I read O’Reilly’s .Net Essentials over the weekend; I realize that I’m simplifying it, but it’s really just an MS version of Java with all the names changed, and support for compiling VB and “Managed” C into whatever .NET calls bytecode, along with C#.

There’s more specific support for distributed computing, via SOAP and HTTP get/put, along with what seems like a pretty good Data Object (ADO/JDO) framework. One of the big things, it seems, is that all this will run on Windows real easy like; unlike Java where you have to install the JRE, set up the classpath, etc., etc.

Anyhow, nothing new there really. But it’s depressing that MS is trying to re-invent the wheel. All the claims that the book makes on behalf of .NET are all the claims Java made when it debuted as well. In that sense, it’s a little funny and sad: all you’d have to do is switch the words around and you’d have Java 1.0 Essentials instead of .NET Essentials.

Hopefully, Sun will get moving and make a Java -> IL (.NET’s bytecode) converter. Then we won’t have to worry too much about learning new words for the same old shit: the #1 problem of a programmers life.

The continueing adventures of Josh in California: ”
I’m enjoying the freedom of travelling alone but I do sort of wish I
had someone to debrief myself to, someone to dump my ideas on.
Not having that person, I’ve decided to just Blog it all and see what
happens with that, which will give me a much more permanent
record of the whole journey, but I’d probably be, in general, more
comfortable out here with a friend. Difficult finding a friend to go to
California with for three weeks in the middle of the school
semester, though. So…”

I’ve been reading the venerable Design Patterns. At times, the discusion is a bit too abstract for my more “concrete” mind. To get more chatter on the topic, here’s some interesting pages to go along with it:

I’ll be making “The Castle Run,” as Arley dubbed it today “for no good reason,” to Houston sometime today. So…uh…well, I really only know 3 people in Houston. And to the rest of you, please don’t rob my apartment. The only thing of value, my laptop, will be with me…so take that you stree stealin’ scuds!

Hourly vs. Salary Pay

I’ve been trying to juggle around the calculations for how much I’d get paid hourly vs. how much I’d get paid yearly. The theory is if you’re paid hourly, you only get paid for 1,920 hours a year (that’s 40 hours for 52 weeks minus 2 weeks for vacation and 10 “sick”/PTO days). But, if you’re salaried, you get paid for working 2,080 hours/yr..

Second, if you figure generous benefits, you can figure 20% overhead for a salaried employee. This would cover things like insurance, 401(k), etc. So, to convert between an hourly wage and a yearly wage, you’d use this little formula:

  1. Total $ made for a business year at <hourly wage>
    <hourly salary> = <hourly wage> * 1920
  2. Theoretical Overhead at above rate: <over-head> = <hourly salary> * 20%
  3. Approximate yearly salary: <salary> = <hourly salary> – <over-header>

The general idea is that you find out how much you’d be paid at an hourly rate, and then subtract the theoretical overhead from it, and then that would be your salary. The reasoning there, of course, is that your benefits are part of your salary. So, I made up this little table:

Hourly Wage Hourly Salary ~ Salaried Salary
$20.00 $38,400.00 $30,720.00
$21.00 $40,320.00 $32,256.00
$22.00 $42,240.00 $33,792.00
$23.00 $44,160.00 $35,328.00
$24.00 $46,080.00 $36,864.00
$25.00 $48,000.00 $38,400.00
$26.00 $49,920.00 $39,936.00
$27.00 $51,840.00 $41,472.00
$28.00 $53,760.00 $43,008.00
$29.00 $55,680.00 $44,544.00
$30.00 $57,600.00 $46,080.00
$31.00 $59,520.00 $47,616.00
$32.00 $61,440.00 $49,152.00
$33.00 $63,360.00 $50,688.00
$34.00 $65,280.00 $52,224.00
$35.00 $67,200.00 $53,760.00
$36.00 $69,120.00 $55,296.00
$37.00 $71,040.00 $56,832.00
$38.00 $72,960.00 $58,368.00
$39.00 $74,880.00 $59,904.00
$40.00 $76,800.00 $61,440.00
$41.00 $78,720.00 $62,976.00
$42.00 $80,640.00 $64,512.00
$43.00 $82,560.00 $66,048.00
$44.00 $84,480.00 $67,584.00
$45.00 $86,400.00 $69,120.00
$46.00 $88,320.00 $70,656.00
$47.00 $90,240.00 $72,192.00
$48.00 $92,160.00 $73,728.00
$49.00 $94,080.00 $75,264.00
$50.00 $96,000.00 $76,800.00
$51.00 $97,920.00 $78,336.00
$52.00 $99,840.00 $79,872.00
$53.00 $101,760.00 $81,408.00
$54.00 $103,680.00 $82,944.00
$55.00 $105,600.00 $84,480.00
$56.00 $107,520.00 $86,016.00
$57.00 $109,440.00 $87,552.00
$58.00 $111,360.00 $89,088.00
$59.00 $113,280.00 $90,624.00
$60.00 $115,200.00 $92,160.00
$61.00 $117,120.00 $93,696.00
$62.00 $119,040.00 $95,232.00
$63.00 $120,960.00 $96,768.00
$64.00 $122,880.00 $98,304.00
$65.00 $124,800.00 $99,840.00
$66.00 $126,720.00 $101,376.00
$67.00 $128,640.00 $102,912.00
$68.00 $130,560.00 $104,448.00
$69.00 $132,480.00 $105,984.00
$70.00 $134,400.00 $107,520.00
$71.00 $136,320.00 $109,056.00
$72.00 $138,240.00 $110,592.00
$73.00 $140,160.00 $112,128.00
$74.00 $142,080.00 $113,664.00
$75.00 $144,000.00 $115,200.00
$76.00 $145,920.00 $116,736.00
$77.00 $147,840.00 $118,272.00
$78.00 $149,760.00 $119,808.00
$79.00 $151,680.00 $121,344.00
$80.00 $153,600.00 $122,880.00
$81.00 $155,520.00 $124,416.00
$82.00 $157,440.00 $125,952.00
$83.00 $159,360.00 $127,488.00
$84.00 $161,280.00 $129,024.00
$85.00 $163,200.00 $130,560.00
$86.00 $165,120.00 $132,096.00
$87.00 $167,040.00 $133,632.00
$88.00 $168,960.00 $135,168.00
$89.00 $170,880.00 $136,704.00
$90.00 $172,800.00 $138,240.00
$91.00 $174,720.00 $139,776.00
$92.00 $176,640.00 $141,312.00
$93.00 $178,560.00 $142,848.00
$94.00 $180,480.00 $144,384.00
$95.00 $182,400.00 $145,920.00
$96.00 $184,320.00 $147,456.00
$97.00 $186,240.00 $148,992.00
$98.00 $188,160.00 $150,528.00
$99.00 $190,080.00 $152,064.00
$100.00 $192,000.00 $153,600.00

* * *

Related to the hourly vs. salaried topic, take a look average income by skills table at ComputerJobs.com. It’s interesting not only to see what different skills pay, but that hourly pay is much higher; though, they don’t take into account benefits.

Arguable, hourly people don’t have the same guarantee for their 1,920 hours a year as salaried people do for their 2,080 hours; that is, they get hired for 40 hours of work here, 5 hours there, etc., etc. Thus, hourly folks might not make more, or even as much, as salaried folks

But, then again, any hour that you don’t work is your own, and is probably work at least double your going rate. Furthermore, who’s to say you won’t get more than 1,920 hours of work. And then there’s always sweet, sweet overtime.