Published on [Permalink]
Reading time: 7 minutes
Posted in:

DevOps is Dead, and, People Who Write "DevOps Is Dead" are Wrong (as written by OpenAI ChatGPT)

Here is the prompt I used:

Could you write an 800 word article on the idea that “DevOps is Dead”? There have been so many advancements in technologies and practices since DevOps was invented, like platform engineering that has evolved into something different. DevOps also got way distracted by the “culture” aspects of operations work. Also, I’m not sure it really ever brought application developers into the fold. My other theory is that the infatuation with kubernetes over the past five years wore away at some of the advances made by DevOps automation: now we’re starting over again with the need to build developer-friendly platforms on-top of kubernetes. There’s that famous Tweet from Kelsey Hightower that kubernetes is a platform for building platforms. Why didn’t the DevOps community catch this reversion? Instead, we’re starting over again. DevOps was great for it’s time, but it somehow lost the plot and we should welcome the new generation of people solving the problem of infrastructure automation and developer productivity.

And here is what the AI wrote:

In recent years, there has been a growing sentiment that "DevOps is dead." This idea is fueled by a number of factors, including the rapid evolution of technologies and practices in the field, the focus on "culture" rather than technical advancements, and the rise of platform engineering.

DevOps, which originated in the early 2010s, was a response to the increasing complexity of IT operations and the need for better collaboration between developers and operations teams. Its goal was to automate and streamline the software delivery process, enabling organizations to deliver high-quality, reliable software faster and more efficiently.

However, as the field of DevOps has matured, it has become clear that many of its initial goals have not been fully realized. One of the biggest criticisms of DevOps is that it failed to fully integrate application developers into the software delivery process. Many developers still feel that they are on the outside looking in when it comes to DevOps, and that they have little influence over the way that their software is delivered.

Another criticism of DevOps is that it got distracted by the “culture” aspects of operations work. While it is important for organizations to foster a culture of collaboration and continuous improvement, many believe that the focus on culture has come at the expense of technical progress. As a result, some argue that DevOps has stagnated, and that it is no longer capable of delivering the kind of innovation and progress that is needed to keep pace with the rapid changes in the technology industry.

One of the key drivers of this shift away from DevOps has been the rise of platform engineering. Unlike DevOps, which focuses on the automation and optimization of the software delivery process, platform engineering is focused on building and managing the underlying infrastructure that powers modern applications. This includes technologies such as containers, microservices, and cloud-native platforms like Kubernetes.

Over the past few years, there has been a growing trend towards using these platform-based technologies to build and deploy applications. This has led many to argue that DevOps, with its emphasis on traditional tools and practices, is no longer relevant. Instead, they argue that the future of infrastructure automation and developer productivity lies with platform engineering and the use of modern, cloud-native technologies.

Despite these criticisms, however, it is important to recognize that DevOps has made significant contributions to the field of IT operations. Its focus on collaboration and automation has helped to drive innovation and improve the efficiency of the software delivery process. Furthermore, many of the principles and practices that are at the heart of DevOps, such as continuous delivery and infrastructure as code, are still highly relevant and valuable in today’s technology landscape.

In the end, it is clear that the field of DevOps has evolved significantly since its inception. While some of its initial goals and principles may no longer be relevant, its focus on collaboration and automation remains vital to the success of modern organizations. As such, while it may no longer be the dominant force in the field of IT operations, DevOps is far from dead. Instead, it continues to evolve and adapt to the changing needs of the industry.

I’d go in and change some things - kind of tone it down to be less cocksure - but, pretty good if you really wanted to go hard and fill a The New Stack paid column or a thought piece somewhere else.

But, what if you think the above is wrong? Well, you could then tell the AI the following:

That was pretty good. Now, can you write a piece that argues that this “DevOps is Dead” idea is wrong and, in fact, rude to the people who put in the work to define DevOps? As the DORA reports have proven, the practices of DevOps have paid off. It’s fine to use a new phrase - “platform engineering” - for the continued evolution of DevOps, but it’s a cheap shot to use a click-bait headline like “DevOps is dead.”

The idea that "DevOps is dead" is not only wrong, but it is also a disservice to the people who have worked hard to define and advance the field of DevOps. Despite the rapid evolution of technologies and practices in the field, DevOps continues to be a vital and relevant approach to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of IT operations.

One of the key arguments against the notion that DevOps is dead is the fact that its practices and principles have been proven to be highly effective. Numerous studies, including the annual DevOps Report by DORA, have shown that organizations that embrace DevOps are able to deliver software faster, with higher quality and reliability. These organizations are also able to improve their overall efficiency and productivity, enabling them to outpace their competitors and achieve greater success.

Furthermore, the rise of platform engineering should not be seen as a rejection of DevOps, but rather as a natural evolution of the field. As technologies and practices have evolved, so too has DevOps. Many of the key principles and practices that are at the heart of DevOps, such as continuous delivery and infrastructure as code, are still highly relevant and valuable in today’s technology landscape. Rather than being replaced by platform engineering, DevOps is evolving and adapting to the changing needs of the industry.

Another key argument against the idea that DevOps is dead is that it is a disservice to the people who have worked hard to define and advance the field. Over the past decade, DevOps has grown from a small, niche movement into a widely-recognized and respected approach to IT operations. This would not have been possible without the hard work and dedication of the individuals and organizations who have been involved in the DevOps community. To suggest that DevOps is dead is to undermine the efforts of these individuals and organizations and to erase their contributions to the field.

In conclusion, the notion that “DevOps is dead” is not only wrong, but it is also a disservice to the people who have worked hard to define and advance the field. Despite the rapid evolution of technologies and practices in the field, DevOps continues to be a vital and relevant approach to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of IT operations. Rather than being replaced by platform engineering, DevOps is evolving and adapting to the changing needs of the industry.

There’s some middle-school phrases you’d want to edit out, like “Another key argument…” and maybe add some slicker structuring. And there’s some repition, like the word “disservice,” that you’d need to polish out. But, again: about like 70% of a start for this kind of thought piece.

And then we could ask it to write it in the style of Strong Bad:

Yo dudes and dudettes, it's Strong Bad here to tell you that this "DevOps is dead" idea is a bunch of crap. Here's why:
  1. The practices of DevOps have been proven to work. Studies show that organizations that embrace DevOps are able to deliver software faster, with higher quality and reliability.
  2. The rise of platform engineering is not a rejection of DevOps, it’s a natural evolution of the field. As technologies and practices have evolved, so too has DevOps.
  3. It’s rude to the people who have worked hard to define and advance DevOps. To suggest that DevOps is dead is to undermine their efforts and to erase their contributions to the field.

So yeah, don’t believe the hype. DevOps is not dead, it’s alive and kicking. Now if you’ll excuse me, I gotta go eat some Bologna and listen to some 8-bit music. Later dudes!

Not very good in the middle, there.

@cote@hachyderm.io, @cote@cote.io, @cote