“Finally, I do not think the economic case is settled. The thing to bear in mind is that service…”

“Finally, I do not think the economic case is settled. The thing to bear in mind is that service providers operate their DCs as profit centers (its what they do), which is different from most enterprises, which operate their data centers as costs centers (support what they do). This is an important distinction, because the it guides how organizations fund and invest in their IT infrastructure—for the former you optimize you data center to maximize revenue generation capability, for the latter, you optimize to minimize expense. If you are looking to drive revenue, the only hurdle is to show you can effectively monetize the investment—give me $1.00 and I will give you a $1.50 back in a meaningful period of time. If you are looking to optimize for expenses, its a bit more challenging—while there is no inherent limit to how much revenue you can generate, this is a natural limit to how much money you can save (you cannot drive costs below 0). Often, if you have sunk cost in infrastructure that is otherwise up and running well, the best course of action is to do nothing—I find that if you are going to make an “invest-to-save” argument to a customer, you better have some solid, empirical data to back it up. The reality is that all this SDN stuff might end up being amazingly cool and useful but not really do anything meaningful for TCO. In recent history, both cloud and server virtualization were introduced with much heralded costs savings. As we have gained experience with these technologies, we have found them quite useful, but the economic angle has not always played out as expected.”

Cisco Blog » Blog Archive » Final Thoughts on the Open Networking Summit (via irq)

Re: The History of Tech

In Robert Brook”s ever delightful daily newsletter (you should really subscribe – it’s comforting like having some cookies with your favorite aunt or grandma – or, despite suffering through getting up at 4am in the morning, that serene feeling of fishing on a quiet, dusky lake in the early morning) he quotes Dave Winer:

I wonder if Google employs any historians to advise them on strategies tried in the past and how they turned out.

To which I replied, to Robert: hardly anyone tracks the year-to-year history of technology and strategies therein. I find it incredibly annoying. (Part of the problem is that in the past decade, the thing to cover became the web [Google, Facebook, etc.] instead of software itself.) As Dave points out, this results in countless incidents of buffoonery and is the basis for much of the power (older) tech analysts and executives have: since no one documents this history, they have stronger, history-based intuitions about what will work and not work. 

 
For those who are into that whole “reading books” thing:

 
  • In Search of Stupidity is one of the few books on tech history (I read the first edition – there’s been updates).
  • The Business of Software – the first 1/3 or so is mostly just the history of the software industry. One forgets how dominate IBM was and what a massive disruptor Microsoft was.
  • While Accidental Empires isn’t purely software focused, it’s a damn good history of the tech industry up to around 1990.
If you read those three books, or so, you’ll get that same Winer feeling that things just go in infinite loops, turtles all the way down and all that, in the tech world…and, it’ll make you appreciate how damn hard it is to have true, revolutionary successes & shifts like PCs (!), open source, the web, smartphones/tablets…and how easy & common it is to try the same dumb shit over and over.

Justin Fox
By Justin Fox, wired.com

It’s an age of unprece­dent­ed, stag­ger­ing tech­no­log­i­cal change. Busi­ness mod­els are being trans­formed, lives are being upend­ed, vast new hori­zons of pos­si­bil­i­ty opened up. Or some­thing like that. These are all pret­ty com­mon…

“We have no colonies on Mars, we still can’t get by without prehistoric fuel, the dishwasher still doesn’t get all the dishes clean, and very few of us have personal jetpacks. You call this progress?”

Justin Fox By Justin Fox, wired.com It’s an age of…

Justin Fox
By Justin Fox, wired.com

It’s an age of unprece­dent­ed, stag­ger­ing tech­no­log­i­cal change. Busi­ness mod­els are being trans­formed, lives are being upend­ed, vast new hori­zons of pos­si­bil­i­ty opened up. Or some­thing like that. These are all pret­ty com­mon…

“We have no colonies on Mars, we still can’t get by without prehistoric fuel, the dishwasher still doesn’t get all the dishes clean, and very few of us have personal jetpacks. You call this progress?”

BYOD Still Blocked for Official Work Tasks
Isha Suri, siliconangle.com

A recent sur­vey by Mime­cast, a sup­pli­er of cloud-based email archiv­ing, con­ti­nu­ity and secu­ri­ty for Microsoft Exchange and Office 365, has revealed that BYOD – Bring Your Own Device is becom­ing a hot topic among enter­pris­es, espe­cial…

The dark horse of BYOD is that employee’s equipment is just better than corp issued equipment (which is viewed as a place to cut costs, not boost worker moral and productivity, never mind all that “mobile worker” stuff.

