Link: Starbucks teases coffee traceability app feature, compostable cup trial

This focus on the people behind the coffee beans could strengthen positive consumer sentiment around Starbucks’ brand and give it more of a human element as it continues to stretch its global reach. The move could also drive other coffee chains to make their supply chain journeys accessible to their customers. Investing in traceability isn’t unusual in the coffee space — Philz Coffee, for example, provides a breakdown of the steps of the coffee journey it has access to, but leveraging that information for interactive marketing purposes is still a ripe opportunity.

Source: Starbucks teases coffee traceability app feature, compostable cup trial

Link: How the subscription paradigm flips the cloud financials market

In the subscription world, you must understand the lifetime relationship with the customer – all the upsells and renewals and how they all build on one another. You also must understand the revenue, billings, and cash derived from those-again, over the entire lifetime of the customer relationship.

In an ASC-606 world, you must track all performance obligations, which is a fancy term for your promises – both the ones explicitly written in your customer agreement and all those pesky side terms that your sales rep slipped into the free-text field on the quote. You must also know all the implicit promises that people make in the deal or that have become ingrained in your business processes.

Source: How the subscription paradigm flips the cloud financials market

Link: Google debuts migration tool for its Anthos hybrid cloud platform

Anthos applications are deployed in software containers, which are used to host the individual components of each app and make them easier to work with. The main benefit is that developers get to use a single set of tools to build and deploy their apps, and push through updates as necessary, no matter what infrastructure those apps are hosted on. Kubernetes makes it easier to manage large clusters of containerized apps.

Source: Google debuts migration tool for its Anthos hybrid cloud platform

Link: Free Solo

Other women have rebelled in smaller, more quotidian ways. “They expect you to get married,” Whoopi Goldberg said in a recent interview in The New York Times Magazine. “Then one day I thought: I don’t have to do this.” Goldberg is an EGOT winner, remember. No woman should feel pressured to adhere to conservative standards, but it is a testament to the intractability of these gendered expectations that a woman as accomplished as Goldberg, someone who in theory has earned the power to do what she wants, would still feel beholden to them. It reminds me of Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Brigid Schulte publishing an op-ed for The Guardian entitled, “A woman’s greatest enemy? A lack of time to herself.” These are extraordinarily accomplished women who still have to fight for the right to solitude, a state which men in the same position no doubt take for granted. Of course it was a man who authored a recent book that went viral for stating that the happiest demographic was unmarried and childless women, as though the record low number of marriages levels somehow required explanation. In fact, the data this behavioral scientist cited indicated that marriage benefited men more than it benefited women. Another survey found that one of the top reasons women cited for not having children was wanting more time for themselves. In other words, choice, not just to reject what they don’t want, but to choose what they do — now and in the future. As Rebecca Traister wrote, “Wherever you find increasing numbers of single women in history, you find change.”

Source: Free Solo

Link: IT outages in the financial sector: Legacy banks playing tech catch-up risk more outages, UK MPs told

said 65 per cent of outages are in retail banks. She said the regulator received 853 notifications of outages in 2018/19 “that is a huge increase on the previous year”. However, she added some of those incidents were relatively minor, with part of the increase being due to a change in regulatory reporting requirements.

Source: IT outages in the financial sector: Legacy banks playing tech catch-up risk more outages, UK MPs told

Link: What I Learned on Medieval Twitter

Dorothy Kim has argued that Twitter activity, especially during conferences, enables scholars to amplify critical insights that would normally be relegated to the margins, circulating commentary as variously exegetical, irreverent, and dissident as the marginalia in medieval manuscripts: “Twitter can be radically serious in pushing against the ‘authority and control’ of the state, the scholarly-industrial complex, and institutional power. It can also be playful, hysterically funny, irreverent, cute: an utter delight though often also still radically pushing against the ‘authority and control’ of the powers-that-be.”

Source: What I Learned on Medieval Twitter

Link: Low Barr: Don’t give me that crap about security, just put the backdoors in the encryption, roars US Attorney General

Like the Obama administration before it, today’s White House has made backdooring encryption a priority, and legislation is reportedly being prepared to enforce it. Barr promised that FBI Director Chris Wray will give another speech on the topic later this week at the same conference. It looks like the encryption wars are back on.

