Don’t ever read the comments

In July [of 2016?], NPR.org recorded nearly 33 million unique users, and 491,000 comments. But those comments came from just 19,400 commenters, Montgomery said. That’s 0.06 percent of users who are commenting, a number that has stayed steady through 2016.

“Back in my day,” over on the RedMonk blogs we had some lovely comments from time to time. I hear Horace gets good conversations going. I’m tempted to say that niche topics – like tech industry strategy – get good comments, but of you look at the comments on my Register columns they’re a predictable mixed bag.

At first when I was writing definition pieces in DevOps, which El Reg‘s audience seems to loath, the comments were terrible. But recently – and I’m not sure why, really – I’ve found the discussion between commenters really interesting. They’re full of anecdotes (often goofy, but still helpful) and read like a transcript of IT therapy.

All that said, one of the various ad blockers use turns off most comments, so don’t see them on the web. Based on how many likes and smiles pictures of my kids get in Facebook, I think people just like the speed of Facebook and Twitter liking and reactions. That seems like a good “dial” to put in front of people instead of a keyboard.

Source: NPR is killing off comments. That’s great news!

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