TrumpTech – survey on Joe Six Pack’s sentiment, telco predictions

I didn’t check the legit’ness of the survey, but:

When it comes to tech priorities for the next four years, the general public doesn’t have the same agenda as tech leaders. For example, only 8% of the general public cares about the Internet of Things and only 5% sees 5G development as a priority. STEM education is only a priority for 13%.

What they do care about is security and hacking, particularly of government data (43%) and consumer data (38%). So if Trump’s administration does come into conflict with the social media and cloud giants, he’s going in with the public’s backing.

There’s no majority belief among either the tech elites or the general public that Trump will make the tech industry more innovative than before (42% and 39% respectively). Among the general public, the largest percentage believes that no change is the most likely option (40%), while more tech elites than Joe Six Packs fear stagnation (28% v 21%).

And, labor-wise:

Some 37% of the general public sees technology as a job destroyer for the average American. The sector is accused of bringing in foreign workers to the US by 70% of the general public and of shipping jobs overseas by 60%. (To be fair, the tech elites go along with these two conclusions!) Over half of the general public (56%) believe that US citizens should be given preference for tech jobs.

Meanwhile, one of the outgoing administrators says there’s plenty of tech jobs, just not qualified candidates:

These efforts will founder if there isn’t a continuing supply of qualified recruits, so next up is to increase access to high-quality science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Underlying the importance of education, the OST noted that more than 600,000 high-paying tech jobs went unfilled in the U.S. in 2015, and the number has only grown since.

See also another outgoing letter that encourages continuing programs that ease IT procurement and shared, cloud services like cloud.gov. Seeing how the Truml administrators treat those programs will be a key litmus test. As I alluded to yesterday, these types of programs seem like ideal “do more with less”/”copy the private sector” programs that fit into Trump’s campaign rhetoric. But, hey: hypocracy ¯_(ツ)_/¯

Telco M&A and regulations

Also, see this extensive net-neutrality/telco prediction piece from Caroline Craig.  With more from 451, if you have access

Despite a very activist FCC under President Barack Obama and Wheeler – resulting in stringent net-neutrality and privacy rules, and a pro-competitive view of mergers and acquisitions – US telecom operators recently have been more than willing to push the envelope. Multiple operators have experimented aggressively with zero-rating. Verizon, in particular, has explored the edges of consumer privacy – from its so-called (and abandoned) ‘super cookie’ effort to its ongoing emphasis on mobile advertising, including customer-data-driven ad targeting. While some industry M&A has stalled, AT&T’s surprising bid for Time Warner pushed the boundaries of vertical integration. A Trump administration looks to be much more hands-off, likely accelerating industry M&A and encouraging telecom providers to experiment freely, with the forces of the competitive market (rather than regulators) reining in anti-consumer oversteps. As the mobile market is now constituted – with four highly competitive wireless operators and a slew of cable operators and other disruptors (e.g., Google and new IoT upstarts) ready to leap in – we’re okay with that. No one wants an anti-competitive industry structure or to see consumer privacy exploited, but overly harsh limits can be destructive, too. It’s up to mobile and broadband operators to not abuse their likely new freedoms, and up to their customers (and regulators) to punish them if they do.

Bonus! check out the huge uptick in digital advertising spend this cycle:

As a matter of fact, digital media spending for 2016 political campaigns was projected to top $1 billion, contributing 9.8 percent of media spend. Comparatively, digital spending during the last presidential election season in 2012 was $160 million. 

Link

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