Spring Survey 2020 – Highlights

Survey highlights:

  • Download the report after some light leadgen.
  • “The research effort included a total of 1,024 individuals, all of whom have a role that involves daily use of Spring.”
  • 77% of the respondents have been using Spring Boot for 3 years or more. So, these are people very familiar with Spring and Java.
  • Industries: technology companies (30%) and financial services companies (20%). All major sectors are represented, including retail (8%), services (6%), and healthcare (5%).
  • 37% work at organizations of 5,000 to 10,000+ staff. Of that, 28% from 10,000+ orgs.
  • So, a bit heavy on tech companies, but good enough on both industries and diverse spread of organization size.
  • “52% of developers surveyed use Spring boot as their only or primary development platform.”
  • No slow-down in use: “75% of respondents expect Spring Boot usage to grow over the next 2 years.”
  • Uses, lots of API use, interesting: 
Types of Spring Boot apps.
  • Lots of public cloud only use: “When asked where they deploy their Spring Boot apps, 57% of respondents were either deploying exclusively to public cloud (21%) or in a hybrid mode with both on-prem/private and public cloud deployments.” 
  • – Most running in containers – 65% containerize their apps, 30% planning to.
  • …to run in kubernetes: 44% already running in kubernetes, 31% plan to in the next 12 months.
  • [This should make us ask the question: how does Spring Boot support kubernetes? Cf. Spring docs entry, another write-up.]
  • So, what do people use in Spring. If APIs are one of the top problems to solve with Spring, it is as you’d expect:
    • 83% are using a microservices “development style.”
    • 56% use Spring Cloud.
    • 34% Spring Cloud Gateway (77% interested – big spread).
    • 22% using Spring Cloud Data Flow (big spread again with 69% interested).
  • See also Dormain’s coverage.

If you’re interested in more, we’ll be talking about this next week, September 21st at 5pm Amsterdam time over on Tanzu TV.

Overview of VMware’s kubernetes distros/packagings, and integration with vSphere

“The customers will be able to get completely integrated Kubernetes, the same value proposition. IT administrators can deploy this drop-in Kubernetes infrastructure right into their environment. Most enterprises have vSphere today. You can drop it right in and you can administer Kubernetes from the same platform, the tools and even the same skill sets that they already have. But the developer or the application owner can consume the infrastructure the way they’re used to doing it, the way they want to do it, through the Kubernetes interface, [which] is an API. With vSphere with Tanzu, customers can bring their own networking, they can bring their own storage. That’s a key difference from VMware Cloud Foundation with Tanzu. vSphere with Tanzu will really, really open up the floodgates for application modernization initiatives and the simple reason for that is it’s by far the leading hypervisor.”

Also, screenshots of lots of the marketectures and such.

Original source: VMware Bets On Enterprises Wanting Kubernetes And Virtualization Mashup

iPad growth over its ten years, analyzing the difference between the iPad and iPhone

As a result, iPads stay in use longer, get passed on to new users and serve for many years. Their average life span is likely well over 4 years and 9 year old iPads are not uncommon. It’s therefore very likely that the vast majority of all iPads sold are still in use.

So the true measure of success is not units sold but number of active (and satisfied) users. The iPad user base is probably around 400 million (about 27% of total active Apple devices.) The degree of activity is also telling and is reflected in the million apps built specifically for the platform.

And, taking over the traditional PC space is a big task:

It has not done that so far, much to the delight of naysayers. But this is not as big a failure as it might seem.

First note that the Mac user base itself is not nearly as big (110 million +/-10%). iPad could be 4x bigger in user base. The Windows base is larger at 1.2 to 1.4 billion but that resists frontal assault as it is deeply entrenched around enterprise workflows. It’s also bereft of profit.

Original source: [The iPad at 10](http://www.asymco.com/2020/09/16/the-ipad-at-10/)

20 years of mainframe Linux

By the spring of 1999. Frye recalls, "Enterprise Systems Group General Manager William Zeitler had enough information for a final chart of his presentation to then-CEO Lou Gerstner: ‘We also have Linux on s/390,’ Zeitler said." Gerstner was not impressed at first. In fact, "’That’s the stupidest idea I’ve ever heard,’ said Gerstner, who then paused for reflection and added ‘Or maybe not?’"

Original source: 20 years of Linux on Big Iron

The missing context from that new Woodward book

In their self-hagiographys, people involved in the Trump presidency suddenly become astonished by the incompetency of the adminstration.

And then, Woodward’s conclusion:

But now, I’ve come to the conclusion that the ‘dynamite behind the door’ was in plain sight. It was Trump himself. The oversized personality. The failure to organize. The lack of discipline. The lack of trust in others he had picked, in experts. The undermining or attempted undermining of so many American institutions. The failure to be a calming, healing voice. The unwillingness to acknowledge error. The failure to do his homework. To extend the olive branch. To listen carefully to others. To craft a plan.

