Google Cloud stuff

A brief overview:

The expansion centers around Google’s new open-source hybrid cloud package called Anthos, which was introduced at the company’s Google Next event this week. Anthos is based on – and supplants – the company’s existing Google Cloud Service beta. Anthos will let customers run applications, unmodified, on existing on-premises hardware or in the public cloud and will be available on Google Cloud Platform (GCP) with Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE), and in data centers with GKE On-Prem, the company says. Anthos will also let customers for the first time manage workloads running on third-party clouds such as AWS and Azure from the Google platform without requiring administrators and developers to learn different environments and APIs, Google said. 

And from an interview with Kurian:

So for us to grow, the primary thing is to scale our go-to-market organization. And we’re very committed to doing that. We just need to hire and train and enable a world class sales team at scale.

Today we have a great sales team, but we are far fewer in number than the other players. We just need to expand that. And as I talked to customers, they asked us to, one: expand our sales organization and our go-to-market teams. Second: specialize (that sales team) with deep expertise in technology and in industry. And third: make it easy to contract and do business with us. We are extremely committed to doing all three of them.

Also, from the product bucket:

Google also announced Anthos Migrate, a beta service that automatically moves virtual machines running on on-premises or other cloud providers into containers on GKE. Assuming it works, that’s a much easier path to the cloud for companies worried about breaking mission-critical applications during the move.

And, a good round up of analyst Tweets.

Every cloud providers, every tech vendor, wants to go up the stack, close to The Business where there’s more money to be had:

During his keynote, Kurian referred to Google Cloud as a “digital transformation provider” – he didn’t say an ‘IaaS alternative to AWS and Azure’. In fact, Google Cloud is open to the fact that enterprises may use multiple IaaS providers (more on that later). Kurian is clearly making a play for Google Cloud to become an enterprise technology vendor that has deep skin in the game with customers, focused on meaningful outcomes, rather than just a pay per usage alternative to other IaaS vendors.

They’re trying a more open source company friendly approach, adding in some popular databases as a service:

Initial technologies include those from open source database system providers Confluent, MongoDB, Elastic, Neo4j, Redis Labs, InfluxData and DataStax.

Also, see the very well written Anthos documentation.