🗂 Link: High on low-code

Part of the reason for the rise is that buyers are reaching for larger targets. Kony projects its topline will grow to $120m in 2020. Quickbase, Nintex and Mendix were all nearing or above $100m in their recent sales.

Source: High on low-code

🗂 Link: What Cloud Vendors Really Want From Their Customers

How much a customer spends on an annual basis is absolutely an indicator of strength, both internally and to the market. It is also a clear indicator of being able to effectively execute to the often-publicized overarching objective of expanding the customer base’s portfolios of products over the course of the relationship and since inception. Cloud vendors and the analysts that cover them also know that as the annual spend rises, the baseline spend grows, which can be hit with an increase at renewal.

Source: What Cloud Vendors Really Want From Their Customers

🗂 Link: With Heptio and Pivotal, VMware Doubles Down on Kubernetes

The company introduced VMware Tanzu, a marketing name for a portfolio of products and services, existing and new, that will help enterprises build modern applications, run Kubernetes with consistency across environments, and manage all their Kubernetes clusters from a single control point. It will encompass aspects of its recent purchase of Bitnami, a library of packaged installers for web applications and development stacks, and the planned acquisition of Pivotal, which offers application development tools, data management products, and analytics intelligence platforms.

Also, from Gartner analyst Paul Delory:

“Kubernetes is too complex for the average IT shop to build and operate effectively. We’ve known this for a while,” he said. “Because of this, the public cloud providers have all created their own managed K8S offerings. But these are cloud-specific, and not interoperable.

“So now IT shops have silos of K8S infrastructure living in different clouds. Someone has to be the one who can manage all this infrastructure, across clouds, and make it work together. VMware says they’re the one to do it. I am cautiously optimistic.”

Source: With Heptio and Pivotal, VMware Doubles Down on Kubernetes

🗂 Link: VMware plan elevates Kubernetes to star enterprise status

A swag at how many new apps will be created to run on kubernetes cloud stuff. I assume this is actually existing, modernized apps and net-new ones despite the wording:

VMware says that from 2018 to 2023 – with new tools/platforms, more developers, agile methods, and lots of code reuse – 500 million new logical apps will be created serving the needs of many application types and spanning all types of environments.

Source: VMware plan elevates Kubernetes to star enterprise status

🗂 Link: VMware is bringing VMs and containers together, taking advantage of Heptio acquisition

“Kubernetes is a way of bringing a control metaphor to modern IT processes. You provide an expression of what you want to have happen, and then Kubernetes takes that and interprets it and drives the world into that desired state,” McLuckie explained.

More from another article:

The Tanzu portfolio also includes Project Galleon, which harnesses the packaging technology of VMware’s recent acquisition of Bitnami, to provide developers with an easy way to assemble software stacks. It will include a Platform as a Service development platform on its pending purchase of Pivotal. It also includes VMware Tanzu Mission Control, which will provide administrators with an overview of all Kubernetes clusters.

Source: VMware is bringing VMs and containers together, taking advantage of Heptio acquisition

Notes on the 2019 DevOps Report

Some quick notes and callouts from this year’s 2019 DevOps Report:

  • Four key metrics: lead time, deployment frequency, mean time to restore (MTTR) and change fail percentage.
    • Med, High, and Elite all have a change fail rate of 0-15%. So, expect 15% change fail as benchmark worst case to shoot for…?
  • Demographics: 30% are devs, 26% “DevOps or SRE” – [so, lots of ICs self-evaluating]. 16% “managers,” and then it goes down from there…
  • Top industries are Technology at 38% and FinServe at 12%. Retail is 9%.
  • Mostly North American (50%)and Europe (29%)
  • Org. size: 100-499 (21%), 500-1,999 (15%), and 10,000+ (26%)
  • “A key goal in digital transformation is optimizing software delivery performance: leveraging technology to deliver value to customers and stakeholders.”
  • [I’m not sure if age of company, and, thus, an indication of governance and tech debt, is tracked. With 38% being tech companies, it’d be good know how young they are. But, most FinServ companies are large and old (unless it was mostly FinServ startups!).
  • Very prescriptive this year, a maturity model to put a strategy in place, etc.
  • A lot on paying down tech debt:
    • Bounded contexts, APIs, SOA and microservices. Using and testing out of team services without having to work with that team (sort of like mocking for runtime).
    • Also: “Teams that manage code maintainability well have systems and tools that make it easy for developers to change code maintained by other teams, find examples in the codebase, reuse other people’s code, as well as add, upgrade, and migrate to new versions of dependencies without breaking their code”
  • Very little prod chaos monkey stuff: less than 10% across the board.
  • CABs still bad: those that have them are 2.6x more likely to be low performers.
    • Instead, do peer reviews and automate governance: “peer review-based approval during the development process. In addition to peer review, automation can be leveraged to detect, prevent, and correct bad changes much earlier in the delivery lifecycle. Techniques such as continuous testing, continuous integration, and comprehensive monitoring and observability provide early and automated detection, visibility, and fast feedback. In this way, errors can be corrected sooner than would be possible if waiting for a formal review.”
    • CABs should instead focus on process and practices change: ” the CAB should focus instead on helping teams with process- improvement work to increase the performance of software delivery. This can take the form of helping teams implement the capabilities that drive performance by providing guidance and resources. CABs can also weigh in on important business decisions that require a trade-off and sign-off at higher levels of the business, such as the decision between time-to- market and business risk.”
    • [I’m pretty sure that was the original point, esp. when you look at RUP and ITIL stuff: setting the process to be used. Tooling to automate governance wasn’t really available. Policing it those prescriptive processes took over as it always does. And I’m not sure there are industry standard frameworks to use there yet either. There must be lots of hand-crafting.]
    • “Survey respondents with a clear change process were 1.8 times more likely to be in elite performers.” – [as ever, garbage in, garbage out.]
    • The people who work on governance are not the ones who can actually do the coding to automate it: “only our technical practitioners have the power to build and automate the change management solutions we design, making them fast, reliable, repeatable, and auditable…. Leaders at every level should move away from a formal approval process where external boards act as gatekeepers approving changes, and instead move to a governance and capability development role. After all, only managers have the power to influence and change certain levels of organizational policy. We have seen exponential improvements in performance— throughput, stability, and availability—in just months as a result of technical practitioners and organizational leaders working together.”
  • This is a different measure of “productivity”: “Productivity is the ability to get complex, time-consuming tasks completed with minimal distractions and interruptions.”
    • It doesn’t track amount of work done, but the environment people are working in…?
  • Tools use is all across the board: DIY stuff, COTs, open source, etc. [This sort of excludes the IaaS and other runtime layers, focusing on just CI/CD and test automation]
  • “Multi-tasking” across roles and projects might be OK: “we cannot conclude that how well teams develop and deliver software affects the number of roles and projects that respondents juggle.”
  • Being able to find things and ask questions [and, presumably, getting answers!], having search, is important.
  • From my read (slide 74), the methods of transforming orgs are all across the board with Big Bang and Training Center as the only low ranked ones. Communities of practice are high, part of the Spotify model.
  • Pg. 75 tries to derive some advice nonetheless: mostly that separate education and training groups don’t work well/widely, that grassroots is used a lot, and that communities of practice are good, as well as PoCs that get cloned.
  • [This is an instance where the high level of individual contributors in the answers might have an effect. They see the positive change in their own team, but don’t have the big picture view to see if the practices scale up to 1,000’s of people. On the other hand, they might follow the “my congressperson is perfect, all the other ones are corrupt and terrible” pattern. Also, those 5,000+ people orgs struggle.]
  • [We still don’t know how to change an engine in flight.]

🗂 Link: What the heck are content experiences, and why are we overhyping them? A skeptical riff

The two “tent poles” of quality B2B content are:

Thought-provoking stuff that stakes your industry vision and customer know-how, making those who aren’t even your customers want to follow you.
Helpful content from internal experts that covers the nitty-gritty of your products and services.
In other words, all B2B content should either entertain or inform. Informing is easier.

Source: What the heck are content experiences, and why are we overhyping them? A skeptical riff

🗂 Link: VMware Adds Containers to Its Cloud Provider Platform

The platform also added an integration with VMware’s container orchestrator, Enterprise PKS, which means cloud providers can offer containers-as-a-service. And at VMworld the vendor will showcase a technology preview of vCloud Director integration with Bitnami Community.

VMware bought Bitnami in May. It provides application packaging targeted at container and Kubernetes environments. The Bitnami Community houses one of the largest catalogs of click-to-deploy applications and development stacks. Combining this with and Enterprise PKS will allow VMware Cloud Providers to “provide a cloud that’s developer ready, and offer both VM-based workloads and container-based workloads from the same platform,” Bhardwaj said

Source: VMware Adds Containers to Its Cloud Provider Platform