Also, the review writer:

Most of this Administration’s greatest disasters have been policy-related—but policy of this sort was inevitable with a person like Trump. What his racism did not infect, his corruption most certainly did; we are left with nothing except Trump himself and the political party that was broken enough to nominate such a man.

Such a weird time in American civics.

Original source: Bob Woodward’s Bad Characters

New VMware kubernetes distro packages

The new kubernetes distro packages/products from @VmwareTanzu. There’s four bundles of the distro, associated management tools, and integrated developer stuff.

Also:

the vSphere-Tanzu combo does not need to run the complete stack. “They can bring their own networking, they can bring their own storage,” D’Paiva explained, adding that it should also accelerate modern workload transformations because it ties directly into the vSphere platform that many enterprises are already running today.

“With this drop-in infrastructure it takes about an hour for an existing IT administrator to simply get started with Kubernetes and go,” D’Paiva said.

Original source: Simplify Your Approach to Application Modernization with 4 Simple Editions for the Tanzu Portfolio

Multi-cloud as dragging workloads across clouds hampered by data gravity

Organisations should not make portability a primary driver for adopting Kubernetes, Meinardi explains, as the likelihood that an application, once deployed, will move to a new infrastructure provider is actually very low.

This is simply because databases and data lakes are expensive to move, weighing down applications. The truth is that most organisations don’t think moving this data is worth the hassle so end up sticking with the same provider.

Gartner analysts question Kubernetes portability credentials

Relearning to change, improve

This is the process of relearning, which comes with its own challenges: (1) you must be willing to adapt and be open to information that goes against your inherent beliefs (2) you may need to to learn how to learn again and (3) you must create an environment for relearning to happen in a meaningful, yet often challenging, space outside your existing comfort zone. The point of relearning is that you’re trying to get better information and learn to see, sense, and listen differently, to respond and act differently.

Original source: Book Review: Unlearn by Barry O’Reilly

Move from the Bay Area, get paid less

But employees who worked at VMware’s Palo Alto, California, headquarters and go to Denver, for example, must accept an 18% salary reduction, people familiar with the matter said. Leaving Silicon Valley for Los Angeles or San Diego means relinquishing 8% of their annual pay, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing internal policies.

Original source: VMware Cuts Pay for Remote Workers Fleeing Silicon Valley

Air France KLM modernizes their payments service, SpringOne 2020 talk – Notebook

Air France KLM modernized their payments service recently, EPASS. This is a 12 year old system that provides the backend for processing purchasing airline tickets (and other things, I guess) from numerous front-ends: the web, mobile app, and social apps as well. The system was difficult to scale, it required manually adding new servers and had a long development cycle. As more and more people want to interact with Air France KLM through software (phones, online, in WhatsApp, or whatever other “channel”), they want to be able to evolve their software quickly. They want to use software as a core innovation tool for improving customer experience and, thus, business. So, here we see one of their first experiences modernizing their backend and transforming how they do software.

Talk presented by Oya Ünlü Duygulu and Patrick Zijlstra.

Highlights

-Rick in intro: transformed payments platform in 6 weeks.

– [Corporate vision] is to provide good, “our purpose as an airline group is create memorable experiences for our passengers. 

– So, they want to (1.) focus on customer centricity, (2.) innovation, and, (3.) efficiencies in our processes.

– “Digital” as the primary channel is on the rise. People want to interact through apps and such. So, KLM needs to meet the customers there… “As an airline, we want to be where our passengers are” (~3:00)

– Some examples of digital features: “‘About 10 percent of the ideas actually end up on the market. A recent example of this is the hand baggage check in the KLM app. Through augmented reality travelers can see whether their hand luggage meets the set dimensions. This function went live last month. ‘ Six months ago, a 3D rendering of the business class seats was also shown when checking in online. ‘This with the idea of ​​stimulating the sale of these chairs.”

– For example, listening and interacting with customers in social media [something I’ve done many times – it’s great to chat with someone (or a bot?) in WhatsApps, Twitter, etc. instead of a phone call]. (~3:40) Social media is now “our closest connection to passengers.” And in China: “For instance, Chinese travelers rely immensely on mobile devices. How can these personal devices be used for authentication – identity management, payment etc. to streamline the journey wherever possible? In China, the whole landscape is different, and we need to ensure we aren’t relying overtly on drawing customers only to our touch-points.” 

– (~3:10) merged together KLM and Air France backends to get less complexity in the back-end and a unified experience in the front-end for customers. Social media is now “our closest connection to passengers.”

