Link: The Frozen Middle—Part Two: Thawing

The key, I found, was to agree on new objectives. First, we tackled the question of documentation. In the old model, QA’s job was to make sure that documentation was complete—that each required section of the official template had been filled in with enough information to satisfy our overseers. But in conversation, the head of QA and I agreed that concisenesswas also an important aspect of quality. The project teams had been spending a lot of time writing text that was never read, creating documentation that was repetitive and in places inconsistent. Some sections of the templates made no sense for the types of projects we were doing. So the goal of QA, we agreed, should be to make sure that every document was as shortas possible and didn’t include any irrelevant information, even if that meant leaving template sections blank.

Of course this wouldn’t please our government overseers, who expected every section to be filled out in great detail, but that was my job to take care of—a kind of impediment removal. QA’s job was to ensure quality, which included concision and effective use of time. So QA began to demand simplifications to documents rather than insisting that they be padded with unnecessary words, and I went off to negotiate with overseers on their behalf.

Source: The Frozen Middle—Part Two: Thawing