Keeping developer skills fresh

My co-worker Richard wrote up a laundry list of tactics to cultivate and maintain developer skills. It’s drawn from the tactics we’re seeing organizations put in place and a recent survey from the Cloud Foundry Foundation.

Internal events

While I used to scoff at internal brown bags and workshops, I’ve seen those be highly effective in organizations looking to buff up at their developer skills. It both transmits actually new information and shows developers that the company actually cares. Upping morale and skills is hard to beat.

Pairing

Also, it looks like the continual cross-training you get from pair programming is effective. Staff keeps up to date from the micro level of new keyboard short cuts to the big picture stuff like architectural patterns and domain knowledge. Plus, they learn and practice working together and trusting each other.

More survey findings

The developer survey that Richard kicks off with has some more interesting answers. Here’s some details from the survey:


– “By a nearly 2:1 margin, they are choosing training over hiring or outsourcing as the preferred method for addressing a shortage of skills in their own companies.”
– “We suspect that the companies further along in their cloud journey are doing more interesting things and are more risk tolerant; developers find those jobs more attractive. However, those companies that still primarily rely on legacy architectures, don’t push the envelope or are only very sluggishly making efforts toward digital transformation, struggle to hire and retain people that have the skills necessary.”
– “the majority of companies (62%) express confidence in the abilities of their developers to “keep current” with their IT knowledge and skills. At an individual level, however, only 47% of developers express confidence in their own ability to keep current.”
– “By a large percentage (60%), companies say they first adopt a technology—then upskill, train, or hire as necessary. This is preferred to selecting a new technology based on the skills already available in the company (40%).”
– “By and large, companies are addressing the shortage of skills by training or upskilling existing people rather than outsourcing (61% versus 39%) or hiring (62% versus 38%). They are making use of a variety of training methods from formal internal trainings, vendor-led trainings to informal trainings like ‘lunch-and-learns.'”
– It was done in 2016Q3, over 845 respondents in an online survey. “The survey divided respondents into four broad IT ‘roles’: Developer 30%, Operations 30%, Manager 20%, and Line of business leadership 20%.” And spread across geographies and industries.

Public cloud by the minute

Google is able to automatically reward end users a discount for loyalty through a sustained-use pricing scheme – the company claims its method for high utilization means reservations do not hugely benefit them, and so it would rather reward users for loyalty rather than for paying up front and forecasting capacity. Google also offers a per-minute billing model (as opposed to per-hour offers from many providers), and this advantage can also be attributed in part to containers. However, as we show, the benefit of per-minute billing only becomes important when workloads are very bursty.

Source: Google economics: Containers are the key

Stop Hitting Yourself. Tips for Succeeding at Digital Transformation

Check out this fine panel from DellEMCWorld:

Observations on how large organizations successfully go through Digital transformation.
When it comes to digital transformation, despite vast resources, large organizations are 40% less likely to be high performing organizations than smaller ones.

Keeping sane at the airport

After 10 years of business travel, this is how I cope at the airport:

  • You’ll get there, even if you’re late.
  • Don’t worry about lines, just wait in them.
  • Few people know what they’re doing here, don’t let their stress stress you out.
  • There are no special snowflakes, unless you have a doctor’s note.
  • The word of airline staff is law, you can’t argue against the agent of the FAA.
  • Relax and walk slow.
  • If you want a better experience, pay more or pay your dues.

When in doubt, and even if it contradicts the above, you can always:

  • Move fast and get out of the way.