Coté’s Book, on How to Be Coté…by Coté. Also, DockerCon & ROI – Software Defined Talk #36

Summary

After discussing which days holidays usually land on, we discuss the news out of DockerCon, along with some unicorn talk based on a recent a16z chart-fest of tech funding. Then we talk ROI. It’s riveting!

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Take our awesome, multi-cloud PaaS for a test-ride. Get two free months of Pivotal Web Services. Whether you want to deploy on-premises, in a dedicated public cloud, or just keep using our PaaS, Pivotal Cloud Foundry has everything you need for doing cloud-native applications. Go to cote.io/pivotal for the sign-up code!

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Show notes

“Rise of the infrastructure plumbers”

It’s DockerCon this week…

A16Z U.S. Technology Funding — What’s Going On?

What’s “ROI”?

  • I’ve been trying to figure this out of late.
  • Saving money on one option vs. another?
  • Creating growth?
  • Proof that you made a good choice?
  • ROI = (Gains – Cost)/Cost; e.g. ($20,000 – $10,000)/$10,000 = 100% ROI (yes, I made it a percentage, math nerds)
  • Theory: ROI is only a useful metric for comparing costs of things, and if the gain is well understood and predictable.

Misc.

Recommendations

Try to avoid killing your acquisition. Also, getting VC cash. – Lords of Computing Podcast #006

Summary

After catching up about movies and OpenStack, John and I discuss how difficult it is to properly integrate acquired companies into the larger company. We also discuss what VCs are looking for to say yes now: a good team, it seems.

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Show-notes and Links

Our love/hate relationship with whitepapers, mostly hate – Software Defined Talk #35

Summary

We discuss the evolving role of whitepapers, the spate of OpenStack startup acquisitions, Cisco Live, and cloud identity. Also, some robot recommendations.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Want to start figuring out cloud-native application development? Get two months free of Pivotal Web Services, and also find out more about Pivotal here: https://cote.io/pivotal.

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Show notes

Recommendations

https://www.youtube.com/embed/W6eXjV__OVs

Public or private cloud, pick your poison – Software Defined Talk #033

Summary

This week, we talk about some recent conferences and the ages old question: public or private?

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: If you’re in Brazil, come check out the Pivotal roadshows next week in Rio on May 19th and Sao Paolo on May 21st. Coté will be covering Pivotal Cloud Foundry and becoming a software defined business, there’s also Pivotal Data folks and content!

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Show notes

BONUS LINKS, not covered in show

  • Shingy’s in play! Verizon rumored to be buying AOL – also, some brief strategy theories: “Verizon needs a large-scale, fully functional, data-driven content distribution platform and it needs it now… Verizon is nowhere near done acquiring assets to help it realize its strategic requirement to turn information into action for advertisers and consumers alike.”
  • John Chambers retiring.
  • Citrix Synergy – speaking of CloudStack… “Today it has 1,900 active service providers delivering some 500,000 apps and services.” Looks like they have some general cloud management/provisioning stuff: “Mulchandani showed off the 110-step blueprint inside of the Lifecycle Management feature of Workspace Cloud that tells it how to deploy the XenDesktop broker to a production environment, and these same blue prints can be created for other applications – including the deployment of something as complex as a Hadoop cluster if customers want to do that.” And read a general update on CloudStack from back in April, include some quotes from Mark Hinkle.
  • Rumors of Yelp on the block – “That’s about $400 million raised from investors for a company that today has a market value of $3.51 billion. Yelp did manage to make an annual profit for the first time in 2014, but it has also still reported total losses of $34 million over its history, according to its securities filings.”

Recommendations

The uncanny valley of Hamburglars – Software Defined Talk #032

Summary

Is there such a thing as a too creepy Hamburgler? We think not. Also, we cover what happened at DevOpsDays Austin, the identity management gap, and rumors about someone acquiring Salesforce.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Come check out the Cloud Foundry Summit, a great chance to not only learn about the cloud platform but also hear about how people are using it. It’s May 11th and 12th in Santa Clara. Use the discount code COTE to get 25% of registration.

