Make your conference talk about one small thing

The content at most conferences is midling. Most talks should be focused on one small thing, not an overview of everything (with the rare exception of an opening, level-setting talk, perhaps). Tech people fall prey to laundry listing a bunch of things because we get excited to learn new stuff, we love tools and new things and concepts – and usually we want to share that excitement, or at least show off and have the joy of hearing yourself talk (an under rated joy). But, listing everything you can think of on a given topic is usually a bad approach for a talk. A series of lectures is where to be comphrensive, or a book.

Sometimes, a laundry list of tactics is good, a table of contents for further work. A live demo is another thing too: you usually want to see the full-cycle of how an idea gets coded into an application, deployed, debugged, etc.

A story can be good if it’s a case study, but even then you probably want to conclude with one thing: “what we found was that we should have involved procurement at the beginning.”

Memorable talks usually have one idea, though.

A talk should be mostly the conclusion for a those laundry lists, those lecture series: here’s the one thing we found after all that work we described in chapters one to fifteen, or, the one idea we had, the one problem we solved that we didn’t even know we had, the idea you are (too) comfortable with that you need to change to stop suffering/unlock your potential, the one action I want you to take.

As with all people who give advice, I don’t follow it.