Source: Low Barr: Don’t give me that crap about security, just put the backdoors in the encryption, roars US Attorney General

Link: Microsoft milestone: Tech giant’s cloud revenue now matches traditional products, analyst says

“We estimate that FY 4Q 19 was the first time MSFT generated as much revenue from running software in its own data centers, including cloud offerings like Azure and Office 365, as well as LinkedIn, Bing, GitHub and Xbox-Live, as it did from software licenses and upgrades, hardware and professional services,” according to the note from CFRA’s John Freeman.

Source: Microsoft milestone: Tech giant’s cloud revenue now matches traditional products, analyst says

Link: Why are large companies so difficult to rescue (regarding bad internal technology)

In terms of the best integration architecture, what seems to me the only long-term solution is something like the unified log architecture that Jay Kreps wrote about back in 2013. All incoming writes need to go into a centralized log, such as Kafka, and then from there the various databases can pull what they need, with each team making its own decisions about what it needs from that central log. However, SuperRentalCorp has retail outlets with POS (point of sale) systems which talk directly to specific databases, and the path of that write (straight from the POS to the database) is hardcoded in ways that will be difficult to change, so it will be a few years before the company can have a single write-point. For now, each database team needs to be accepting writes from multiple sources. But a unified log is the way to go in the long-term. And that represents a large change of process for every one of those 20 teams. Which helps explain why the company has spent 2 years and $25 million trying to build an API, and so far they have failed.

Source: Why are large companies so difficult to rescue (regarding bad internal technology)

Link: The Art of Aphorism

We don’t absorb aphorisms as esoteric wisdom; we test them against our own experience. The empirical test of the aphorism takes the form first of laughter and then of longevity, and its confidential tone makes it candid, not cynical.

Source: The Art of Aphorism

Link: We Need to Talk About Mental Health and Travel

Taking some time out of your day to reflect on the good things you have in your life can be very beneficial to your mental health. Sometimes when we get caught in our downward spiral of negative thinking, we forget that there are a lot of great things to be thankful for. Jotting down 10 things, big or small, that you are grateful for each day can be a real help to get you out of that negative mindset that is so prevalent with anxiety and depression. This is not a cure, but it is a small and useful tool to help you manage your mental health on a daily basis.

Source: We Need to Talk About Mental Health and Travel

Link: AT&T’s ‘Public-Cloud First’ Proclamation a Stake in the Ground

For AT&T to now start the process of adopting the public cloud for what are admittedly “non-network applications” is a big move. It shows that even the most stodgy industry verticals are on board with moving to the public cloud. This will provide a significant new revenue stream for those cloud providers but at the same time allow for greater scale that could drive down pricing models.

Source: AT&T’s ‘Public-Cloud First’ Proclamation a Stake in the Ground

Link: Amazon CTO Werner Vogels on transparency, developers, multi-cloud

The other thing that we’re working with most of our enterprise customers is, what is an exit strategy? What do I need to do, if one moment I decide that I would like to move over to another provider? That for any large enterprise is just good due diligence. If you start using a [SaaS application], you want to know about what do we need to do to get my data out of there, if I want to move let’s say from Salesforce to Workday.

It’s the same for most large enterprises. They want to know how much work is it actually for me to actually move if I decide to go from cloud provider A to cloud provider B, or maybe bring it back on premises.

That’s something that we’ve been working on with most of our large customers, because that’s just good due diligence.

Source: Amazon CTO Werner Vogels on transparency, developers, multi-cloud

Link: IBM Takes A Hands Off Approach With Red Hat

The reason for this hands-off attitude for such expensive acquisitions is simple: Both VMware and Red Hat live and die by the fact that they are neutral to any particular platform. While IBM may prefer Red Hat’s various elements of the stack – the Enterprise Linux operating system, the OpenShift container system, the OpenStack cloud controller, the JBoss application server, and the Ceph block and object storage – it cannot prevent Red Hat’s vast partner network from doing what they do, which is compete against IBM and each other selling Linux stacks. To not do so would be to destroy the value of the Red Hat business, just as Dell would destroy the value of the VMware business if it had only put VMware’s virtualization and cloud software on its own PowerEdge servers

Source: IBM Takes A Hands Off Approach With Red Hat

Your kids are totally gonna love reading this book at night. Like, right before they go to bed and you were looking forward to reading Stranger Things uninterrupted by kids spooked out by anything scary. Not clown. Not clowns smiling and buzzing people with electricity. Nope. That is not scary. Heat up Netflix, Ma! From instagram