Introducing microservices

There’s some good “how do I actually get my organization do all this unicorn stuff” comments in this interview with DreamWorks Animation’s Doug Sherman.

Here’s one sample bit on winning people over to microservices. Instead of going into the lab for six months to work on a tool that they think will be useful, they do a lot more user-driven work upfront and then do (it sounds like) weekly small batches to keep the users apprised of the tools and, you’d guess, give continuous feedback:

You have to understand what people want to do in their domain. In the past, Ive gotten it wrong. Ill come up with an idea I think is sound  I think its the coolest thing ever  and Ill work six months in isolation with my team, and then well do this big reveal. And every time we’ve done that, its gone horribly wrong, because 1) people feel like were lecturing to them, like we know better than them. And then 2) we would typically have over-engineered it! It would be like the 747 cockpit, you know? There would be this overwhelming amount of knobs and bits and pieces that I think are great to have, but from their viewpoint, they only need to do a few things, and thats an overwhelming amount of stuff to have to sign up to be able to do. So now, Ive gotten into a habit: before I even write a single line of code, I interview everybody that potentially will use the solution that Im going to write, and I keep them in lockstep with me and my team just about every week. We keep them engaged, helping to influence the direction Im basically trying to echo out in code all of what they want. Its gone so much better, because they feel invested. They don’t feel like in six months I’m revealing this big, mysterious thing. They feel like this is just something they’ve seen through iterations. And whats empowering about that, too, is if you can get the spiritual leaders of the different departments that you’re trying to encourage to use your solution, they’ll help sell it for you.

And then a bit on their progress:

Were about 50% of the way in having some amount of production coverage powered by microservices which are deployable in cloud containers powered by technologies such as Spring and Spring Cloud.

There’s more, good cultural change stories in the interview.

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