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Show notes

Bonus Links, not covered this week

Recommendations

DevOps and Coffee in Salt Lake

In this week’s Pivotal Conversations podcast, Andrew and I talk about the history of DevOps and how it’s doing now. Aside for a good recommendation for coffee in Salt Lake, the part that stuck with me most is that we might as well start thinking about DevOps and continious delivery as the same thing. Sure, they’re not perfectly so, but it’s close enough for me. That’s an idea I’m going to float at DevOpsDays Austin next week and see where it takes us.

Check out the show notes for a full transcript and links we mentioned.

#adulting, & Public cloud looks like a good business and “containers” – Software Defined Talk #031

Summary

We discuss Amazon Web Service’s financials – is it a lot, a little? How does AWS stack up against the competition and how do you even make a consistent market share pie. Also, we preview DevOpsDays Austin and talk about container management layers like VMware’s Photon and Cloud Foundry Lattice.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Come check out the Cloud Foundry Summit, a great chance to not only learn about the cloud platform but also hear about how people are using it. It’s May 11th and 12th in Santa Clara. Use the discount code COTE to get 25% of registration.

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Show notes

AWS Numbers

Container Land

Briefings

DevOpsDays Austin

BONUS LINKS! (Not covered in show)

Recommendations

When the practice of using the tool is novel, thought-lording new technologies – Lords of Computing #5

We discuss how you (slowly) introduce new technologies into the market by looking at past tech cycles John has gone through. We also catch-up on the Craft conference and John’s travels in Europe.

SPONSOR: Come check out the Cloud Foundry Summit, May 11th and 12th. You’ll hear how companies are using Cloud Foundry to create software defined businesses and get the latest technical details on Cloud Foundry. Register with the code COTE to get 25% off!

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“I have become the hustler,” Robert Brook – Lord of Computing Podcast #004

Summary

It can take a long time to get “the mainstream” to use new technologies. One would assume that this would be true in supporting the government, as Robert Brook does in his day job. In this brief episode, over the din and bottle collection activities at Monkigras, I catch up with him on just that topic and how he tries to manage being a change agent for the benefit of the UK Parliament.

See the full show-notes.

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Show-notes and Links

For this episode, we also have a transcript thanks to Pivotal:

Coté:
How many times do you think we can get you to cackle?

Robert Brook:
No, I … You will. Definitely, you will. I’m so worried about this new machinery you’ve got set up.

Coté:
I know. I know. You know, I think we have a shared interest.

Robert Brook:
Yeah, we do.

Coté:
In the Roland R09, if I remember.

Robert Brook:
Yeah.

Coté:
Which is a lovely piece of equipment.

Robert Brook:
Mine is all dusty and broken. Yours is all new and shiny.

Coté:
This is a zoom H4N.

Robert Brook:
It’s amazing.

Coté:
I last used this equipment back when I was doing videos for Redmonk. What’s nice about it, it has XLR lens in.

Robert Brook:
Oh, right.

Coté:
Which, unless you’ve actually tried to do any AV stuff, means nothing to you.

Robert Brook:
Did you plug a mic in?

Coté:
Oh, yeah, I used to have two lav, three lav mics and a little mixer thing.

Robert Brook:
This is like the market for you.

Coté:
Sure.

Robert Brook:
Or that’s being in the toilet in London.

Coté:
We are sort of in a kitchenette area here in Monkigras. I think it’s quite exciting. Who are you? Let me pull a Scoville on you.

Robert Brook:
Who? Yeah, who am I? What does he ask?

Coté:
I think he says who are you, and what do you do, and tell me something cool in Google+.

Robert Brook:
Oh, god, I’m too old for any of this. I’m too old for anything. My name is Robert Brook.

Coté:
That’s right.

Robert Brook:
I work at UK Parliament. I’ve been working there for 14 years, which means I’m completely institutionalized.

Coté:
This is what I’m actually most excited about. I can finally figure out what you do exactly.

Robert Brook:
You think that’s going to happen.