– 350 agile teams. Using Scrun, Kanban. SAFe. See SAFe case study from ~2018, and some trip notes from someone at ACM Agile.

– The use SAFe release trains (which they call “release planes”), mapped to customer value journeys, e.g., sales, paid products, or airport.

– In the digital department, they have about than 50 product teams.

– Planning every three months, come together get a roadmap from the business, and all the teams plan together. Then they start sprinting bi-weekly.

– Also shared services and practices team.

– Their /goals: 

– (~5:50) “We are designing our products focused on time to market, innovation, robustness, and security.”

– Focusing on getting CI/CD in place.

– Also, reducing complexity and speeding up business value [realization], so we are moving towards a microservices architecture.

– [Business stuff:] EPASS handles payments from many places, created 12 years ago. Wanted to modernize [not sure why]. They worked with Pivotal Labs on modernization for a six wee project.

– EPASS app – made 12 years ago, handles about 37,000 payments transactions per day. Takes care of all online revenue.

– Six week engagement with Pivotal Labs. This brought expertiese from the outside, combined with their existing skills.

– “Six weeks is very ambitious for such a project, but getting this expertise from Pivotal and their dedication we made a success story at the end.”

– Modernization road-map for EPASS.

– We want to speed up with release cycles, which was then one month. [Move to single piece work-flow: whenever a user story is ready, then it can go live.] 

– In six weeks, all the could focus on was transforming the app and moving it to the new platform [PCF]. But, they could also modernize their skills by adding in TDD and pair programming.

– Switches to Patrick.

– (~10:55) – they go over their way of working. 

– Inception to set expectations. Outception to look back at what was achieved. Some blocker removal meetings. And the usual agile meetings.

– Two teams: one does modernization, the other delivers business features.

– Worked in one week iterations.

– Doing pair programming. “We noticed that this really increases the code quality that we deliver.”

– (~12:30) EPASS architecture. Was hosted on bare-metal Tomcat server. To scale, had to add new server and put EPASS software on it. This was becoming a hassle and fixing that was a motivation to move to VMware Tanzu.

– (~14:00) new architecture – five different components. Three in Tanzu Application Service.

– After, the majority of things were put in VMware Tanzu…

– [Picked some small things at first to test stuff out, hardcoded secrets but later fixed that – used CredHub – in long term will move to Vault.]

– (~16:00) Used Spring Boot, adding health check [this is good to highlight, that it gets instrumented/observable “for free”].

– “It was invigorating working to work with the  Pivotal experts and now there’s more confidence in the team to continue.”

– Used Bamboo, added in automation stuff for deployment…

– Problems: networking problems

– Benefits: response times improved by 10%; “all the power for scaling is within the product team itself” instead of having to work with other groups, file tickets, etc. Also, time to patch is within 72 hours (3 days).

– (~21:08) “The experience was very positive. It was invigorating to work with the Pivotal experts. And, now there’s more confidence within the team to continue to improve the application.”

– The projects have been finished for a few months. No more components in bare-metal Tomcat.

– “From the organization side, there is no more fear of big changes. If such an old application as EPASS can transform, then it’s possible for any application.”

– “So more and more and more applications will be moving to TAS [Tanzu Application Service].”

Little boxes

McLuckie has explained that with containerised applications running on an Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) model, code could be written in a hermetically-sealed unit, from which it could be deployed, whole, into disparate environments — a test cloud and a production cloud, for instance.

So far, this standardization of packaging and app architecture looks like one of the most useful effects of kubernetes. Using kubernetes comes with an implicit architecture model, a way of instrumenting applications (making them observable and manageable in production), and a defined life-cycle. It’s not perfectly clear-cut, but there are enough constraints in how you package up, deploy, and run apps in kubernetes that you don’t have many options.

This gives you an architecture you can just accept and start using: you don’t need to spend months – years, often – debating an enterprise architecture in your organization, coming up with many competing stacks, and then 3 or 4 years later sort of deciding on one but having to live with all that variation (e.g., the state we’re currently in).

Less grandiose, it means less architectural position papers you have to write, less meetings to go to, less arguments with rival ideas, and less time spent building and enforcing the policy of your enterprise architecture. Instead, you can spend all that time making the application better, and, thus, the business better. No CEO ever cared which kubernetes distro you ran, how much you paid to build or licenses it, or if it’s multi-cloud. They care if it helped them make money.

The same applies to ops: there’s now one way (sort of) to understand and manage it all. In contrast, we current have many different ways and tools, often customized within large organizations. That much variety ends up costing too much, and slowing things down more than you’d think.

Original source: VMware VP: Kubernetes as the ‘new IaaS normal’