Things analysts forecasts won’t tell you

“These old technologies are holding us back. They’re anchors on where we want to go,” he said. “We find the things that have outlived their useful purpose. Our competitors are afraid to remove them. We try to find better solutions – our customers have given us a lot of trust. In general, it’s a good idea to remove these rotating medias from our computers and other devices. They have inherent issues — they’re mechanical and sometimes break, they use power and are large. We can create products that are smaller, lighter and consume less power.”

Ain’t no 5 year bar graph that says that

Integration is gonna be a problem for cloud

Enterprise software integration is hard and risky. Once you’ve invested in integrating your enterprise applications with one another (and/or with your partners’ applications), that integration becomes the #1 reason why you don’t want to change your applications. Or even upgrade them. That’s because the integration is an extension of the application being integrated. You can’t change the app and keep the integration. SOA didn’t change that.

Integration is lockin

Some Kind of Hybrid Cloud

Our customers are asking for two interrelated items: federation to public clouds and a choice of public cloud APIs. It’s been very consistent. Customers are all deploying some kind of hybrid solution. Some times they start in public and want to move some workloads back to private, like Zynga. Some times they start in private and want to move some workloads back to public. Regardless, it’s clear they want to run mixed mode for the forseeable future: some capacity in private and some in public. The challenge, then is for them have private clouds that are compatible with public clouds

Randy Bias on adding Google Cloud compatibility to OpenStack

Enterprise vs. Consumer Bid’ness

Workday was founded seven years ago by two guys with the best imaginable pedigrees, deep pockets, and networks to call on to get stuff done quickly. Duffield and Bhusri raised a reported $250 million to get the company humming and grew steadily to reach $134 million in annual sales as of last January. That’s impressive, but by contrast consumer-focused file-sharing site Dropbox was founded two years after Workday and in that shorter stretch also raised $250 million and reached $240 million in sales.

Workday’s IPO