Coté:
I’m going to pull a Coté Sr. on you. He’s always trying to figure out what I do, and I’m not sure if he knows quite yet.

Robert Brook:
My dad’s completely given up on that. He just thinks I’m the guy who fixes the Princes.

Coté:
Now, from what I can tell, you sort of pay attention to interesting, new, small technologies.

Robert Brook:
I do do that.

Coté:
Small in a beneficial way. And you think, “How might this be applied to the UK Parliament?”

Robert Brook:
No. Well yes I do do that, but I don’t get paid to do that by my employer. I just do that out of the kindness of my heart.

Coté:
You do get paid for this.

Robert Brook:
Yeah, I do get paid.

Coté:
This would be the Sunshine Bakery.

Robert Brook:
It’s a fascinating place to work, but I understand why it attracts certain sorts of people. I understand why it frustrates most people because a lot of people want it to be like a business, or a department, government department, and it just isn’t. It’s a really weird place to work.

Coté:
Yeah.

Robert Brook:
But I’m still there.

Coté:
Over the years you’ve come out with all sorts of interesting little projects, which may be one of your personal time things. Still I think they’re reflective of a “software could make this suck less.”

Robert Brook:
Totally. I think I, occasionally, I might think to myself, “Am I quoting Coté here?” I keep thinking I probably am. I keep thinking, I want to help reduce friction in the existing systems.

Coté:
Yeah.

Robert Brook:
Which is such a low bar.

Coté:
I know what you mean. We saw a talk from a Swedish reporter. She was going over some … I wouldn’t call them friction-reduction, but friction-coping techniques, like dealing with PDFs. She basically just wanted to get data into a spreadsheet to do analysis over, and it turns out that’s quite hard but she had astounding results, which is really nice.

Robert Brook:
Which is, in a very small way, what I’ve been doing recently as well. Which is, most of it is really grunt work, with stuff like open refine and getting CSV files in and out, that sort of stuff. It’s boring day to day,

Coté:
Give us some examples of that. What are some less frictionful. How have you been removing friction?

Robert Brook:
How have I been removing friction? A lot of my time now is talking to people and convincing them to do things and think about stuff and not worry. I used to. I never called myself a developer …

Coté:
You’ve become a hustler.

Robert Brook:
I’ve become the hustler.

Coté:
This is a very valid career track for technical people. Sometimes this is also known as being a CTO.

Robert Brook:
We have a new CTO come to join us.

Coté:
Oh, good.

Robert Brook:
We have a new regime. It’s called digital; apparently, we’re doing digital. I’m looking forward to seeing the results.

Coté:
When I was writing up my “why I’m working at pivotal-dot” post, I was realizing I’ve never really been comfortable with the idea of digital enterprise. Now I like it, because I’m always hunting for the opposite of something. Is that an adjective that you add to something? Like if you attach an adjective to it, it must imply there was a negative to it, otherwise, something. Otherwise Hemingway cries. It does seem like it’s a good foil to talk about; there’s an analog world, an analog business, because I think that really is the way to highlight how much interesting opportunity there is, code war.

Robert Brook:
This is hugely self-indulgent, which is why I’m not on the Internet anymore. I’m so self-obsessed that I just want to sit around and think, because there’s so much to think about. That gap between where we were 25 years ago and where we should be now, and why we aren’t there. Why haven’t things got better quicker? Why aren’t everybody …

Coté:
Right. Like, remember when podcasting was new?

Robert Brook:
Yeah.

Coté:
Jon Udell had a podcast, and he was like, “All I want to do is get my local library to have an iCal file.” I think he’s still working on that.

Robert Brook:
iCal is a good example because it worked for a while. Apple did that iCal exchange stuff.

Coté:
What was that company Yahoo! bought? Upcoming.org? Then obviously I guess because it was an organization, it didn’t make a profit, so that died out. Now you’ve got the Lanyard and things like that. It can be really hard just to get an iCal file.

Robert Brook:
Yeah, I’m disappointed. I’m disappointed generally. I always expect more, particularly at work. I’m notoriously curmudgeonly. I always want everything to be better faster, and the quite reasonable response to me has always been, “Well, Robert, what do you think we’re doing? This just takes a lot longer and is much more expensive than we think.”

