Discussing the common “CIO agenda”

I get asked to talk with “executives” more and more. That’s part of why Pivotal moved me over to Europe. People make lots of claims about what executives want to hear, the conversations you can have with them as a vendor. They don’t have time. You have have to be concise. They don’t want to hear the details. They just want to advance their careers.
None of those are really my style, even part of my core epistemes. When I have a good conversation with anyone, it’s because we’re both curious about something we don’t know. The goal is to understand it, sort of hold it out on a meat-selfie-stick and look at it from all angles. This find that most people, especially people in management positions charged with translating corporate strategy to cash enjoy this. Some don’t, of course.
Anyhow, I’ve been writing down some common themes and “unknowns” for IT executives:
  1. Innovation – use IT to help change how the current business functions and create new businesses. Rental car companies want to streamline the car pick-up process, governments want to go from analog and phone driven fulfillment to software, insurers want to help ranchers better track and protect the insured cows. Innovation is now a vacuous term, but when an organization can reliably create and run well designed software, innovation can actually mean something real, revenue producing, and strategic.
  2. Keep making money – organizations already have existing, revenue producing businesses, often decades old. The IT supporting those businesses has worked for all that time – and still works! While many people derisively refer to this as “keeping the lights on,” it’s very difficult to work in the dark. Ensuring that the company can keep making money from their existing IT assets is vital – those lights need to stay on.
  3. Restoring trust in IT’s capabilities – organizations expect little from IT and rarely trust them with critical business functions, like innovating. After decades of cost cutting, outsourcing, and managing IT like a series of projects instead of a continuous stream of innovation. The IT organization has to rebuild itself from top to bottom – how it runs infrastructure, how it developer and runs software, and the culture of IT. Once that trust is built, the business needs to re-set its expectations of what IT can do, reinventing IT back into everyday business.
What happens next is the fun part: how do executives reprogram their organization to do the above?
That’s my take on “to talk with executives,” then: learning what they’re doing, even validating my assumptions like the above. This is, or course, filled in with all sorts of before/afterr performance anecdotes (“proof points” and “cases”). Those are just conversational accelerants, though. They’re the things that move the narrative forward by keeping the reader engaged, so to speak, by keeping you interested (my self as well).
Anyhow. Even all this is a theory on my part, something to be validated. As I have more of these conversations, we’ll see what happens.

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