Coté Memo #035 – Is Docker a threat to OpenStack, NPC in servers, OCP too expensive?, etc.

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Is Docker a threat to OpenStack?

We get questions like this a lot. Here’s the swag du jour:

I think they’re complimentary. OpenStack is more about orchestrating and manage large clouds, where-as Docker alone is at the single node level. Docker should be looked at as two things: (a.) more efficient virtualization, but that likely works on less workloads than virtualization (at the moment), and, (b.) a developer-friendly way to package up applications for deployment into cloud and cloud-like environments (as well as non-cloud infrastructure).

Docker is a threat to virtualization, primarily. Systems like Mesosphere, CoreOS, and Kubernetes (I don’t understand it well enough, but I think it fits here) that use (or could use) things like Docker are more a threat to OpenStack. Why? Developers building applications could find the stripped down management and orchestration in those systems more than good enough and not go in for the “bigger plate of hassle” that OpenStack brings. The question becomes: is OpenStack “over” (managing how these things are used) those, or “under” (managed by and used a fungible resource) them?

As with all “threats” to OpenStack, the key question is: can these alternatives get into a production ready, get up and running in less than a day state before OpenStack does? I.e.: “OpenStack is hard, our stuff is easy.”

Fun & IRL

  • RE/Search – in the pre-web days, I loved these books. I don’t think I ever bought one, but I always sought them at at Half-Priced Books and thumbed through them. Now of course, we have the web.

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