Oracle losing legacy software sales, growing (public?) cloud sales

Once again, the key metric of new software license sales was off—falling 19% to $1.35 billion compared to last year, and missing analysts’ expectations of $1.44 billion.

On the other hand:

“Our cloud revenue will be larger than our new software license revenue next fiscal year, when the transition will be largely complete.”

And:

“Our cloud applications goal is to be the world largest and most profitable SaaS company. We are growing our cloud business much faster than Salesforce.com, and we can beat them to the $10 billion mark, but it’s going to be close,” Ellison told analysts on the call.

Also:

Database-as-a-service, which basically runs a company’s database on a third party’s cloud, is a fast-growing category for Oracle, according to the company. In fact, Oracle co-CEO Mark Hurd said that business was up 700% year over year, hitting $100 million in quarterly revenue.

Source: Oracle’s Cloud Business Has Yet to Surpass Its Falling License Sales

Autonomy quarter stuffing

When Autonomy was negotiating a sale to an end user, but couldn’t close the sale by quarter’s end, Egan would approach the resellers on or near the last day of the quarter, saying the deal was nearly done. Egan coaxed the resellers to buy Autonomy software by paying them hefty commissions. The resellers could then sell the software to a specified end user – but Autonomy maintained control of the deals and handled negotiations with the end user without the resellers’ aid. There’s no way these transactions could be revenue.

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Developer Relations: More than Traveling the World and Buying People Beer

Some tactical advice, with some small survey figures:

It was a small survey of 79 people, which isn’t particularly surprising since there aren’t that many developer relations roles. Some of the top skills needed to be successful in developer relations include communication, technical, and empathy. They also travel to a lot of events, 50 percent attend more than 15 events per year and 55 percent of them plan to attend even more next year.

Events, direct one-to-one communications, content marketing, and social media are seen as the most effective channels for developer outreach. Developer relations is a fairly new field. Almost 50 percent of developer relations programs where these people work are 2-4 years old and just over 25 percent were less than a year old, which is similar to the experience of developer relations professionals with just under 45 percent of them in the field for 2-4 years. There are also a lot of lone wolves with 30 percent of people surveyed being the only person in their company doing developer relations, and just over 30 percent have teams of 2-5 people.

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On-prem still a big thing, Gartner survey

only 10% of organizations surveyed by Gartner are expected to close their on-premises data centers by 2018

Much of Pivotal’s business is on-premises, very much if it. However, most large organizations I talk with really want to get to much more public cloud as soon as possible. They look to Pivotal Cloud Foundry’s multi-cloud compatibility to help them down the line with that. For example, Home Depot is starting to move applications to Google Cloud.

Anyhow, most people outside of enterprise IY are surprised and a bit incredulous at how much “private cloud” there still is: ¯_(ツ)_/¯

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Amazon is building an ‘Uber for trucking’ app

The app, scheduled to launch in summer 2017, is designed to make it easier for truck drivers to find shippers that need goods moved, much like the way Uber connects drivers with riders. It would also eliminate the need for a third-party broker, which typically charges a commission of about 15% for doing the middleman work.

This is one of those “software is eating the world” things that I would have thought existed already.

[T]he broader goal is to improve the “middle mile” logistics space, which is largely controlled by third-party brokers that charge a hefty fee for handling the paperwork and phone calls to arrange deliveries between shipping docks or warehouses. It would make shipping more efficient and cheaper not just for its customers, but also for Amazon, which

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Amazon grocery store has no cash registers, uses phone

Customers scan the Amazon Go app on their smartphone as they enter the store. The company spent four years developing “just walk out” technology, which detects when items are picked up or returned to shelves and “keeps track of them in a virtual cart,” Amazon said. There’s no checkout line — just leave the store with your groceries, and Amazon will charge your account.

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