IT’s usefulness is improving, but there’s plenty of room to fix the meatware, Surveys – Highlights

It’s another survey about business/IT alignment. Who knows how accurate these leadgen PDFs are, but why not? This one is of “646 CIOs and other IT leaders and 200 line of business leaders.” Some summaries from Minda Zetlin:

When LOB leaders were asked about the role their companies’ CIOs play, 41 percent said the CIO is a strategic advisor who identifies business needs and opportunities and proposes technology to address them. Another 22 percent said the CIO is a consultant who provides advice about technology and service providers when asked.

But 10 percent said their CIO was a “roadblock” who raises so many obstacles and objections to new technology that projects are difficult to complete. And another 9 percent said the CIO was a “rogue player,” with IT making technology decisions on its own, and creating visibility and transparency challenges.

Meanwhile, 36 percent of LOB leaders and 31 percent of IT leaders believe other departments “see IT as an obstacle.” And 58 percent of IT leaders but only 13 percent of LOB leaders agreed with the statement, “IT gets scapegoated by other departments when they miss their own goals.”

This seems better than the usual (kind of out of date) scare chart I used use, from a multi-year Cutter survey:

There’s still, as ever, plenty of room to improve business/IT alignment.

Speaking of that, also in that IDG/CIO Magazine survey, there’s a weird mismatch between the perception of The Business and IT about what IT does:

What does The Business want anyway?

Meanwhile, Vinnie quotes a Gartner survey of 388 CEOs:

  • Almost twice as many CEOs are intent on building up in-house technology and digital capabilities as those plan on outsourcing it (57 percent and 29 percent, respectively).
  • Forty-seven percent of CEOs are directed by their board of directors to make rapid progress in digital business transformation, and 56 percent said that their digital improvements have already delivered profits.
  • 33 percent of CEOs measure digital revenue.

Point being: The Business wants IT to matter and be core to how their organizations evolve. They want programmable businesses. Here’s some examples from another summary of that Gartner survey:

Although a significant number of CEOs still mention eCommerce, more of them align new IT infrastructure investments to advanced commercial activities – such as digital product and service innovation, exploring the Internet of Things (IoT), or adopting digital platforms and associated supplier ecosystems.

According to the Gartner assessment, some CEOs have already advanced their digital business agenda – 20 percent of CEOs are now taking a digital-first approach to business development. “This might mean, for example, creating the first version of a new business process or in the form of a mobile app,” said Mr. Raskino.

Furthermore, 22 percent are applying digital business technologies to their traditional processes. That’s where the product, service and business models are being changed, and the new digital capabilities that support those are becoming core competencies.

There’s demand there, the final result of “the consumerization of enterprise IT,” as we used to crow about. IT needs to catch-up on its abilities to do more than “just keep the lights” on or there’ll be a donkey apocalypse out there.

You seem people like Comcast doing this catching-up, very rapidly. The good news is that the software and hardware is easy. It’s the meatware that’s the problem.

Link

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s