Coté:
There’s like, you know, we only got democracy about what, a hundred years ago? Just slow down, man!

Robert Brook:
Exactly! What the hell is wrong with you people? Computers, what is this? The organization I work in, we don’t have the benefits or the disbenefits of working for a business.

Coté:
Right.

Robert Brook:
We don’t have the pressures that businesses are under. We have different pressures. Those pressures are usually weird pressures. Seeing our internal processes in terms of external actions is really, really strange.

Coté:
What’s an example of when you were doing your hustling, as you were saying about earlier? When you had to go talk to someone and convince them, like, “It would be a good idea if we had an iCal file”? What are the objections that they usually raise, and how do you soothe them?

Robert Brook:
Well, often, it’s simply, “I don’t understand what you just said.” That’s definitely my problem, at communicating why the hell people should do stuff at all. There’s this big argument about, well, loads of green screen stuff is going to stay on the green screen, and it’s never going to make it to your lovely little iPad or something like that. But, I mean, it should. We should expect more.

Coté:
Yeah.

Robert Brook:
I don’t think we expect enough. We seem to be satisfied with the shiny and the immediate, and we’re not satisfied with, particularly, our parents. It’s not enough, it’s just not enough.

Coté:
I think that’s true. When I was at the apex of my DevOps peddling at 451, that was sort of the more uplifting thing and I guess I still do when I talk about DevOps. Now we’ve arrived at, “the business should expect more.” Like I don’t really know what the business is. It does seem like that’s the next large challenge that we have. Like you know, we can all replicate how Netflix runs and does all that, but we need those business folks, or the enterprise people, to actually make demands of us.

Robert Brook:
We can scale servers, but we can’t scale people that give a shit.

Coté:
Well said.

Robert Brook:
That’s a big … There’s a kind of no man’s land between the tech people and the CEO people. That promise hasn’t been delivered. Not because there’s a technical gap; there clearly isn’t. Technology is great. Technology is great, and it’s going to get better.

Coté:
There’s like a business analyst gap. There needs to be a translator between these things. Bi-directionally.

Robert Brook:
Yeah. I’m completely aware, this is like a well-trodden path. We’ve been through this, and business analysis are supposed to in the BPM and all that sort of stuff. We’re supposed to solve this.

Coté:
Oh, BPM.

Robert Brook:
Yeah.

Coté:
I remember I read a great book on business process modeling. I must have been in my 20s because I read the whole book in detail, and at the end, I was like, “What the fuck did this just say?” As I grew older, I was like, oh! You’re, like, modeling out the processes of the business.

Robert Brook:
Yeah. We went so far as, remember the BPML?

Coté:
Yes!

Robert Brook:
It was like business process modeling language. It was like, “Who the hell thought of this?”

Coté:
Man, I wish I could find that book. It was quite the tome.

Robert Brook:
There’s a lot of gap there. It just feels like we haven’t got the grits for that. There are these two separate tracks. There was talk recently of having more tech people at kind of the senior board level. Then there was talk that you need a chief technology officer; you need a chief marketing officer; you need a chief copy officer. No, you just need to get it right.

Coté:
Yeah. It’s … I always wonder when you have all these CXOs, as it were. It’s almost like it’s not a misapplication. It’s an overapplication of the theory that one person should have ownership of something.

Robert Brook:
I totally think it’s actually unfair to put people in that position and to give them that supposed role and say, “Right, you’re going to help out.” You think, “Wait a minute, where could we actually put the lever in the organization for the most effect?” It’s going to be much, much lower down the grades. It’s going to be those people sitting.

Coté:
Bottoms up, if you will.

Robert Brook:
Oh, completely, yeah.

Coté:
One theory of hope, or one hopeful theory, depending on how you want to describe it, is you got the kids with their Facebook and their mobile phones.

Robert Brook:
iPads.

Coté:
These millennials. Do they call them that over here? Millennials.

Robert Brook:
Probably, yeah.

