Link: Misunderstanding “Open Tracing” for the Enterprise

Enterprise systems management software is hard.

“OpenTracing doesn’t solve the interoperability problem, so what does the “open standard” attempting to solve? Well, for one thing, is that it allows those making gateways, proxies, and frameworks the ability to write instrumentation. That should, in theory, make it easier to get traces connected, but once again the requirement to change implementation details for each tool is a problem.”
Original source: Misunderstanding “Open Tracing” for the Enterprise

Link: On Salesforce’s acquisition of MuleSoft

“[H]aving a decent integration platform in its arsenal enables Salesforce to tell better stories about the seamlessness of its own application portfolio, even as this continues to expand through acquisition (which, note, was where Oracle was with its Fusion Middleware portfolio and strategy when it bought BEA). It also potentially helps Salesforce further develop its Einstein proposition, by making it easier to get access to corporate data from more systems in more locations…. However, just as was the case with BEA, many of MuleSoft’s customers made that investment precisely because it could demonstrate its ability to connect anything to anything without bias, and nurture customers’ own heterogeneous ‘application networks’. I hope Salesforce can take MuleSoft’s existing value proposition forward as it creates the Salesforce Integration Cloud.”
Original source: On Salesforce’s acquisition of MuleSoft

Link: On Salesforce’s acquisition of MuleSoft

“[H]aving a decent integration platform in its arsenal enables Salesforce to tell better stories about the seamlessness of its own application portfolio, even as this continues to expand through acquisition (which, note, was where Oracle was with its Fusion Middleware portfolio and strategy when it bought BEA). It also potentially helps Salesforce further develop its Einstein proposition, by making it easier to get access to corporate data from more systems in more locations…. However, just as was the case with BEA, many of MuleSoft’s customers made that investment precisely because it could demonstrate its ability to connect anything to anything without bias, and nurture customers’ own heterogeneous ‘application networks’. I hope Salesforce can take MuleSoft’s existing value proposition forward as it creates the Salesforce Integration Cloud.”
Original source: On Salesforce’s acquisition of MuleSoft

Link: The Insurance Industry Is A Prime Target For AI Technologies And Solutions

Quote below:

  • Technologies Oriented & Experience Focused: Experience related AI technologies include virtual assistant, speech analytics, and recommendation engines. These technologies are being adopted in customer service and insurance product selection business activities.
  • Technologies Oriented & Operational Focused: Operational AI technologies comprises text analytics, advanced analytics, facial and image recognition, machine learning and natural language generation. Most of these AI technologies are being adopted to improve operational efficiencies. However facial recognition and machine learning are being used to mitigate the risk exposure of insurers.
  • Solutions Oriented & Experience Focused: The two experience focused AI solutions concentrate on providing a positive customer experience. The solutions combine multiple AI technologies to create conversational solutions and industry pre-trained solutions. The latter is also being used to train internal customer facing roles.
  • Solutions Oriented & Operational Focused: As machine learning has grown in maturity, we find insurers combining other AI technologies with machine learning to create deep learning solutions. Currently, risk management is the focus area of deep learning solutions.
    Original source: The Insurance Industry Is A Prime Target For AI Technologies And Solutions

Link: “Do They Have AI?” or That Rant on AI in Security

‘It turns out that our AI analysts often use the phrase “AI” to mean “top techniques from the field of Artificial Intelligence” which today means “deep neural networks” (DNNs, shorthanded to “deep learning” by some), natural language processing, image recognition, etc (the latter probably use DNNs anyway).’
Original source: “Do They Have AI?” or That Rant on AI in Security

Link: How Does Advertising Work?

‘It is also SELECTIVE … because, apparently, we have always been overwhelmed by sensory data and can’t begin to notice it all. Even before Snap and the iPhone X, our brains said: “Too much! Give me the bullets!”… For advertising, the implications are obvious. To rise from our sensory swamp, an ad must be EMOTIONALLY INTENSE. We assume the binary default is positive, but there is evidence that negative works as well. This study (from a consultancy now called System 1) showed that ads we hate are more likely to get us to buy a product than ads we don’t notice’
Original source: How Does Advertising Work?

Link: Windows chief leaving Microsoft as CEO Satya Nadella rolls out massive engineering reorg

‘The reorg includes the creation of two large new engineering groups inside Microsoft, focused on Experiences & Devices, led by Microsoft Office leader Rajesh Jha; and the company’s Cloud + AI Platform, led by Microsoft’s cloud and enterprise chief Scott Guthrie… They join the existing Microsoft AI & Research group, led by research chief Harry Shum, to form three massive engineering groups inside the Redmond tech giant.’
Original source: Windows chief leaving Microsoft as CEO Satya Nadella rolls out massive engineering reorg

Link: There is no “technology industry”

‘But today, the major players in what’s called the “tech industry” are enormous conglomerates that regularly encompass everything from semiconductor factories to high-end retail stores to Hollywood-style production studios. The upstarts of the business can work on anything from cleaning your laundry to creating drones. There’s no way to put all these different kinds of products and services into any one coherent bucket now that they encompass the entire world of business.’
Original source: There is no “technology industry”

Link: Serverless at Bustle

‘Probably the biggest is: how do you deal with the migration of legacy things? At Bustle we ended up mostly re-architecting our entire platform around serverless, and so that’s one option, but certainly not available to everybody. But even then, the first time we launched a serverless service, we brought down all of our Redis instances — because Lambda spun up all these containers and we hit connection limits that you would never expect to hit in a normal app.

‘So if you’ve got something sitting on a mainframe somewhere that is used to only having 20 connections and then you moved over some upstream service to Lambda and suddenly it has 10,000 connections instead of 20. You’ve got a problem. If you’ve bought into service-oriented architecture as a whole over the last four or five years, then you might have a better time, because you can say “Well, all these things do is talk to each other via an API, so we can replace a single service with serverless functions.”’
Original source: Serverless at Bustle