Corporate Breakfast

Splurging on a RR1 omelette

One of the odd things starting at Dell was that they have a cafeteria in each building. I’ve never worked at a place big enough for that. Anyhow, they do pretty well with omelettes and refried beans. Slop in some pico de gallo and salsa, and you’ve got a hot sloppy mess only rivaled by Tamale House:

Beef enchiladas

Two very different estimates of cloud email usage and forecasts

A while back I posted a quick quote from recent Gartner prognosticating about cloud email. The up-shot was that right now, it’s just about 8% for all types of companies, globally (except India and China for some reason). Someone from SpiceWorks left a comment that arecent survey of theirs indicated something much different, at least across the more SMB focused demographics they asked (out of 539 respondents, 46% were in companies of 10-99 employees, 23% were from companies of 100-249). Gartner, no doubt, covers a broader market, perhaps even weighted to larger companies (I don’t have access to the report, so I can’t look up the demographics).

For your entertainment, here are the two charts:

Email Moving to Cloud Estimates

Email Moving to Cloud Estimates

(The SpiceWorks 2014 estimate is a bit of fuzz-work on my part based on people’s claims to migrate in six months. If that bothers you, just assume it’s flat and the fun still stands.)

No one got fired for buying IBM cloud

So what is the impact of IBM’s acquisition of SoftLayer? This analyst believes this acquisition may be a fundamental signal to competitors that the old world of outsourcing is fading and that the only way to the future is delivery of services via an “IT” utility called the cloud. Just consider that 80% of U.S. buyers indicate that they will have transformed 50% of their IT environment to a cloud by 2017 and that they will not have all the resources to manage their own cloud.

David Tapper, IDC

Tapper also covers a good history of IBM getting into “utility computing,” all the way back to 2000-ish, if not 1957.

I met and talked with Tapper at the recent Dell analyst event. I liked him a lot: he was pretty much as abrasive/honest as the UK analysts! As in this piece, what I like is people who bring the full, shaggy-dog context to what seems like a point in time in the IT industry continuum.

How’s Microsoft doing with Yammer?

If we look at it from Yammer’s perspective, it’s been a good year. Being part of the Microsoft family has helped it grow its total user base by 60% in the last 12 months to almost 8 million users, and its number of paid networks has grown by 200%. Plus, Yammer’s 2012 full year sales almost tripled year over year, helped by a stellar Q4 performance.

Microsoft & Yammer: still a long way to go

Heterogenous Systems Management

Increasingly, PC makers are experimenting with Android, given that Microsoft’s Windows 8 devices have struggled to attract consumers, according to analysts. Google promotes Android as a free and open operating system, and many tech companies are already relying on the OS to build their smartphone and tablet products.

PC makers will come out with more Android devices, "But the question is what is it going to look like?" said Bryan Ma, an analyst with IDC. "Most of the good Android apps aren’t really for the larger screens."

HP shows off 21-inch all-in-one desktop installed with Android

Despite where I work, I don’t pay super attention to this space. However, the above does provoke the point: between Chrome, iOS, Android, OS X, and Windows, if you lump them all together, you’ve got mass fragmentation on the "desktop" area. Throw in all the public cloud archipelagos, along with "traditional IT," and It’s heterogenous systems management all the way down!

A surplus of innovation

Adrian Cockcroft, who runs all things cloud for Netflix, called it “technical indigestion.” His group is releasing an open source project a week – including new monitoring tools that came out this week. “We’re driving a lot of innovation but we’re giving people indigestion. There’s only so many blog posts you can read in a day,” he said.

‘Analysis paralysis’ slowing down cloud adoption