Coté:
Who knows. You’ve got these millennials, and they just know about computers. Maybe as they get into the workforce, they will be this bottoms-up tide rising. Do you see any hints of that happening?

Robert Brook:
Yeah, on the hardware usage side, there’s Federica Bottici talked about this recently, about the introduction to medium-size screens into organizations. Stephen Hackett was arguing he doesn’t see it anywhere, this isn’t a corporate thing and Federica was saying, “No, kids playing games on their iPad are going to be writing college papers on their iPad in a couple of years, and then they’re going to go the workforce”

Coté:
Yeah, man, they’ve got to figure out that moving your finger around to move your text, because that’s hard.

Robert Brook:
Well, once you come onto the software side of it, you think, “Well, okay, is iPad close to a general purpose computer? If so, what are we going to do? Are we going to have these kids coming in with just ipads and just documents?” I mean it’s not going to … We’re at the backend systems.

Coté:
Yeah, that’s a concrete thing to imagine out. Do some futurology. In the sort of problem domains or the friction areas you deal with, what would it mean to be iPad-first, or tablet-first? How do you imagine that would change things around? Like, I show up in a government office, and I’ve got an iPad, or whatever; I’ve got a tablet. Then the interloquer, the person I’m dealing with, the person who’s assisting me to realize my ambitions with the government also has a tablet, and then what? Am I beaming things back and forth?

Robert Brook:
Well, I’m going to be really crappy and say I don’t work for the government. But anyway …

Coté:
Let’s just imagine it.

Robert Brook:
Some people here do work for the government, the picker boys, a very impressive bunch of people. I think that the rather obvious thing is mobile first, so where people are consuming these services, you can imagine the services being extended out to obviously where the eyeballs are. The interaction is not yet …. Again, I just want to have people sit around and think about this.

Coté:
Yeah, like I went to go, I’ve gotten a lot of traction out of this DMV story. But I went to the DMV recently, and it sort of occurred to me, that why don’t I just take a picture of myself and be done? There’s all sorts of fraud and security and chain-of-trust nonsense, but there’s some basically fundamental things that it would be interesting …

Robert Brook:
There’s the equivalent over here is the DVLA, the vehicle licensing authority or something like that, and that’s exactly the changes they’re going through at the moment which are huge, absolutely huge.

Coté:
Yeah, that would be fun. It’s your point of it’s just slow change. Let’s just use the on-board camera, and that’s just what we’re going to do for the next few years.

Robert Brook:
Yeah.

Something Celsius and Busy Bullshit work – Lords of Computing Podcast #003

Summary

While he’s in Paris for the local DevOpsDays, John and I discuss the next big step for DevOps: getting “The Business” involved to tie-break the process deadlock. Plus: the Dutch are delightful!

Sponsor: The Cloud Foundry Summit is coming up on May 11th and 12th, in Santa Clara. It’s a great chance to dive into Cloud Foundry ecosystem both on the technology side and to hear how organizations are using Cloud Foundry to become Software Defined Businesses. Register now with the discount code COTE and get 25%, which will bring the price down from $250 to about $187.

Subscribe to the podcast: iTunes, RSS Feed

See the full show-notes.

Subscribe: iTunes, RSS Feed

Show-notes and Links

Ecosystems: how do they work? – Software Defined Talk #030

Summary

With a new round of funding in Docker, we discuss the ecosystem around Docker and how different vendors might be thinking through their involvement. This brings up a broader discussion of the ecosystems around OpenStack and Cloud Foundry, and even the Apache Software Foundation.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Come check out the Cloud Foundry Summit, May 11th and 12th. You’ll hear how companies are using Cloud Foundry to create software defined businesses and get the latest technical details on Cloud Foundry. Register with the code COTE to get 25% off!

Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes, RSS Feed

Show notes

Docker Funding…

  • $95M “Currently, Docker is investing heavily in its go-to-market strategy, but also in the technology stack where it plans to expand the platform’s capabilities with a focus on networking, security and storage tools around its service.”
  • thenewstack.io coverage, goin’ for the gold: “‘For us to become a public company — which is certainly our intention,” Golub told The New Stack’s Alex Williams, ‘we’ve got a long road ahead of us that includes not only continued growth in open source, and developing a healthy ecosystem around it, but also proving there’s a solid revenue model. All the signs are very, very good, all the momentum is there, and the next several years are going to be about solid execution, both on the community and on the commercial side.'”
  • 120 employees
  • “Last year Docker earned less than $10 million in revenue, Golub confirmed.”
  • And as always, The Future of Everything.
  • Coté to explain the uneasy feel everyone (read: vendors!) has about Docker: it seems like they’re winner takes all.
  • Twitter turns off the Firehose (Matt) – Be careful building your company on someone else’s good graces
  • Speaking of crazy-ass valuations, Ben Thompson’s 1999 – How the IPO landscape has changed, specifically related to Growth Capital.

More Ecosystem Talk

BONUS: Shameless Self Promotion:

Recommendations

Becoming a tech reporter, talking with Alex Williams – Lords of Computing Podcast 002

Summary

How do you go from playing baseball in France, to getting shot at, to covering the tech industry? I talk with Alex Williams about how he did just that and eventually launched thenewstack.io, one of the more interesting, new technology news sites.

Dell World Social Think Tank - Enabling Innovation in IT.

Sponsor: The Cloud Foundry Summit is coming up on May 11th and 12th, in Santa Clara. It’s a great chance to dive into Cloud Foundry ecosystem both on the technology side and to hear how organizations are using Cloud Foundry to become Software Defined Businesses. Register now with the discount code COTE and get 25%, which will bring the price down from $250 to about $187.

Subscribe: iTunes, RSS Feed

It’s a hipster thing, don’t worry about it – Software Defined Talk #029

Summary

Is there Buc-ee’s bubble? Fighting a bad network connection, we discuss cloud-native vs. cloud-immigrant applications and the platforms that support them. We also briefly touch on AWS and HP seeming to exit the public cloud.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Come check out the Cloud Foundry Summit, a great chance to not only learn about the cloud platform but also hear about how people are using it. It’s May 11th and 12th in Santa Clara. Use the discount code COTE to get 25% of registration.

Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes, RSS Feed

Show notes

  • No video this week.

Wither “datacenter operating systems”

HP public cloud re-positioning

Microsoft’s Nano Server and Hyper-V Containers (Matt)

  • Nano servers
  • New containers

  • Some analysis by Tim Anderson.

  • TPM on the Windows Server foot-print: “With Microsoft trying to get an installed base of more than 8 million Windows Server 2003 machines upgraded before the middle of summer, when tech support ends, this year was not a good time to muddle the market message with a new server version of Windows.” But does this apply to “legacy” workloads, or is it the same “only cloud native apps need apply story” as for most container platforms?

AWS Announcements

Bonus links we missed this week

Weekly OpenStack Check-in

  • OpenStack losing luster?

  • “The worst thing for OpenStack right now is Red Hat,” McKenty says.

  • As I’ve said before and I’ll say it again, with the entire software industry working on 1 project (minus Amazon and Google), how could politics and in-fighting possibly derail it?
  • Oh wait, OpenStack’s fine but boring
  • “OpenStack, ultimately, is a feature not a product. And that’s not a bad thing.”

New Sputniks are out

Wunderkammer

Recommendations

How to demo your cloud poop, don’t smoke corn silk, and other advice for people who lived in the 1930s – Lords of Computing Podcast 001

Summary

What does it take to demo a cloud software? It’s not easy! Also, lamb considered and memories of barcampESM. Our first re-boot of the IT Management and Cloud Podcast, renamed the Lords of Computing Podcast.

Your friends, @cote and @botchagalupe.

See the full show-notes.

Subscribe: http://feeds.feedburner.com/LordsOfComputing

Show-notes and Links

Shift key avoidance syndrome, and running clouds

What’re the needs and concerns for running a cloud platform? Also, why do some people refuse to use the shift key? Those hot topics are explored in-depth in the most recent Pivotal Conversations podcast with Andrew and I. Check out the detailed show notes over there, download the episode directly, or listen with the player above!

