Rule 1: Don’t go to meetings. Rule 2: See rule 1.

Coffee is for coders.

Whether you’re doing waterfall, DevOps, PRINCE, SAFe, PMBOK, ITIL, or whatever process and certification-scheme you like, chances are you’re not using your time wisely. I’d estimate that most of the immediate, short-term benefit organizations get from switching to cloud native is simply because they’re now actually, truly following a process which both focuses your efforts on creating customer value (useful software that helps customers out, making them keep paying or pay you more) and managing your time wisely. This is like the first 10–20 pounds you lose on any diet: that just happens because you’re actually doing something where before you were doing nothing.

Less developer meetings, more pairing up

When it comes to time management, eliminating meetings is the easiest, biggest productivity booster you can do. Start with developers. They should be doing actual work (probably “coding”) 5–6 hours a day and go to only a handful of meetings a week. If the daily stand-up isn’t getting them all the information they need for the day, look to improve the information flow or limit it to just what’s needed.

Somewhat counter-intuitively, pairing up developers (and other staff, it turns out) will increase productivity as well. When they pair, developers are better synced up on most knowledge they need, learning how all parts of the system work with a built in tutor in their pair. Keeping up to speed like this means the developers have still less meetings to go to, those ones where they learn about the new pagination framework that Kris made. Pairing helps with more than just knowledge maintenance. While it feels like there’s a “halving” of developers by pairing them up, as one of the original pair programming studies put it: “the defect removal savings should more than offset the development cost increase.” Pairs in studies over the past 20+ years have consistently written higher quality code and written it faster than solo coders.

Coupled with the product mindset to software that involves the whole team in the process from start to end, they’ll be up to speed on the use cases and customers. And, by putting small batches in place, the amount of up-front study needed (requiring meetings) will be reduced to bite-sized chunks.

It takes a long time to digest 300 pages

We’re going to need a lot more coffee to get through this requirements meeting.

The requirements process is a notorious source of wasteful meetings. This is especially true when companies are still doing big, up-front analysis to front-end agile development teams.

For example, at a large health insurance company, the product owner at first worked with business analysts, QA managers, and operations managers to get developers synced up and working. The product owner quickly realized that most of the content in the conversations was not actually needed, or was overkill. With some corporate slickness, the product owner removed the developers from this meeting-loop, and essentially /dev/null’ed the input that wasn’t needed.

Assign this story to management

Staff can try to reduce the amount of meetings they go to (and start practices like pairing), but, to be effective, managers have the responsibility to make it happen. At Allstate, managers would put “meetings” on developers calendars that said “Don’t go to meetings.” When you read results like Allstate going from 20% productivity to 90% productivity, you can see how effective eliminating meetings, along with all their other improvements, can be on an organization.

If you feel like developers must go to a meeting, first ask how you can eliminate that need. Second, track it like any other feature in the release, accounting for the time and cost of it. Make the costs of the miserable visible.

This concept of attending less meetings isn’t just for developers,The same productivity outcomes can be achieved to QA, the product owners, operations, and everyone else. Once you’ve done this, you’ll likely find having a balanced team easier and possible. Of course, once you have everyone on a balanced team, following this principle is easier.Reducing the time your staff spends in meetings and, instead, increasing the time they spend coding, designing, and doing actual product management (like talking with end users!) get you the obvious benefits of increasing productivity by 4x-5x.

If you feel you cannot do this, at least track the time you’re losing/using on meetings. A good rule of thumb is that context switching (going from one task to another) takes about 30 minutes. So, an hour long meeting will actually take out 2 hours of an employee’s time. To get ahold of how you’re choosing to spend your time, in reality, track these as tasks somehow, perhaps even adding in stories for “the big, important meeting.” And then, when you’re project tracking make sure you actually want to spend your organization’s time this way. If you do: great, you’re getting what you want! More than likely, spending time doing anything by creating and shipping customer value isn’t something you want to keep doing.

It may seem ridiculous to suggest that paying attention to time spent in meetings is even something that needs to be uttered. In my experience, management may feel like meetings are good, helpful, and not too onerous. After all, meetings are a major tool for managers to come to learn how their businesses are performing, discuss growth and optimization options, and reach decisions. Meetings are the whiteboards and IDEs of managers. Management needs to look beyond the utility meetings give them, and realize that for most everyone else, meetings are a waste of time.

For more on improving software in your organization check out my 49 pages in a fancy PDF on the topic.

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