024: Analyst relations, how does it work? (Pivotal Conversations)

You’ve heard of “analysts,” those people who cover the technology world with all sorts of quadrants, waves, and forecasts about how much money is spent on different types of software. What industry analysts do is actually a long, interesting list depending on who you are, their customer: a buyer and user of IT, financial and investment banker types, or vendors. This week, after a small section of new left over from last week – are you keeping up here? – we interview Rita Manachi, head of analyst relations at Pivotal. We ask her to go over what analysts do and her tips on working with them.

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066: I-Bankers Smokin’ L’s in the Hot-tub – Software Defined Talk

With two surprise acquisitions this week we have a lot of synergies to discuss. We cover Samsung picking up Joyent, and Microsoft buying LinkedIn. Highly related is a recent article trying to explain what’s going on with private equity buying tech companies. Then, we discuss the big news from chef we’ve been waiting for: the announcement of habitat.

Check out the full show notes for links to the recommendations, conferences, and tech news items we didn’t get to cover: https://cote.io/sdt66.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

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Show notes

Samsung Buys Joyent

  • Joyent notes
  • Coverage from Venturebeat
  • “Until today, we lacked one thing. We lacked the scale required to compete effectively in the large, rapidly growing and fiercely competitive cloud computing market. Now, that changes,”

Microsoft acquires LinkedIn

  • Press Release from Microsoft
  • M&A Synergies Theoretical WTF’ing:
    • Slideshare, extended to all Office formats.
    • Login with LinkedIn + AD = SSO won. Also: “Massively scaling the reach and engagement of LinkedIn by using the network to power the social and identity layers of Microsoft’s ecosystem of over one billion customers. Think about things like LinkedIn’s graph interwoven throughout Outlook, Calendar, Active Directory, Office, Windows, Skype, Dynamics, Cortana, Bing and more.”
    • 433 million professionals in LinkedIn (from MSFT internal memo).
    • …but it’s probably all the same people, tho.
    • “Along with the new growth in our Office 365 commercial and Dynamics businesses this deal is key to our bold ambition to reinvent productivity and business processes.” (MSFT CEO, from MSFT internal memo)
    • Ads and dumb-AI context: “This combination will make it possible for new experiences such as a LinkedIn newsfeed that serves up articles based on the project you are working on and Office suggesting an expert to connect with via LinkedIn to help with a task you’re trying to complete. As these experiences get more intelligent and delightful, the LinkedIn and Office 365 engagement will grow. And in turn, new opportunities will be created for monetization through individual and organization subscriptions and targeted advertising.” (MSFT CEO, from MSFT internal memo)
    • LinkedIn growth since Dec, 2008: “Our team has grown from 338 people to over 10,000, our membership from 32M to over 433M and our revenue from $78M to over $3 billion.” (MSFT internal memo).
    • Others from memo: Lydia training inline in MSFT apps; paid content in MSFT apps (a la Spiceworks); HR and recruiting.
  • Deal PR deck – pretty good. I can see how the social graph and all the “semantic web sit” in LinkedIn, crossed with MSFT assets works well.
  • One take on ads, doesn’t like the Office angle, cause privacy, but oh wait: Google Apps and GMail
  • It’s the 1 dataset MS can keep out of Facebook and Google’s hands.
    https://trackchanges.postlight.com/9-things-microsoft-could-do-with-linkedin-2aec55c2bc72#.iv7cofd13
  • “Microsoft could improve LinkedIn”: Microsoft designs for people who have to do boring things with computers in order to make money. It’s the 9–5 software vendor.
  • Previous big acquisitions: Nokia for $7.2bn, Skype for $8.5bn, Xamarin for $400m.
  • From 451 M&A coverage:
  • I-banker stuff: “Microsoft will pay $196 per share to acquire LinkedIn, a 50% bump up from where it was trading ahead of the deal announcement, although well behind the $250 each share was worth in November. The price tag values LinkedIn at 8.2x trailing revenue.”
  • “The company [Microsoft] must find new ways to differentiate. Integrations with LinkedIn offer potential functionality that will be challenging to duplicate. When the two companies are joined, there will be multiple ways that LinkedIn’s member network, and the data from that, will go into improving Microsoft’s Office and Dynamics apps, besides the other benefits from running a combined company.”
  • “LinkedIn’s tools for recruiters account for 58% of the $860m in revenue it generated in the first quarter of the year [so, $3.440bn run rate]. When combined with educational material from its Lynda.com acquisition, HCM tools make up 65% of sales. Tools for marketers and premium subscriptions (including its offering for sales teams) each make up less than 20% of the business, and are the slowest growing parts of the business.”
  • “Microsoft is the world’s largest software developer, with about $100bn in sales and a $400bn market cap.”
  • I-Bankers rejoice!
  • Tim Anderson inadvertantly makes a good case of CRM/HCM

Private Equity buying Tech Companies

bignews.chef.io

Mid-roll

BONUS LINKS! Not covered in show.