BYOD Still Blocked for Official Work Tasks Isha Suri,…

BYOD Still Blocked for Official Work Tasks
Isha Suri, siliconangle.com

A recent sur­vey by Mime­cast, a sup­pli­er of cloud-based email archiv­ing, con­ti­nu­ity and secu­ri­ty for Microsoft Exchange and Office 365, has revealed that BYOD – Bring Your Own Device is becom­ing a hot topic among enter­pris­es, espe­cial…

The dark horse of BYOD is that employee’s equipment is just better than corp issued equipment (which is viewed as a place to cut costs, not boost worker moral and productivity, never mind all that “mobile worker” stuff.

Lou Montulli
usesthis.com

Who are you, and what do you do?

I think of myself as an engi­neer pri­mar­i­ly, but I spend most of my time orga­niz­ing, plan­ning and meet­ing with peo­ple. I am cur­rent­ly the cofounder and chief sci­en­tist at Zetta.net, an enter­prise clo…

DrunkAndRetired.com Podcast Downloads since circa 2006. This actually includes all my “personal” podcasts, but most of them are DrunkAndRetired.com ones. The new Back of the Envelope ones are doing nicely too.

The Four Hundred—AWS/400: Amazon Builds An AS/400-oid…

The Four Hundred—AWS/400: Amazon Builds An AS/400-oid Cloud
itjungle.com

AWS/400: Ama­zon Builds An AS/400-oid Cloud

Pub­lished: April 23, 2012

by Tim­o­thy Prick­ett Mor­gan

OK, there is no such thing as AWS/400, but con­cep­tu­al­ly speak­ing, the col­lec­tion of 30 cloud ser­vices are the mod­ern ana­log to th…

“NoSQL databases are crazy stupid complicated, and there are literally only two things Amazon makes you think about to use it. This is what makes AWS truly revolutionary. Not its virtualization and cloudiness, not its utility computing model, but the relentless desire by Amazon’s crack staff of techies to get companies out of the infrastructure management business. IBM is talking about automating the installation and patch management of systems, operating systems, application servers, and database software on the PureSystems machines announced a week ago, and Amazon has removed every bit of complexity from using a database. Your children or grandchildren will understand DynamoDB. Heck, I might even give it a whirl.”

(Originally at CoteIndustries.com

Feature: For today’s IT professional, the iPad is an…

Feature: For today’s IT professional, the iPad is an addition, not a replacement
editors@arstechnica.com (Ars Staff), arstechnica.com

When I think about the iPad as a sysad­min’s tool, I don’t think about it in terms of can/can’t. Obvi­ous­ly, the iPad can be a sysad­min tool. Heck, I used Win­dows Mobile 6 phones as sysad­min tools. It wasn’t a lot of fun, but if you were real­…

(Originally at CoteIndustries.com

Instagram // ben’s blog

Instagram // ben’s blog:

Ben’s Blog, bhorowitz.com

Now what the hell is you lookin’ for?
Can’t a young man get money anymore?
Let my pants sag down to the floor
Really do it matter as long as I score?
—Mase, Lookin’ at me

Two years ago we invest­ed $250,000 in Insta­gram. Than…

“Ordinarily, when someone criticizes me for only making 312 times my money, I let the logic of their statement speak for itself.”

(Originally at CoteIndustries.com

The Four Hundred–AWS/400: Amazon Builds An AS/400-oid Cloud
itjungle.com

AWS/400: Ama­zon Builds An AS/400-oid Cloud

Pub­lished: April 23, 2012

by Tim­o­thy Prick­ett Mor­gan

OK, there is no such thing as AWS/400, but con­cep­tu­al­ly speak­ing, the col­lec­tion of 30 cloud ser­vices are the mod­ern ana­log to th…

“NoSQL databases are crazy stupid complicated, and there are literally only two things Amazon makes you think about to use it. This is what makes AWS truly revolutionary. Not its virtualization and cloudiness, not its utility computing model, but the relentless desire by Amazon’s crack staff of techies to get companies out of the infrastructure management business. IBM is talking about automating the installation and patch management of systems, operating systems, application servers, and database software on the PureSystems machines announced a week ago, and Amazon has removed every bit of complexity from using a database. Your children or grandchildren will understand DynamoDB. Heck, I might even give it a whirl.”

Instagram // ben’s blog

Ben’s Blog, bhorowitz.com

Now what the hell is you lookin’ for?
Can’t a young man get money anymore?
Let my pants sag down to the floor
Really do it matter as long as I score?
—Mase, Lookin’ at me

Two years ago we invest­ed $250,000 in Insta­gram. Than…

“Ordinarily, when someone criticizes me for only making 312 times my money, I let the logic of their statement speak for itself.”

Instagram // ben’s blog