Also, you should subscribe to the podcast feed, then you’ll just get episodes downloaded automatically.

Do not be fooled by the allure of the CostCo Levi’s – Software Defined Talk #28

Summary

This week we talk about Chef’s new continuous delivery product, Chromebooks, the demise of Nebula in OpenStack land, Red Hat’s recent performance, getting used to 2Fa, and the usual round of recommendations.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR:
Want to try out Pivotal’s public PaaS? Try out Pivotal Web Services for two months free. For other fun Pivotal stuff, check out https://cote.io/pivotal.

Sign up for my newsletter at https://cote.io/memo.

Subscribe to this podcast: http://feeds.feedburner.com/SoftwareDefinedTalk

Show notes

Follow-up/Corrections from last week:

Bonus links not covered this week

Recommendations

Santa Claus delivering cloudy dim sum, James Watters on multi-cloud support and Pivotal Cloud Foundry 1.4

My second Pivotal podcast is up, continuing in the conversations is me talking with another Pivotal person, James Watters who heads up the platform group at Pivotal. We talk about the current 1.4 release of Pivotal Cloud Foundry, multi-cloud support, and what customers have been up to. There’s a bit of competative poking at the end as well. And a full transcript!

I have any more episodes in the queue to publish and am doing more with Andrew (people really liked the first one), so go ahead and subscribe to just get them automatically! ;)

Enterprise Golf, or, you get what you pay for, Software Defined Talk #27

Summary

Do you really need to play golf to make enterprise software sales? We explore that and other topics like FoundationDB shutting off it’s GitHub taps, GigaOm suddently shutting down, and tipcs on how to become a software company.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Pivotal has is releasing a new version of Pivotal Cloud Foundry and you can now run your platform in AWS. Also, check out why we like to say “platform” instead of “PaaS.” See details at https://cote.io/pivotal

SPONSOR: ChefCon, from Matt: Come check out ChefConf! March 31st to April 2nd. DevOps, configuration management, and the little dog. Get a nice discount with when you register with the code BETTERTOGETHER.

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Show notes

BONUS LINKS! Not covered in show

We collect up links to talk about during the week but rarely get to all of them. Here’s the ones we neglected.

Recommendations

Mo’ money, mo’ problems revisited – Software Defined Talk #26

Summary

In this episode, we discuss putting together a good, helpful cloud strategy, for large companies. Also, some Twilio talk and the woes of enterprise cloud.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Come hear about Pivotal Cloud Foundry at one of our roadshows, Coté will be at many of them: https://cote.io/pivotal – Cincinnati, Columbus, RDU, Charlotte. and more!

SPONSOR: Come check out ChefConf! March 31st to April 2nd. DevOps, configuration management, and the little dog. Get a nice discount with when you register with the code BETTERTOGETHER.

Sign up for my newsletter at coteindustries.com/memo.

Subscribe to this podcast: http://feeds.feedburner.com/SoftwareDefinedTalk

Show notes

Recommendations

025: Burn the boats because we’re inventing self-driving cars

Summary

We discuss the 100,000 node OpenStack cluster at Wal-mart, the new new Microsoft, the rumored Apple Car, and the industry analyst market being disrupted. It’s not too shabby this week.

Full show-notes can be found at https://cote.io/sdt/25.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSORS:

  • Come learn all about Pivotal Cloud Foundry for free, get hands on, and even see Coté if that’s your thing. We’ll be in Austin, Houston, Cincinnati, Columbus, RDU, Charlotte and more in the March.

  • ChefCon is coming up, March 31st to April 2nd. in the new, bigger venue. The little dog will be there! For 10% off, use the code SDT when you register.

  • Amp up your skills and get to the top at this Whole Product Workshop March 7-8 NYC. Go to http://craftsmanpm.com/ and grab a spot at 10% off for just SDN listeners (use code: cotesdn) before it’s all gone.

Sign up for my newsletter at coteindustries.com/memo.

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Show notes

Recommendations