Link: “Let’s think about control. I’d struggle to find any engineers operating within a DevOps mindset eschew control of their production systems. I encourage the use of a CMDB, but again, it’s live, automatically updated, and software-based. It’s cal

“Let’s think about control. I’d struggle to find any engineers operating within a DevOps mindset eschew control of their production systems. I encourage the use of a CMDB, but again, it’s live, automatically updated, and software-based. It’s called a Chef server. Similarly, ITIL places a strong emphasis on configuration. Teams I have built do the same. All changes to the system are made in code, go through a peer review process, are automatically tested, and rolled out in a recordable, repeatable, and auditable manner. I encourage tracking of all changes that are made to the system. To do that, I use git and I track problems and resolution in a ticketing system. That could be Jira or Zendesk. When it comes to risk management, compliance, and security, again, I turn to the Chef ecosystem. Chef Compliance, as part of the Chef automation system, provides ways to specify compliance requirements as testable specification, which can then be used for audit and management.”

All that configuration management, logging, and automation gives what’s needed for ITIL-level tracking.
Original source: “Let’s think about control. I’d struggle to find any engineers operating within a DevOps mindset eschew control of their production systems. I encourage the use of a CMDB, but again, it’s live, automatically updated, and software-based. It’s cal

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