What enterprise wants from Google’s cloud

  • Google, in short, needs to learn to be boring
  • according to Gartner analyst Lydia Leong: “Azure almost always loses tech evals to AWS hands-down, but guess what? They still win deals. Business isn’t tech-only.” What a weird thread that is!
  • “Greene is also tapping her VMware Rolodex, talking with big enterprise rivals like SAP SE, Microsoft and Oracle, to get more of their products into the Google cloud. That’s must-have for some large companies, which need prepackaged software from these providers to run their businesses. No Oracle or SAP products are available on Google’s cloud today. Microsoft and Oracle declined to comment, while SAP confirmed early talks.” From Jack Clark’s Bloomberg piece.

Docker, K8s and Mesos as Interoperability Targets

Meta Podcast Stuff

Apple Announcement

Recommendations

065: The High-level WTF on “Scheduling”

We spend this week talking about workload scheduling, starting with Mesos. It’s a fun ride from CONTROL-M to Lambda, along with Cloud Foundry and serverless. So get ready to beat a horse into glue. Plus, how to handle gifts for father’s day and the usual recommendations at the end.

Check out the full show notes for links to the recommendations, conferences, and tech news items we didn’t get to cover.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR

Show notes

Father’s Day

MesosCon

  • Platform Infrastructure at Twitter: The Past, Present and – Future – Chris Pinkham, VP of Engineering, Twitter
  • Forgot to talk about this, but here are my notes from the MesosCon presentation by Twitter
  • Former Nimbula founder (Oracle acquisition), early AWS founder.
  • Twitter’s kinda big deal, maybe you’ve heard of them. Over 1000 services manage Twitter, over 1,000,000 cores.
  • http://twitter.github.io
  • Heron is a newly open-sourced replacement for Storm. Supporting all of our own code isn’t sustainable, need an open source community.
  • The Ellen Degeneres photo tweet from the 2015 Academy Awards knocked a couple of services over. 25% traffic spike, hit 255k/tweets per second. 2016 Academy Awards had 2x the traffic, no failures.
  • 30,000 node Mesos cluster (probably largest). “We don’t like being the biggest of anything, we find the edge cases.” 130,000,000 containers launched daily.
  • Some of their acquisitions were in public cloud, they don’t move them in-house. They’re actually pushing new services out to AWS where they can. Vine, TellApart, Crashlytics, MoPub, BlueFin, etc. Ad-serving is mostly in AWS.
    Users: Time Warner, Twitter (30,000 host deployment), Apple Siri.

What exactly is scheduling?

  • BMC CONTROL-M
  • Coté gets Matt to “checks out” his crudes understanding. (Spoiler: Checks out.)

Serverless, what’s the deal?

Mid-roll

BONUS LINKS!

Not covered in show:

Somebody’s using Kubernetes

  • Hear the tale!
  • Concur & Barkly Protects
  • Both shops did customizations to the codebase (AWS AZ & ELB support, Prometheus)

AWS & Australia News

Coté’s revamped Pivotal Conversations Podcast

Typosquatting Package Managers

  • Seriously messed up.
  • “In the thesis itself, several powerful methods to defend against typo squatting attacks are discussed. Therefore they are not included in this blog post.”

A Docker on every HPE Server

  • Running on HPE
  • Reference Architectures!
  • HPE 3PAR and SiteScope plugins!
  • Maybe Brandon can regale us with some history: tales of The Mercury Wars!
  • Also, some ALM stuff. Sadly, I don’t have access to the IDC reports on this, however, they’re expecting big things: “IDC’s analysis of this market resulted in worldwide agile application life-cycle management software 2014 revenue of $450.3 million, up 30.5% from the 2013 revenue of $345 million. IDC expects very strong growth for agile ALM software for the 2014–2019 time frame, with growth to $1.8 billion by 2019 and a high CAGR of 32%”
  • erry-one doin’ it! What’s up with Chef’s ALM/CD stuff? Pivotal circle of code vision, with ConcourseCI.

Recommendations

064: Residential Diaper Rash – Software Defined Talk

While Texas moistens up, we talk about the morals of rich tech folks suing journalists, the state of open source business, the history of the BI market, and how to use the Meeker decks. Check out the full show notes for links to the recommendations, conferences, and tech news items we didn’t get to cover.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR

Show notes

“Residential Diaper Rash”

Battling Billionaires

Making money in open source

Mid-roll

Notes from Corporate Strategy Land

Mary Meeker’s 2016 Internet Trends Report

  • Video of the presentation
  • Quartz highlights
    • Software is getting faster at eating the (ecommerce) world: “The time it takes retailers to get to $100 million in online sales is shrinking. It took Nike 14 years from the time its retail site launched, compared to nine years for Lululemon, and eight year for Under Armour.”
  • 213 slides of charts (PDF).

BONUS LINKS!

Recommendations