Reactions to Cloudera’s IPO, prospects – Notebook

There’s lots of opinions on Cloudera’s IPO today. Here’s some that I’ve collected in my notebook.

Not valued high enough?

Despite the share-price being up 20% at close, some negative commentary focuses on their valuation dropping from Intel’s funding round, e.g., from Brenon at 451:

The chipmaker paid up for the privilege, putting a ‘quadra unicorn’ valuation of $4.1bn on Cloudera. Altogether, Cloudera raised more than $1bn from private market investors, making the $225m raised from public market investors seem almost like lunch money.

And then there’s the small matter of valuation. In its debut, Cloudera is only worth about half of what Intel thought it was worth when it made its bet.

The counter-point goes a little something like this (as pointed out by Derrick Harris):

“Much has been made of the huge valuation of that Intel-led round, but that’s all misguided noise,” according to IPO Candy, a website founded by Kris Tuttle, the director of research at Soundview Technology Group. “Intel didn’t make the investment for a financial return so the valuation isn’t relevant.”

Back in 2014, Intel was still smarting from missing the shift to mobile computing and Big Data was a favorite as the next big thing. The Santa Clara chip giant’s bet was placed chasing a strategic return, not so much banking a direct return on investment.

You know, all of this is a little bit of ¯_(ツ)_/¯. As I recall, Facebook’s IPO was all wiggly-woggly. If Cloudera makes a lot of money, gets bought for a lot of money, etc., no one will care to remember, just like with Facebook. Success is the best deodorant.

Their business, finances

Also from 451, earlier this month, a profile of their business:

Cloudera is nearly one-third bigger than Hortonworks, recording $261m in sales in its most recent fiscal year compared with $184m for Hortonworks. Both are growing at roughly 50%.

Since 2008, the company has grown steadily. As of January 31, it reports more than 1,000 customers. However, Cloudera is currently emphasizing and banking its success on what it calls the Global 8,000, which are the largest enterprises worldwide. The company notes that its number of Global 8,000 customers increased from 255 as of January 31, 2015, to 381 as of January 31, 2016, and 495 as of January 31. For the year ended January 31, the Global 8,000 represented 73% of Cloudera’s total revenue, while a further 10% of total sales came from the public sector. The company reports 1,470 fulltime employees as of January 31, a slight increase from its headcount of 1,140 the prior year.

More from Katie Roof at TechCrunch:

Cloudera’s market cap is now about $2.3 billion, significantly less than the $4.1 billion valuation Intel gave in 2014. This increasingly common phenomenon is now nicknamed a “down round IPO.”

In an interview with TechCrunch, CEO Tom Riley insisted that this was not a problem for the company because of the “growth prospects ahead of us.” If it performs well in the stock market, it could ultimately achieve the $4 billion-plus value. Square, which went public in 2015 at half its private market valuation, has since seen its share prices more than double.

(Side-note: comparisons of companies, Square and Cloudera, that have nothing to do with each other except being “tech” – and Square is payment processing, not “pure tech,” at that! – drive me a bit crazy, as listeners know.)

And a quick revenue/spend write-up from her:

Cloudera’s revenue is growing, totaling $261 million for the fiscal year that ended in January. The company brought in $166 million at the same time last year.

Losses were $186.32 million, down from $203 million in the same period the year before.

And, according to Jonathan Vanian: “Cloudera spent $203 million on sales and marketing in its latest fiscal year, up 26% from the previous year.”

TAM

I don’t really follow this space well enough anymore to quickly figure out the TAM: I suspect Cloudera operates in several data and BI related ones.

Cloudera isn’t only Hadoop, but 451 put the Hadoop market at $1.3b in 2016, growing to $4.4b in 2020, with a CAGR of 38.3% between 2015 & 2020.

If you throw data warehousing, BI, analytics, and an injection of the mega-databases TAM together, you get a really big TAM, anyhow. Keep in mind though that one of the traps of (definitionally orthodox) disruptors in this space is lowering the TAM of their respective markets, a la Red Hat in operating systems. I don’t get the sense that Cloudera is on that game plan, but others in the market might be.

Buyers’ plans & needs

With respect to what people would do with Cloudera and others in this space (including Pivotal), here’s a good ranking of the information infrastructure priorities Gartner recently found in enterprises:

info plans survey

Also of public/private cloud interest from the summary of that survey: “Based on survey responses, plans for on-premises deployments for production uses of data will drop from today’s 45% to 14% in 2018.”

Looking forward

People in the tech industry care a great deal about IPO’s like this. We’re all curious what The Market’s read on valuation of enterprise IT business models is for our own benefit, and just a general sense of the health of the sector. There’s also usually people you know at the company, so “yay” for people you know.

One day isn’t long enough to tell anything, though, cf., in a completely different space, that Facebook debut weirdness. People got all excited about Cisco buying AppDynamics because that seemed to show some “healthy” signs that money valued this kind of software/SaaS.

At any rate, people still seem to love the Big Data and such. From Cloudera’s CEO, Tom Reilly: “We’re competing with IBM and Watson, so our customers seeing the strength of our finances allows us to do more.” Think of all the free marketing!

And, Mike Olson (original CEO) adds:

The ensuing years have been remarkable. Our company has grown with the market. The original technology has morphed almost beyond recognition, adding real-time, SQL, streaming, machine learning capabilities and more. That’s driven adoption among some of the very biggest enterprises on the planet. They’re running a huge variety of applications, solving a wide variety of critical business problems.

Our early bet has proven correct: Data is changing the world. In applications like fraud detection and prevention, securing networks against cyberattacks and optimizing fleet performance in logistics and trucking, we’re delivering value. We’re helping to address big social challenges, improving patient outcomes in healthcare and helping law enforcement find and shut down human trafficking networks.

Against that background, an IPO takes on a more appropriate scale. We started Cloudera because we believe that data makes things that are impossible today, possible tomorrow. There’s more data coming, and there are plenty of impossible things to work on. Our journey is only well begun.

I admittedly don’t know Cloudera’s business model too well, but my sense is that they align well with the “have something to sell” model that many open source companies in the enterprise space forget to put in place.

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