Pivotal Conversations: How microservices enable DevOps, with Josh Long by Pivotal Conversations

It was a pretty good episode:

In preparation for his DevOpsDays Atlanta talk, Josh and Coté (well, mostly Coté) talk about the relationship between microservices and DevOps. They use the CAMS framing to go over how microservices could provide the architectural requirements to make DevOps possible.

Coders work from home more often than those in other jobs

In 2015, an estimated 300,000 full-time employees in computer science jobs worked from home in the US. (This figure also includes related professions such as actuaries and statisticians, but the vast majority are programmers.) Although not the largest group of remote employees in absolute numbers, that’s about 8% of all programmers, which is a significantly larger share than in any other job category, and well above the average for all jobs of just under 3%.

8% is not really that much, but the proportion versus other jobs is large, “more than double.” Of course, doubling, even tripling, small numbers doesn’t really get you that far.

Link

DIUx working in streamlining IT projects at the DoD

Since May 2016, DIUx has completed 21 contracts using other transaction (OT) authority and the average time is 78 days, Shah said at the New America Foundation Future of War summit in Washington.

The mission of DIUx, he said, “is to do agile culture change.…We are never going to be the acquisition arm of the Department of Defense, we’re not the R&D arm of the department.”
DIUx has so far comprised $42 million in program funding, which Shah characterized as a “rounding error of a rounding error” of the DOD budget.

Hey, they’re trying over there in the government. It ain’t easy. I’ve meet with some of the folks there and they sure seem genuine about fixing things up and curious to work closer with the civilian IT world.

When I meet with military people they use the word “agile” over and over: meaning, they’re incredibly interested in modernizing. It’s just the tiny matter of figuring out how to get from here to there.

Link

Frequent flyer programs drive billions(?!) in revenue

Delta Air Lines Inc., the world’s second-largest carrier, said it expects that its American Express partnership will yield $4 billion in revenue per year by 2021, rising by more than $300 million annually until then. Those sums translate to a very high margin of profit, Delta executives have acknowledged, but they’ve decline to specify further. At an investor presentation on March 29, Alaska Air Group Inc. said its Mileage Plan relationship with Bank of America will account for $900 million in annual cash flow, once the airline has fully combined with Virgin America Inc.

Billions per year seems crazy, but I assume they’re not lying.

Link

Coté Show #23: “I don’t have a horse or gun.” Or: We were born in Austin. Or: “you may all go to hell. I am going to Texas.”

Another episode of Charles’ and I’s “throw-back” to our Drunk and Retired Podcast days. This one, on the topic of people’s perceptions of Texas abroad.

Check out the show notes for subscription options and links to stuff mentioned in the show.

Microsoft buys Deis, deeper into Kubernetes & $1.1bn container market – Notebook

A round-up of the news and some context around Microsoft burrowing down further into Kubernetes-land by acquiring Deis:

The deal & market

  • Microsoft: “Deis gives developers the means to vastly improve application agility, efficiency and reliability through their Kubernetes container management technologies…. We expect Deis’ technology to make it even easier for customers to work with our existing container portfolio including Linux and Windows Server Containers, Hyper-V Containers and Azure Container Service, no matter what tools they choose to use.”
  • Deis: “We look forward to making Azure the best place to run containerized workloads.”
  • Deis is/was part of EngineYard, right? – Notable that EngineYard (on April 10th, 2017, day of announcement) doesn’t mention it on their blog, or press release list. And that Deis and Microsoft don’t really either. See 451’s Jay Lyman’s coverage of that deal in 2015.
  • No deal-size was disclosed, of course, but Deis was small and I’m guessing it didn’t fit into EngineYard’s overall strategy, or what (little?) cash they got was a nice to have versus synergies of keeping Deis.
  • Containers are rising in usage, as 451’s Donnie said: “Our latest data says production use of containers has doubled from 10.2% to 22.5% of orgs between Q1 and Q3 2015. Amazing.”
  • 451’s January 2016 container market TAMs and forecast:
Screenshot 2017-04-10 13.56.56

The technology: not so much PaaS anymore, but Kubernetes management

Deis stack

Microsoft likes Kubernetes

  • Seems like Microsoft has gone all k8-crazy. So this is adding k8 support and some cloud-native services/middleware (package mgmt, routing, etc.) to Azure?
  • Back in July of 2016, Microsoft hired a k8 big-wheel (and other, “small wheels,” I’d assume), so they’re obviously into the thing…or at least the thinking behind the think. This leave, once again, Amazon as the last major cloud hold-out on k8.
  • That said, I think Microsoft’s new thing is to like everything that layers on-top, below, or around them. As long as you’re in every deal, you make a lot of money even if you’re not all of every deal. It’s pretty hard, now, of course, to compete with the big clouds.
  • Or, put another way: “Satya is like the Pope Francis of software,” says Alex Polvi, founder and CEO of CoreOS, a company that plays in the same area as Deis. “He took this old institution and made it cool again.”

Misc.

The coming billions in updating bank’s COBOL stacks

Commonwealth Bank of Australia, for instance, replaced its core banking platform in 2012 with the help of Accenture and software company SAP SE. The job ultimately took five years and cost more than 1 billion Australian dollars ($749.9 million).

Being conservative, multiply $500m across the top 20 banks, and you’ve got $10bn, using $749.8m directly, you get much closer to $15bn.

Better start planning.

Source: Banks scramble to fix old systems as IT ‘cowboys’ ride into sunset

Software Defined Talk #92: The middle-class metallurgical people – boothing, streaming sportsball, SOASTA, & Cloudera IPO

Check out the latest episode, record last week.

The summary:

Having something to sell is always key to a profitable business. We explore this life-hack of the business world in discussion Twitter and then Amazon licensing Thursday night football. There’s also some brief talk of Akamai buying SOASTA, Cloudera filing to IPO, and the lost dichotomy of agent/agentless.

That rumor about Oracle buying Accenture: nope!

The Register closes out it’s reporting on the rumor that Oracle was considering buying Accenture:

…spokeswoman Deborah Hillinger has since denied that an acquisition will take place, claiming: “The Accenture rumour is completely untrue. Never even considered it.”

Meanwhile, Dennis covers the many reasons why the deal wouldn’t make sense in the first place. The margin argument is always a good, quick one:

…consultants are not normally selling software solutions, but are selling the bodies and expertise needed to make the chosen solution work, the second part of this model. When you look at how that translates into revenue and profit, it quickly becomes apparent that while the implementation contract may well be 5, 6 or even 10x the software cost, the margins are much smaller per dollar spent by customers. To give you a flavor of what this means, in its latest filing, Accenture recorded operating income of 13.7%. For its part, Oracle reported operating income of 32%. As you can readily see, there is no comparison between the two companies, despite the fact Accenture has been acquiring and developing its own software for solutions outside the ‘mainstream’ of solutions that Oracle sells.

We discussed this rumor on last week’s Software Defined Talk episode as well.