Link: Amazon narrows HQ2 search to 20 cities, moving to next phase in contest for $5B economic prize

“Toronto, Columbus, Indianapolis, Chicago, Denver, Nashville, Los Angeles, Dallas, Austin, Boston, New York City, Newark, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Montgomery County, Washington, D.C., Raleigh, Northern Virginia, Atlanta, and Miami.”
Original source: Amazon narrows HQ2 search to 20 cities, moving to next phase in contest for $5B economic prize

Link: Google’s AutoML lets you train custom machine learning models without having to code

“The basic idea here, Google says, is to allow virtually anybody to bring their images, upload them (and import their tags or create them in the app) and then have Google’s systems automatically create a customer machine learning model for them. The company says that Disney, for example, has used this system to make the search feature in its online store more robust because it can now find all the products that feature a likeness of Lightning McQueen and not just those where your favorite talking race car was tagged in the text description.”
Original source: Google’s AutoML lets you train custom machine learning models without having to code

Link: GDPR compliance – here are the 14 things you actually need to do

Exciting new audit needs ahead, hoss: “Organisations should review their IT systems and procedures to check they comply with GDPR requirements for privacy by design, ensuring only the minimum amount of personal data necessary is processed. Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) should be completed when using new technologies and the data processing is likely to result in a high risk to individuals.”
Original source: GDPR compliance – here are the 14 things you actually need to do

Link: Tolerating distraction

“The modern anxiety about distraction betrays a good deal about us. Insofar as we associate attention with power and control, it reflects our fears of losing both in an increasingly unpredictable cultural and natural climate. We also find ourselves living in an economy where we pay for cultural goods with our attention, so it makes sense that we worry about running out of a precious currency.”
Original source: Tolerating distraction